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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




4*"' 7 - " 



Public Document No. 57 

NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Works 



For the Year 1919 




boston 

wright & potter printing co., state printers 

32 derne street 

1920 



Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



CONTENTS. 



I. Organization and Administration, 
Board, Officers and Employees, 
II. Metropolitan Water District, 

III. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction 

IV. Water Works — Maintenance, . 

(1) Storage Reservoirs, . . . 

(2) Aqueducts, .... 

(3) Pumping Stations, . 

(4) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works, . 

(6) Wachusett Power Plant, . 

(7) Sudbury Power Plant, 

(8) Forestry, .... 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply, 
(10) Water Consumption, 

V. Water Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments, 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1919, 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 31, 1919, 

(4) Water Assessment, 1919, . 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(6) Receipts, ....... 

(c) Assets, ........ 

(d) Liabilities, ....... 

VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, ...... 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 

(4) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 

VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, .... 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 

North Metropolitan System, ..... 
South Metropolitan System, ..... 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1919, . 

North Metropolitan System, ..... 
South Metropolitan System, ..... 

(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 31, 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 

(5) Sewer Assessments, 1919, . 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement, . 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(b) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VIII. Recommendations for Legislation, 



Companies, 



1919, 






IV 



CONTENTS. 



Ashland, Hopkinton an 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division, 

Organization, ......... 

Construction, ......... 

Meters and Connections, ...... 

Additional 36-inch Low-service Pipe Line for East Boston, 
Northern Extra High-service 16-inch Pipe Line for Lexington, 
Southern Extra High-service 12-inch Pipe Line for Hyde Park and M 
Maintenance, .... 

Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds, 
Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, 

Farm Pond, . 

Lake Cochituate, 
Aqueducts, . 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, . 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 
Protection of the Water Supply, 

Sanitary Inspection, 

Filtration and Chlorination, 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks 

Purchase of Land, . 
Clinton Sewage-disposal Works, 
Forestry, .... 

Wachusett Lands, . 

Sudbury and Cochituate Lands 

Distribution Reservoir Lands, 
Hydro-electric Service, . 

Wachusett Service, 

Sudbury Service, 
Distribution Pumping Service, 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, 

Arlington Pumping Station, 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, 
Distribution Reservoirs, 

Weston Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs, 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 

Bellovue and Forbes Hill Reservoirs, 

Arlington and Mystic Reservoirs, 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station, 

Grounds at Arlington and Hyde Park Pumping Stations, 
Distribution Pipe Lines, 

Low-service Mains in East Boston, 

Pipe Bridges, .... 

Pipe Yards, .... 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gage 

Breaks and Leaks, .... 
Emergency Pipe Line Service, . 
Consumption of Water, .... 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes, 
Water supplied outside of Metropolitan Water District, 
Quality of the Water, 
Engineering, 



d Whitehall 



Iton, 



Rest 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division, . 
Organization, ........ 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, ..... 

Areas and Populations, . . . 

Metropolitan Sewers, ....... 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, 
Construction, ........ 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

Reading, Extension, ..... 

Section 76, Reading Extension, . . . 

Section 73, Reading Extension, 
Section 74, Reading Extension, 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

Wellesley Extension, ..... 

Section 99, Rock Tunnel, Wellesley Extension, . 
Section 99, Trench and River Crossing, Wellesley Extension 
Section 101, Wellesley Extension, 
Maintenance, ........ 

Scope of Work and Force employed, 
Deer Island Pumping Station, . 
East Boston Pumping Station, 
Charlestown Pumping Station, 
Ale wife Brook Pumping Station, 
Ward Street Pumping Station, 
Nut Island Screen-house, .... 

Government Use of Old 24-inch Quincy Force Main, 
Gasolene in Public Sewers, .... 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works 
Stoneham, ...... 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing 
Sewerage System, ..... 

North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 
Whole Metropolitan System, 
Pumping Stations, ...... 

Capacity and Results, ..... 

North Metropolitan System, .... 

Deer Island Pumpjng Station, 
East Boston Pumping Station, . 
Charlestown Pumping Station, . 
Ale wife Brook Pumping Station, 
South Metropolitan System, . . 

Ward Street Pumping Station, . 
Quincy Pumping Station, .... 

Nut Island Screen-house, .... 

Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, . 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, .... 

Material intercepted at the Screens, 



Sewage 



in Winchester, Woburn and 



to Metropolitan 



PAGE 

101 
101 
102 
102 
103 
103 
106 
106 
106 
107 
107 
108 
108 
108 
108 
109 
109 
110 
110 
110 
111 
111 
111 
111 
112 
112 
112 



Appendix No. 1. — 

Appendix No. 2. - 
. Table No. 1. 

Table No. 2. 

Table No. 3. 

Table No. 4. 

Table No. 5 

Table No. 6 



— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur 

ing the Year 1919 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1919, 

— Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1919, 

— Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1919, 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1919, 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897-1919, 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875-1919, 



134 
139 

139 
140 
141 
142 
144 
145 



vi CONTENTS. 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. page 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile, 

1897-1919 147 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile, 

1875-1919 149 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1919, 153 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1919 154 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1919 A 155 

Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at 

the Beginning of Each Month, ........ 156 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for 

the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, . . . . .157 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1919 by 

Months, 158 

Table No. 15. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1919, . •. 159 

Table No. 16. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Water Works in 1919, . . . . 160 

Table No. 17. — Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, as constituted 

in the Year 1919, and a Small Section of the Town of Saugus, 1893-1919, 163 
Table No. 18. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 166 
Table No. 19. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 167 

Table No. 20. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 168 

Table No. 21. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . . 169 

Table No. 22. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 170 
Table No. 23. — Averages of Chemical Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1919 171 

Table No. 24. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 1892-1919, . 172 
Table No. 25. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, 1898-1919, 173 

Table No. 26. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1919 175 

Table No. 27. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1919 176 

Table No. 28. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1919, 177 

Table No. 29. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1919 178 

Table No. 30. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works, Main Lines and Connections and 

Number of Valves set in Same, December 31, 1919, .... 179 
Table No. 31. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works, Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, 

- December 31, 1919 180 

. Table No. 32. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and Connections and 

Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, December 31, 

1919 181 

Table No. 33. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, per cent of Services metered, Fire Serv- 
ices, and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns supplied by the 

Metropolitan Water Works, ........ 182 

Table No. 34. — Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above Boston City Base for 

each Month at Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works during 1919, 183 
Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1919, . . . . . . 185 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1919, 188 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 6, 1920, . . 193 

Appendix No. 6. — Legislation of the Year 1919 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board 199 



Meteopolitan Disteict Commission. 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented 
to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, 
expenditures, disbursements, assets and liabilities of the Metropoli- 
tan Water and Sewerage Board for the fiscal year ending on Novem- 
ber 30, 1919, and now presents a detailed statement of the doings 
of said Board and its successor, the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission, for the calendar year ending on December 31, 1919. Said 
Board was abolished by Chapter 350 of the General Acts of 1919 
and its powers, duties and responsibilities transferred to said Com- 
mission bv the terms of said Act. 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Board, Officees and Employees. 

The term of office of Edward A. McLaughlin expired on March 20 
and he was reappointed for the term of three years next succeeding. 
At the end of the fiscal year the Board consisted of Henry P. Wal- 
cott, chairman, Edward A. McLaughlin and James A. Bailey. 
William N. Davenport continued as secretary, Alfred F. Bridgman 
as purchasing agent and Miss Alice G. Mason as bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, a first clerk, two general clerks, two sten- 
ographers and clerks, a telephone operator, and a janitor with two 
assistants, both of whom act as watchmen. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as have been called for during the year 
have been performed by George D. Bigelow. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The consulting engineers of the Board have been Hiram F. Mills 
and Frederic P. Stearns, who were called upon for services when 
matters arose which required their consideration. 

Mr. Stearns died at the close of the year. From the date of his 
appointment in 1887 as Engineer of the State Board of Health he 
had been intrusted with the active consideration of some of the most 
vital questions affecting the Metropolitan District. 

The investigations which led to the adoption of the present Metro- 
politan Water Supply, the treatment of the sewage disposal of the 
District and the improvement of the Charles River Basin with its 
development into one of the most attractive features of the Metro- 
politan Park System, indicate in some measure the scope of his 
varied and always useful efforts. 

There was no doubt in any mind that he was the one person most 
competent to carry out the work of construction of the Metropolitan 
Water System, which he as Engineer of the State Board of Health 
had had so large a share in designing, and until the completion of the 
most important works of construction he was the Chief Engineer of 
the Metropolitan Water Board and its successor, the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board. He was also in active charge of the 
many important tasks imposed by legislation upon the Board in con- 
nection with the proposed extensions of the systems of water supply 
and sewerage. 

Upon the completion of the larger works of the Metropolitan 
Water System he resigned his office and entered upon the general 
practice of his profession as consulting engineer. He was at once 
appointed one of the consulting engineers of the Board and rendered 
until his death services of the most valuable character. 

It is unnecessary to rehearse the distinctions of his later life; they 
were gained in many fields and will remain permanent monuments to 
his memory. 

On behalf of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board the 
Metropolitan District Commissioner desires to make record of the 
loss of a most competent adviser, of a much beloved associate and 
of a citizen always animated by a sincere and unselfish devotion to 
the public interests. 

William E. Foss is Chief Engineer of Water Works and John L. 
Howard, Assistant to the Chief Engineer. The following are superin- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

tendents of departments under the direction of the Chief Engineer: 
Eliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the Wachusett Department; 
Frank S. Hart, who succeeded Charles E. Haberstroh on his retire- 
ment on February 12, 1919, Superintendent of the Sudbury and 
Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston Aqueduct above 
the Weston Reservoir; Samuel E. Killam, Superintendent in charge 
of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct, and of all distributing reservoirs and pipe lines within the 
Metropolitan Water District; and Arthur E. O'Neil, Superintendent 
of the several water works pumping stations. 

The average engineering force employed on construction and main- 
tenance during the year has included, in addition to the Chief 
Engineer, 1 assistant to Chief Engineer, 4 department superintend- 
ents, 1 division engineer, 7 assistant engineers and 31 others in 
various engineering capacities, and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, 
stenographers and messengers, the total force numbering 45. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 288, has been required at the pumping stations, upon reser- 
voirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and upon minor construction work. At 
the end of the year this force numbered 285. 

Frederick D. Smith is Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works. He has 
been assisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer in charge of the 
office and drafting, by 4 assistant engineers and by 13 others em- 
ployed in different engineering capacities, and by two stenographers 
and clerks. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage Works 
was 23. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers, 
on the average has been 152. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end of 
the year numbered 174, of whom the Chief Engineer and 16 assist- 
ants and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and of 
the remainder, 93 were employed upon the North System and 64 
upon the South System. 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts on the 
Sewerage Works during the year was for the week ending August 10, 
when the number amounted to 60. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of Bos- 
ton, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, Quincy, 
Revere and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Lex- 
ington, Milton, Nahant, Stoneham, Swampscott, Watertown and 
Winthrop, — in all 10 cities and 9 towns. The District has an area 
of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities having been ad- 
mitted into the District during the year. Its population, according to 
the State Census taken for April 1, 1915, was 1,201,300. The popula- 
tion of the District on July 1, 1919, the date upon which calculations 
for the Water Works are based, was estimated as 1,313,070. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition of 
the Metropolitan Water Works since the passage of the Metropolitan 
Water Act in the year 1895 has been $43,257,951.63. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been $100,880.98. 
The details of this expenditure are as follows : — For the construction 
of a 12-inch metropolitan water main in West Roxbury and under 
Neponset River to provide an additional water supply for the town 
of Milton and the Hyde Park district of the city of Boston, the sum 
of $11,589.18; to provide an additional water main for the supply of 
the East Boston district of the city of Boston, $29,357.77; the con- 
struction of a 16-inch metropolitan water main to provide an addi- 
tional supply of water for the town of Lexington, $34,871.75; for the 
completion of the work of providing an additional water supply for 
Watertown and Belmont, $5,619.54; for the relocation of meters and 
connections, $13,018.34; and for other minor works, stock on hand, 
administration and engineering expenses, the sum of $6,424.40. 

The work of relocating Venturi meters on pipe lines acquired from 
the city of Boston and of making additional connections, which had 
not been completed owing to shortage of labor, was resumed early in 
the year, but on account of heavy street traffic and numerous under- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

ground structures progress was necessarily slow so that the work has 
not been entirely completed. 

The contract for the construction of an additional 36-inch low- 
service pipe line to provide an additional water supply for East 
Boston was made in August and the work completed late in Novem- 
ber. The new pipe line was connected with the distribution system 
and put into service on December 18. 

The work of laying a 16-inch northern extra high-service pipe line 
to provide an additional water supply for the town of Lexington was 
begun in September and all but a small portion of the line had been 
completed at the end of the year. On account of delay in receiving 
pipes from the foundry, the remaining work will be done by water 
works employees early in 1920. 

The construction of the southern extra high-service 12-inch pipe 
line in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, for the reinforcement of the 
water supply of Hyde Park and Milton, parallel with a similar pipe 
line owned by the city of Boston and used jointly with the Com- 
monwealth, was completed with the exception of resurfacing the 
street. This was deferred until spring on account of unfavorable 
weather. The new pipe line will be connected with the distribution 
system early in 1920. It was necessary to delay the laying of the 
flexible jointed pipes under the Neponset River on account of short- 
age of labor and unfavorable weather. 

IV. WATER WORKS ^-MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the past calendar year have required the expenditure of 
$643,795.85. 

(1) Storage Reservoirs. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached its highest eleva- 
tion, 395.93, on May 23, 0.93 of a foot above high-water mark. 
From that time the water subsided until it reached elevation 389.59 
on November 1. At the end of the year the water had reached ele- 
vation 392.03, the highest elevation attained at the end of any year. 

The Sudbury Reservoir was about 0.76 of a foot below the crest 
of the overflow at the beginning of the year. Flashboards were put 
in place April 18 and the water allowed to rise until it was 1.25 feet 
above the crest on June 5. Flashboards were removed from the 



6 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

overflow November 21 and at the end of the year the water was 0.99 
of a foot below the crest. The level of the water in Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3 varies somewhat on account of the discontinuance 
of the discharge of water into it from Sudbury Reservoir at times 
when the Sudbury power station is not in operation. The flashboards 
were kept on the overflow all the year and the elevation of the water 
in the reservoir varied from 182.53 to 186.84. Water was drawn 
from Lake Cochituate for the water supply from January 28 to 
April 3. 

It has not been necessary to draw water for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs. 

(2) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during the 
whole or portions of 292 days. The quantity of water flowing 
through the aqueduct was equal to an average of 92,336,000 gallons 
per day for the entire year, which is 16,331,000 gallons less than the 
daily average flow in 1918. All of the water drawn from the reser- 
voir into the aqueduct was used before its admission for the develop- 
ment of electric energy. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir every day in the year, the daily average for the 
whole year being 65,568,000 gallons, a decrease of 9,065,000 gallons 
per day from that discharged in 1918. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use 303 days, the quantity of water 
delivered through the aqueduct being equivalent to a daily average 
of 47,509,000 gallons, a decrease of 3,303,000 gallons from that de- 
livered in the previous year. 

Water was discharged through the Cochituate Aqueduct on 65 
days during the year, the total quantity being 713,900,000 gallons. 

(3) Pumping Stations. 
The total amount of water pumped at all the pumping stations 
was 29,393,480,000 gallons, which is 3,800,890,000 gallons, or 11.45 
per cent, less than in the previous year. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



The following are the several pumping stations: 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Chestnut Hill high-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Spot Pond station, 
Arlington station, 
Hyde Park station, 



66,000,000 

105,000,000 

40,000,000 

30,000,000 

6,000,000 

6,000,000 



138 
60 
130 
125 
290 
140 



The amount expended for the operation of the stations was $195,- 
964.08, which is $1,573.10 more than for the year 1918. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 10,028.28 
gross tons, of which 7,128.66 tons were bituminous and 2,899.62 tons 
anthracite. All the anthracite coal was screenings.. The average cost 
of bituminous coal in the bins at the various stations varied from 
$6.63 to $7.79, and the average cost of anthracite coal varied from 
$2.90 to $5.91 per gross ton. 

(4) Protection of the Water Supply. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, located in the southerly part 
of Marlborough, the Sterling filter-beds at Sterling, as well as the 
smaller filter-beds near Sterling Junction, the Worcester County 
Training School at West Boylstori and the swimming pool at South- 
borough, have been in successful operation and required only the 
usual attention during the year. 

The Pegan Brook pumping station, located in Natick, at which is 
pumped upon the filter-beds the surface drainage of about one square 
mile in the thickly settled portions of that town, was in operation on 
272 days in the year. 

The Sanitary Inspector and his assistants and members of the 
maintenance force have maintained a constant inspection of the 
watersheds. 

Chemical examinations of the waters used were made by the State 
Department of Health, and in addition, microscopical and bacterial 
examinations were made by the Board. These examinations enable 
the Board to take measures to remedy any difficulties which are 
found to exist. 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The quality of the water brought to the Metropolitan District con- 
tinues to be satisfactory both in taste and appearance. This condi- 
tion results in a large measure from the fact that it is still possible 
to reject some of the sources which were in use before the extension 
of the water works to the South Branch of the Nashua River. The 
water derived from the Wachusett watershed has been superior to 
that coming from the Sudbury and Cochituate sources. The first- 
named supply, so far as possible, has been that conveyed to the 
District; the others have been wasted to a greater or less extent as 
occasion has permitted. 

The time is approaching when all the sources will be required for 
the supply of the District. When that time arrives it may be neces- 
sary to filter the less desirable waters in order to bring them to the 
standard of excellence to which the District has become accustomed 
since the establishment of the Metropolitan Water System. 

During the year the Board acquired the fee of 50 acres of land in 
Boylston, 13.43 acres in Sterling and 17.86 acres in West Boylston 
for the protection and improvement of the water supply. 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works. 

The Board continued the operation of the works for the disposal 
of the sewage of the town of Clinton on lands acquired for the pur- 
pose in the town of Lancaster, under authority of Chapter 557 of the 
Acts of the year 1898. 

The quantity of sewage pumped to the filter-beds averaged 103,000 
gallons per day more than in 1918 and the cost of filtration was $7.61 
per million gallons more than in the previous year. This high cost 
of filtration was due in part to higher wages and increased cost of 
supplies, but largely to the condition of the filters which have been 
overworked for some time. This condition has been chiefly brought 
about by the large amount of ground water and greasy mill wastes 
which now enter the Clinton sewers and could be materially improved 
at small expense if the town of Clinton, under authority of Chapter 
433 of the Acts of 1909, would order all surface water drains dis- 
connected from the sewers and require the large manufacturing com- 
panies to keep greasy wastes from wool washing processes out of the 
same. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

(6) Wachusett Power Plant. 
The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was oper- 
ated on 279 days during the year. The energy not used in connec- 
tion with the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works was sold 
to the New England Power Company and the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company under a contract which provided for the 
construction of a 66,000-volt transmission line between the Wachusett 
and Sudbury power stations, to make possible the most advan- 
tageous use of the power. This line had not been put into regular 
service at the end of the year. As in the previous year, all the 
water from the reservoir used for water supply purposes has been 
used to generate electric energy. The operation of the plant con- 
tinues to be successful, the gross earnings for the year being $40,- 
491.12. The cost of operating the plant has been $24,162.36, the net 
earnings $16,328.76, and the net earnings per thousand kilowatt 
hours sold $2,145. 

(7) Sudbury Power Plant. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Sudbury Dam was oper- 
ated on 303 days during the year. The entire output, with the 
exception of a small amount of energy used for lighting the station 
and operating the electrically driven accessories, has been sold to the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston under a contract 
made in 1914. The gross earnings for the year were $32,736.58, the 
cost of operating the plant $17,272.33, and the net earnings $15,- 
464.25. The net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours sold were 
$2,952. 

(8) Forestry. 

Parcels of water works land in Sterling, west of the North Dike 
and on Beaman Street, West Boylston, aggregating 38 acres, which 
had been planted and since burned and cleared for planting again, 
were replanted with 35,700 four-year-old Scotch pine seedlings and 
1,700 seven-year-old white pine seedlings; and 38 acres along the 
margins of the Wachusett Reservoir in Clinton, Sterling and West 
Boylston were filled in where the original trees had failed with 11,200 
five-year-old white pine seedlings from the Oakdale nursery. 

Twenty-two acres of land bordering on the Wachusett Reservoir 
and tributary streams, which had been recently burned over or were 
grown to chestnut trees seriously damaged by the chestnut bark 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

disease or infested with gypsy moths, were cleared for planting with 
pine seedlings. 

Sprouts and undergrowth, which were interfering with the pines 
planted during the last few years, were cleared from about 98 acres 
of land along the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct; thinning 
was made on 3 acres of timber land on the margin of the Wachusett 
Reservoir; and the improvement thinning begun and carried on in 
previous years of a portion of Big Crane Swamp in Westborough was 
continued, about 3 acres being improved. 

There are now in the Oakdale nursery 119,250 seedlings from two 
to eight years old. 

Since the beginning of forestal work on Wachusett Reservoir mar- 
ginal lands 1,523 acres have been planted. 

A marginal strip 100 feet in width along main highways bordering 
water works land around the Wachusett Reservoir was cleared of all 
brush and undergrowth and trees were trimmed, as a means of pre- 
venting roadside grass fires from spreading to improved and planted 
water works land. At the end of the year 99 acres along 6 J miles of 
highway had been thus improved. 

From the Sudbury Reservoir nursery 54,300 white pine seedlings 
were planted on cleared land on Farm Road; 42,000 on Pine Hill; 
11,400 on A. J. Newton land; and 10,000 four-year-old and 4,350 
two-year-old seedlings were used to replace trees lost by fire and for 
filling in at the Sudbury Reservoir. 

There were also 3,750 pines used to replace dead trees on the 
southerly shore of Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and 5,000 used at 
different points about Lake Cochituate. 

About 85 acres of woodland at Pine Hill and near Farm Road at 
the Sudbury Reservoir were cleared in preparation for setting out 
pine seedlings. 

Along the Weston Aqueduct 6,500 four-year-old pine seedlings and 
along the Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts 4,200 seedlings have 
been planted during the year. 

The work of attempting to check the spread of the pine-tree weevil, 
gypsy moth and elm-leaf beetle has been continued as far as practi- 
cable by spraying, painting egg clusters and burning moth nests. 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply. 

The rainfall for the year was above the average, and somewhat 
more than in the preceding year. On the Wachusett watershed the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

rainfall was 49.05 inches, on the Sudbury watershed 45.64 inches and 
on the Cochituate watershed 46.07 inches, while the averages for the 
periods covered by the records have been, respectively, 44.87 inches, 
44.53 inches and 45.14 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded a daily average of 1,257,000 
gallons per square mile, which is 18.25 per cent above the average 
for the past twenty-three years; the Sudbury watershed yielded a 
daily average of 988,000 gallons per square mile, which is 1.33 per 
cent above the average for the past forty-five years; and the 
Cochituate watershed yielded a daily average of 1,056,000 gallons 
per square mile, which is 14.91 per cent above the average for the 
past fifty-seven years. 

(10) Water Consumption. 

During the year the quantity of water supplied to the Metro- 
politan Water District amounted to a daily average of 120,593,500 
gallons as measured by the Metropolitan Water Works meters, which 
was equivalent to 95 gallons for each person in the District. This 
quantity was 9,170,500 gallons less than the average daily consump- 
tion of the preceding year. This decrease seems to have been partly 
due to the reduced industrial activity resulting from the termination 
of the war and to the mild winter. It is anticipated that a still 
further reduction may be made in the future when the work of in- 
stalling meters on service pipes is completed. 

Acting under authority conferred by several statutes and arrange- 
ments which have been made, water has been supplied to a limited 
extent outside of the Metropolitan Water District. There has been 
drawn from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct for the 
use of the Westborough State Hospital a daily average quantity of 
176,400 gallons. The town of Framingham has, under the provisions 
of the statute, drawn indirectly from Farm Pond a daily average 
quantity of 480,822 gallons and directly from the Sudbury Aqueduct 
471,901 gallons. A portion of the town of Saugus has been supplied 
through the city of Revere with an average of 28,700 gallons daily. 
The United States Government, for use on Peddock's Island, has 
been supplied with a daily average of 55,600 gallons. The sums 
charged for the water thus supplied have amounted to $7,652.15. 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with 
December 1, 1918, and ending with November 30, 1919, was, in 
accordance with the requirements of Chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1919, in relation to the Metropolitan Water Works, 
is herewith presented. 

Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments. 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1920, $42,980,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works : — 
For the period prior to January 1, 1919, . . $257,336 86 
For the year ending December 31, 1919, . . 2,005 81 

259,342 67 

Receipt from the town of Swampscott for admission to District 

(St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1920, . . . $43,329,342 67 
Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 
Fund: — 
Payments prior to January 1, 1919, . . $43,157,070 65 
Approved for year ending December 31, 1919, 100,880 98 

43,257,951 63 

Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1920, . $71,391 04 

(2) Total W t ater Debt, December 31, 1919. 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3£ per cent), $41,398,000 00 

Serial bonds (3|, 4 and 4i per cent), 1,515,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1919, .... $42,913,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1919, . . $141,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1919, 37,000 00 

178,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1919, . . $42,735,000 00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



Gross water debt, 

Sinking fund December 31, 1919, ...... 

Net water debt December 31, 1919, . . 

A decrease for the year of $909,710.30. 



$42,735,000 00 
15,904,545 14 

$26,830,454 86 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December 31, 1919. 



Year. 



Authorized 
Loans. 



Bonds 

issued (Sinking 
Fund). 



Bonds 

issued (Serial 

Bonds). 



Sinking Fund. 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 
1918, 
1919, 



$27,000,000 



13,000,000 



500,000 

398,000 
900,000 
80,000 
212,000 
600,000 
108,000 



115,000 
67,000 



$5,000,000 
2,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,000,000 
1,000,000 

10,000,000 
3,500,000 
1,500,000 
2,500,000 
650,000 
1,350,000 



398,000 
500,000 



$200,000 
190,000 

258,000 

490,000 

66,000 

150,000 

161,000 



$42,980,000 



$41,398,000 



$1,515,000 



$226,286 05 

699,860 70 

954,469 00 

1,416,374 29 

1,349,332 97 

1,573,619 72 

1,662,426 95 

2,256,803 81 

2,877,835 59 

3,519,602 92 

4,207,045 69 

4,897,822 62 

5,643,575 69 

6,419,283 28 

7,226,262 31 

8,089,902 91 

8,953,437 44 

9,829,356 80 

10,767,701 68 

11,533,453 45 

12,491,245 25 

13,268,199 36 

14,036,278 88 

14,870,834 84 

15,904,545 14 



14 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(4) Water Assessment, 1919. 

The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 

Sinking fund requirements, $261,966 36 

Serial bonds, $43,000 00 

Less premium, 32 20 

42,967 80 

Interest, 1,490,743 33 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, $647,200 00 

Less balance on hand, 5,431 74 

641,768 26 

Total water assessment for 1919, $2,437,445 75 

In accordance with Chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and 
the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of 
the total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the 
city of Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the 
Metropolitan Works. 

The division of the assessment for 1919 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns. 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Milton, 



Assessment. 



$24,320 83 
12,596 72 
1,805,104 07 
58,145 27 
58,298 82 
9,720 54 
57,579 78 
41,326 89 
22,670 68 
12,925 78 



Cities and Towns. 

Nahant, .... 

Newton 

Quincy, .... 

Revere, .... 

Somerville, 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, . 

Watertown, 

Winthrop, 



Assessment. 



$4,567 76 
6,210 62 
78,083 57 
34,950 55 
128,082 90 
10,437 14 
13,267 02 
40,517 66 
18,639 15 



$2,437,445 75 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 
District and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1919 under the provisions 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as follows: — 

Town of Framingham, . $5,945 04 

City of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

town of Saugus for 1918), 800 00 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island), .... 1,429 29 

Westborough State Hospital, 1,855 20 

$10,029 53 

The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the District; but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works: — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 


Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

Distribution system : — 
Low service: — 
Section 46 (additional water supply for the East Boston district of the city 

Southern high service: — 
Section 47 (additional water supply for Watertown and Belmont), . 

Northern extra high service : — 

New pumping engine at Arlington pumping station, .... 

Section 45 (additional water supply for the town of Lexington), 
Southern extra high service: — 

Section 44 (additional water supply for the town of Milton and the Hyde 
Park district of the city of Boston), 


$3,180 96 

$29,357 77 

5,019 54 
600 00 

1,145 08 
34,871 75 

11,589 18 
13,018 34 






Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 


$98,782 62 
$12,131 89 
10,033 53 

o nnq oc 


Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1919 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1920, . 


$100,880 98 
43,157,070 65 

$43,257,951 63 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Administration, ............ 

General supervision, 

Taxes and other expenses, 

Wachusett Department: — 

Superintendence, ' . . . . 

Reservoir, 

Forestry, 

Protection of supply, ........... 

Buildings and grounds 

Wachusett Dam 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system: — 

Pumping station, 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, . . . . . . . . . . • . 

Power plant, ............. 

Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission Line 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, . 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, ........... 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, . . . . . . . . 

Marlborough Brook filters 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Forestry, 

Power plant, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence, ........... 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropria- 
tions, ............. 

Emergency pumping, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, . 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, 

Amounts carried forward, .......... 



$11,236 44 

18,109 78 

12,620 71 

8,841 66 

5,464 53 

7,281 47 

11,754 18 

1,988 13 

14,012 98 

291 09 

5,772 43 

21,641 00 

239 01 

367 72 



$12,224 20 


3,217 56 


3,083 68 


2,302 24 


10,473 88 


8,550 88 


7,450 65 


2,208 09 


6,596 14 


2,523 92 


3,884 61 


3,173 81 


7,071 38 


6,043 42 


9,231 01 


9,418 01 


351 64 



$8,988 61 



6,982 21 



$15,522 15 
39,312 65 
45,227 28 



119,621 13 



97,805 12 



765 91 


3,029 25 


13,666 72 


93,672 04 


39,289 77 


27,364 85 


11,193 33 



$204,952 69 $317,488 33 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



Maintenance and Opekation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Distribution Department — Con. 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

. Chelsea Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds, 

Fells Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 

Mystic Reservoir, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir 

Spot Pond, . . 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, * 

Northern high service, 

Northern extra high service 

Southern high service, 

Southern extra high service, ......... 

Supply pipe lines, . . . 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings 

Stables 

Venturi meters, 

Measurement of water 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, . 

Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds, . . . 

Fisher Hill Reservoir 

Belle vue Reservoir, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Total for maintaining and operating works, 



,952 69 $317,488 33 



298 70 

571 93 
13,715 63 
1,436 80 
2,517 61 
1,471 81 
5,590 02 

338 90 
4,793 70 
9,387 65 
1,833 76 

31,740 94 
6,874 70 

193 88 
7,872 92 

154 26 
1,368 77 
4,802 89 
3,307 12 
3,524 16 
9,731 29 
1,717 54 
2,788 78 

860 02 

228 27 
3,465 54 

123 52 

643 72 
326,307 52 



$643,795 85 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the re- 
quirements of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of 
the expenditures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for 
the year 1919. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1919, and ending December 31, 1919, was $100,880.98, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the 



18 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1919, 
has been $43,257,951.63. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $643,795.85. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of 
administration, have been apportioned to the construction of the 
works and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and 
appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

A dministra Hon . 

Commissioners, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering . 

Principal assistant engineers, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Stationery and printing, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, . 
Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings: — 

Main office 

Rent and taxes, main office, ..... 

Unclassified supplies, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Construction. 
Preliminary work: — 

Advertising, 

Contracts, Distribution System: — 
F. A. Mazzur & Co., for furnishing and installing a centrifugal pumping unit 
at the northern extra high-service pumping station at Arlington, Mass., 

Contract 382, 

Michele DeSisto, for laying water pipes on Section 47, southern high service 

(additional water supply for Watertown and Belmont), Contract 387, 
U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings, Contract 388, 

Amounts carried forward, .......... 



$1,583 34 

1,172 91 

188 72 

20 00 

153 22 

59 77 

3 00 



$769 66 

2,375 12 

1,485 98 

2 04 

97 97 

25 

51 91 

459 78 

179 30 

70 00 

34 70 



$970 00 
4,699 53 

7.778 82 



$3,180 96 



5,526 71 



60 50 



$13,448 35 



5,768 17 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Construction — Con. 
Contracts, Distribution System — Con. 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., for furnishing screw-lift valves used in the con- 
struction of Section 44 of the southern extra high service (additional 
water supply for the town of Milton and the Hyde Park district of the 
city of Boston), Contract 391 (in part), 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., for furnishing screw-lift valves used in the con- 
struction of Section 45 of the northern extra high service (additional 
water supply for the town of Lexington), Contract 391 (in part), . 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., for furnishing screw-lift valves used in the con- 
struction of Section 46 of the low service (additional water supply for the 
East Boston district of the city of Boston), Contract 391 (in part), 

Gibby Foundry Co., for furnishing manhole frames and covers, Contract 
392, 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings, for use on Section 44 of the southern extra high service 
(additional water supply for the town of Milton, Mass., and the Hyde 
Park district of the city of Boston), Contract 393 (in part), . 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings for use on Section 45 of the northern extra high service 
(additional water supply for the town of Lexington, Mass.), Contract 
393 (in part), .... 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings for use on Section 46 of the low service (additional water 
supply for the East Boston district of the city of Boston), Contract 393 
(in part) , 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings, Contract 393 (in part), 

Vincenzo Grande, for laying water pipes in West Embury, Mass., Section 
44 of the southern extra high service (additional water supply for the 
town of Milton and the Hyde Park district of the city of Boston), Con- 
tract 394, 

James Barletta for laying water pipes in Arlington, Mass., Section 45 of the 
northern extra high service (additional water supply for the town of 
Lexington, Mass.), Contract 395, 

Coleman Bros., for laying water pipes in Chelsea, Mass., Section 46 of the low 
service (additional water supply for the East Boston district of the city 
of Boston) , Contract 396, 

Additional work: — 
Labor, .............. 

Freight and express, 

Traveling, ....'. 

Castings, ironwork and metals, . . . . . . 

Iron pipe and valves 

Lumber and field buildings, 

Brick, cement and stone 

Drain pipe, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$13,448 35 $8,768 17 



820 00 

1,590 00 

3,300 00 
655 70 

3,583 39 

14,916 69 

13,979 06 
3,287 37 

2,761 59 

13,127 42 

7,441 81 



$7,767 53 


3,351 00 


20 


122 15 


410 00 


156 76 


341 60 


22 18 


$12,171 42 



1,911 38 



$87,679 55 



20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amounts brought forward, .... 

Construction — Con. 
Additional work — Con. 
Municipal and corporation work, . 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Real Estate. 
Legal and expert: — 
Conveyancing expenses, .... 

Settlements made by the Board, . 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1919, . 
Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1920, 



Maintenance and Operation of Works, 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, " 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage 

Express and telegrams, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Amount carried forward, ...... 



812,171 42 $87,679 55 



389 12 




9 49 




5 00 






12,575 03 




$26 40 




600 00 






626 40 






$100,880 98 




43,157,070 65 




$43,257,951 63 



$4,666 66 

7,336 13 

767 01 

4 21 

83 04 

70 82 

581 28 

129 00 

1,412 53 

135 27 

198 21 

137 99 



$15,522 15 



$30,667 61 

2,301 10 
301 67 
249 16 
220 75 

1,744 56 
132 16 
185 85 

1,269 88 
468 06 
707 87 

1,063 98 



39,312 65 



$54,834 80 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



21 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amount brought forward, 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence, 

Labor, 

Fuel, . . , . ... 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs, 

Small supplies, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 
Emergency pumping, 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, . . . 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Labor, pay roll, 

Labor, miscellaneous, 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, . . . . 
Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, . 

Automobiles, . ... . . 

Brick, 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Cement and lime . . . . . 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Electrical supplies, 

Fertilizer and planting material, . 

Freight and express, ' 

Fuel, 

Gypsy moth supplies, 

Hardware, 

Hay and grain 

Lighting, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, ............. 

Paints and oils, 

Pipe and fittings, ............ 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rubber and oiled goods, .......... 

Stable expenses, 

Sand, gravel and stone 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Amounts carried forward, .......... 



$6,982 21 

103,991 93 

58,848 95 

3,387 41 

16,779 62 

2,178 80 

765 91 

3,029 25 



$7,903 64 

17,067 58 

3,418 04 

229,275 96 

4,362 42 

2,530 62 

4,525 05 

12,534 83 

172 50 

546 55 

1,704 38 

915 92 

674 06 

5,859 31 

2,195 09 

858 68 

3,686 75 

2,495 12 

2,061 87 

1,323 90 

323 51 

1,649 56 

2,789 29 

1,936 83 

1,245 88 

104 22 

1,577 93 

644 31 

746 14 

341 92 

3,487 64 

1,300 39 

5,184 90 

3,836 86 

122 23 

3,921 57 



$54,834 80 



195,964 08 



$333,325 45 $250,798 88 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Contracts: — 
Boston Structural Steel Co., Contract 65-M, for furnishing and delivering 
1,165 linear feet of picket fence complete at Mystic Reservoir in Medford, 
Mass., 

Improvement and protection of water supplies, 

Water from city of Worcester, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Payments in lieu of taxes, . 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



$333,325 45 $250,798 88 



2,029 00 




5,488 56 




5,563 60 




1,363 08 






347,769 69 
45,227 28 






$643,795 85 



(b) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1919, 
and ending December 31, 1919, was $100,637.94, and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1919, has been $1,599,015.64. The 
general character of these receipts is as follows : — 



General Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Applicable to the loan fund: — 

Land and buildings, 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 
of maintenance and operation: — 
Proceeds from operations of the Board: — 

Rents 

Land products, 

Electric energy, 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, .... 
Interest and unclassified receipts 

Applicable to the sinking fund: — 
Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others, 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1919, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1920, 



$250 00 
1,755 81 



$2,005 81 



$3,847 00 




7,602 53 




71,901 08 




5,114 01 




137 98 






88,602 60 






10,029 53 




$100,637 94 




1,498,377 70 




$1,599,015 64 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Supplying water outside of Water District, 
Construction and acquisition of works: — 

Administration, 

Sudbury Reservoir, ....... 

Distribution system 

Maintenance and operation of works: — 

Administration, 

General supervision, ....... 

Wachusett Aqueduct, ....... 

Wachusett Reservoir, ....... 

Wachusett electric power plant, 

Sudbury system, 

Sudbury electric power plant, 

Distribution system, 

Clinton sewerage system, ...... 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1919, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1920, .... 



$70 87 

250 00 

1,755 36 



$286 15 

369 06 

465 13 

6,496 01 

40,422 14 

2,392 50 

31,609 22 

5,395 11 

1,096 86 



110,029 53 



2,076 23 



5,532 18 



$100,637 94 
1,498,377 70 

$1,599,015 64 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Commission : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 

There are sundry bills for current expenses which have not yet 
been received. 



24 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


Joseph Hanreddy, .... 


Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Mains, in Newton, Mass. 


$10 00 


Warren Foundry & Machine Co., 


Contract 393 for furnishing cast-iron water pipes 
and special castings for the Distribution System. 


6,311 74 


Vincenzo Grande, .... 


Contract 394, Section 44 of the southern extra high- 
service pipe line (additional water supply for the 
town of Milton and the Hyde Park district of the 
city of Boston). 


487 34 


James Barletta, 


Contract 395, Section 45 of the northern extra high- 
service pipe line (additional water supply for the 
town of Lexington). 


2,316 60 


Coleman Bros., 


Contract 396, Section 46 of the low-service pipe line 
(additional water supply for the East Boston 
district of the city of Boston). 


1,313 26 



Settlements are pending with the following parties for land and 
easements taken in lands owned by them: — 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, Frederique 
Ropp, Heirs of William H. Mason, Heirs of Ella Wood, Jack Calcia. 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Revere, 
Somerville and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Read- 
ing, Stoneham, Wakefield, Winchester and Winthrop and parts of the 
city of Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in all 10 
cities and 8 towns, with an area of 100.32 square miles. The district 
has an estimated population, based upon the census of 1915, as of 
December 31, 1919, of 659,530. Of the total population it is esti- 
mated that 90.3 per cent, or 595,570 people, contribute sew r age to 
the North Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Milton, 
Watertown and Wellesley, and parts of the city of Boston and the 
towm of Dedham, — a total of 4 cities and 5 towns. This district 
has an area of 110.76 square miles, with an estimated population as 
of December 31, 1919, of 510,100. According to the estimates made 
79.9 per cent of this population, or 407,410, contribute sew r age to 
the South Metropolitan System. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 



(1) Noeth Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the North 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $112,531.93. 

The plan adopted by the joint commission in July, 1914, for the 
disposal of the sewage of the town of Reading has been so modified 
that by the construction of works for pumping the sewage into the 
metropolitan sewers a satisfactory disposal of the sewage of the 
town may be obtained for several years, at a cost within the original 
appropriation. The Board was given authority by the Legislature of 
1919 to construct these works and the work has been carried on 
during the year in accordance with this plan. Several sections of the 
sewer have been completed and it is expected that the extension will 
be ready for use before the end of the year. 

The Board acquired by taking during the year easements in 1.921 
acres of land in Woburn and Stoneham for the construction of the 
Reading Extension of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — 'Maintenance. 

The cost of the maintenance and operation of the North Metro- 
politan System during the past year was $234,588.14. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The metropolitan sewers in the North Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 65.375 miles, and the local sewers which are 
connected with the metropolitan sewers have a further length of 
779.65 miles, involving 85,705 connections. 

The sewage of the North Metropolitan District flows at first by 
gravity, but before being finally disposed of is lifted at different 
points by pumping and is finally discharged into the harbor from an 
outfall off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor 
was 70,300,000 gallons, a daily average for each person contribut- 
ing sewage of 118 gallons. The amount of sewage discharged was 
3,800,000 gallons per day more than the discharge of the preceding 
year. The maximum discharge in any one day was 153,200,000 gal- 
lons. 



26 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The pumping stations operated for the North Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Deer Island station (Boston Harbor), 
East Boston station, .... 
Charlestown station, .... 
Alewife Brook station (Somerville), . 



235,000,000 

235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 



19 

19 

11 

8 

13 



There were purchased for the operation of the pumping stations 
6,955 tons of bituminous coal, the average prices of which, at the 
different stations, varied from $8.21 to $8.76 per gross ton for the 
coal in the bins. 

The amount expended for the stations was $162,714.79. The 
average cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at the 
several stations was $0,198, a decrease of 7 per cent from the cost 
of last year. 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 
The amount expended for construction on account of the South 

Metropolitan System during the past year was $112,932.03. 

On account of the difficulties experienced in carrying on the work 
of constructing the Wellesley Extension of the High-level sewer, 
which have been noted in previous reports, the appropriations for 
the work were found inadequate for its completion. The Board was, 
accordingly, given authority to expend the further sum of $225,000 
by the Legislature of 1919 and work has been continued during the 
year. Of the nine sections into which the work was divided six are 
wholly and one about half completed. Contracts have been made 
for the construction of the remainder of the sewer with the exception 
of one section. 

The Board acquired by taking during the year easements in 1.846 
acres of land in Dedham for the construction of the Wellesley Ex- 
tension of the High-level sewer. 

(4) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan System 
during the past year was $143,336.83. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



27 



Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System, which 
comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and Neponset River 
valley sewer, as well as the new High-level sewer and extensions, 
have a total length of 49.545 miles, and with these are connected 
local sewers having a length of 666.43 miles, involving 46,928 con- 
nections. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Ward Street station (Roxbury District), 

Quincy station, 

Quincy sewerage lifting station, 



100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 



45 
28 
20 



The sewage of two small areas in Dorchester and Milton, included 
in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low for sewage 
to be delivered into the High-level sewer by gravity, is, under an 
arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through the Boston 
Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrangement the 
Commission is relieved from the expense of providing extra pumping 
facilities. 

A large part of the sewage of the South District is lifted into the 
High-level sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Roxbury. 
Most of the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into the High- 
level sewer at Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping station. 
All of the sewage of the South District is screened at the Nut Island 
screen-house for the purpose of intercepting solid matter, and is 
thence discharged at the bottom of the harbor from the outfalls 
about a mile off the island. 

The daily average amount of sewage thus discharged was 65,100,- 
000 gallons, and the maximum discharge in a single day was 144,- 
500,000 gallons. The increase in the daily average over last year was 
8,900,000 gallons. The daily average discharge of sewage for each 
individual contributing sewage in the district was 160 gallons. 

There were 2,903 gross tons of bituminous coal purchased at the 
two pumping stations and the Nut Island screen-house, the average 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

prices of which varied from $7.95 to $8.60 per gross ton for the coal 
in the bins. 

The total amount expended for the operation of the stations was 

$87,683.66. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with November 
30, 1919, was, as stated in connection with the Water Works, pre- 
sented to the General Court in January in accordance with the 
requirements of Chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix No. 5. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1919 is here- 
with presented in accordance with the provisions of the Act of 1906. 

(1) Metropolitan Seweeage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balances 
available on January 1, 1920, have been as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under various acts to January 1, 1920, for the 
construction of the North Metropolitan System and the 

various extensions, $7,512,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 

which are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan 

System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1919, . . $212 03 

For the period prior to January 1, 1919, . . 86,021 19 

86,233 22 

$7,598,598 95 
Amount approved for payment by the Board 1 out of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System: — 
For the year ending December 31, 1919, . . $112,53193 
For the period prior to January 1, 1919, . . 7,329,026 54 

7,441,558 47 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1920, . $157,040 48 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 



South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts to January 1, 1920, 
applied to the construction of the Charles River valley- 
sewer, Neponset valley sewer, High-level sewer and exten- 
sions, constituting the South Metropolitan System, . . $9,812,046 27 
Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System: — 
For the year ending December 31, 1919, . . $324 62 

For the period prior to January 1, 1919, . . 19,415 03 

19,739 65 



Amount approved by the Board for payment out of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System: — 
On account of the Charles River valley sewer, . $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . . 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and exten- 
sions, including Wellesley extension: — 
For the year ending December 

31, 1919, . . . . . $112,932 03 
For the period prior to January 

1, 1919, 7,767,746 79 

7,880,678 82 



),831,785 92 



9,592,256 55 

Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1920, . $239,529 37 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1919. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3£ per cent), $6,563,000 00 

Serial bonds (3i and 4 per cent), . . . . . . . 925,500 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1919, $7,488,500 00 

Serial bonds p?id prior to January 1, 1919, . . $101,500 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1919, 26,500 00 

128,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1919, . . . $7,360,500 00 

Gross sewerage debt, $7,360,500 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1919, 2,946,215 08 

Net sewerage debt December 31, 1919, $4,414,284 92 

A net decrease for the year of $282,223.18. 

South Metropolitan System. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent), $8,877,912 00 

Serial bonds (4 and 5 per cent), 720,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1919, $9,597,912 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1919, . . $42,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1919, 21,000 00 

63,000 00 



Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1919, . . . $9,534,912 00 

Gross sewerage debt, $9,534,912 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1919, 1,749,357 99 

Net sewerage debt December 31, 1919, $7,785,554 01 

A net decrease for the year of $190,644.39. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



31 



(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1919. 









Loans. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds 

(Serial 


ISSUED 

Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 


Yeab. 


North 
System. 


South 

System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North and 

South 
Systems. 


1889, . 


$5,000,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1890 






- 


- 


$2,200,000 


$800,000 


- 


- 


- 


1891 






- 


- 


368,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1892 






- 


- 


1,053,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1893 






- 


- 


579,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1894 






500,000 00 


- 


500,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1895 






300,000 00 


$500,000 00 


300,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1896 






30,000 00 


- 


30,000 


200,000 


- 


- 


- 


1897 






85,000 00 


300,000 00 


80,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1898 






215,000 00 


35,000 00 


220,000 


35,000 


- 


- 


- 


1899 






- ■ 


4,625,000 00 


- 


1,025,000 


- 


- 


$361,416 59 


1900 






265,000 00 


10,912 00 l 


265,000 


10,912 


- 


- 


454,520 57 


1901 






- 


40,000 00 


- 


2,040,000 


- 


- 


545,668 26 


1902 






- 


- 


- 


864,000 


- 


- 


636,084 04 


1903 






500,000 00 


1,000,000 00 


500,000 


1,736,000 


- 


- 


754,690 41 


1904 






- 


392,000 00 


- 


392,000 


- 


- 


878,557 12 


1905 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,008,724 95 


1906 






55,000 00 


1,175,000 00 


55,000 


175,000 


- 


- 


1,146,998 68 


1907 






- 


- 


- 


300,000 


- 


- 


1,306,850 30 


1908 






413,000 00 


- 


- 


700,000 


- 


- 


1,492,418 98 


1909 






- 


- 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,673,784 40 


1910 






56,000 00 


- 


113,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,931,741 89 


1911 






6,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,184,674 98 


1912 






378,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


$62,000 


- 


2,458,541 20 


1913 






- 


- 


- 


- 


378,000 


- 


2,749,337 90 


1914 






130,500 00 


350,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,011,512 44 


1915 






83,000 00 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


130,500 


- 


3,290,979 46 


1916 






285,000 00 


40,000 00 


- 


- 


70,000 


$355,000 


3,604,657 27 


1917 






- 


325,000 00 


- 


- 


285,000 


40,000 


3,925,792 75 


1918 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


325,000 


4,270,205 50 


1919 






- 


225,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,695,573 07 




$8,301,500 00 2 


$9,022,912 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




789,134 27 


789,134 27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 








$7,512,365 73 


$9,812,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$925,500 


$720,000 





1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 Of this amount, $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, which 
is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



32 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the appropria- 
tions for maintenance, and the expenditures for maintenance for the 
year ending December 31, 1919, were as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriation as follows : — 

Item 513, Chapter 153, Special Acts of 1919, . , . . . $260,000 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 2,076 66 



$262,076 66 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, 234,588 14 



Balance January 1, 1920, $27,488 52 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations as follows : — 

Item 514, Chapter 153, Special Acts of 1919, .... $147,000 00 

Item 514, Chapter 242, Special Acts of 1919, .... 5,000 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 376 51 



$152,376 51 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, 143,336 83 



Balance January 1, 1920, $9,039 68 

(5) Sewer Assessments, 1919. 

The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, $125,355 09 

Serial bonds, 24,000 00 

Interest, 232,992 76 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, $260,000 00 

Less balance on hand, 8,052 15 

251,947 85 



Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . . . $634,295 70 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Sinking fund requirements, $90,426 14 



Serial bonds, 

Interest, 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, 

Less balance on hand, 

Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, 



$152,000 00 
2,639 28 



21,000 00 
339,870 63 



149,360 72 
$600,657 49 



In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1919 were as follows: — 









North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 








Cities and Towns. 1 Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Arlington 


$18,507 75 


Reading, i 


$5,046 99 


Belmont, 










11,366 29 


Revere, . 










25,325 62 


Boston, . 










98,845 50 


Somerville, 










88,244 86 


Cambridge, 










133,430 27 


Stoneham, 










7,137 93 


Chelsea, . 










41,560 71 


Wakefield, 










13,573 05 


Everett, . 










40,722 67 


Winchester, 










14,797 67 


Lexington, 








• 


5,129 19 


Winthrop, 










15,191 94 


Maiden, . 










46,236 14 
33,634 25 


Woburn, . 
Total, 










16,830 49 


Medford, . 


$634,295 70 


Melrose, . 










18,714 38 







1 Reading is also assessed $7,000 for sinking fund requirements in accordance with Section 5, Chapter 
159, General Acts of 1916. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 



Boston, . 
Brookline, 
Dedham, 
Milton, 
Newton, . 



Assessment. 



$297,203 67 
80,153 13 
13,495 03 
17,262 17 
71,432 96 



Cities and Towns. 



Assessment. 



Quincy, . 
Waltham, 
Watertown, 
Wellesley, x 
Total, 



$50,273 57 
33,858 76 
25,876 30 
11,101 90 



,657 49 



1 Wellesley is also assessed $6,775.23 for sinking fund requirements in accordance with Section 5, Chapter 
343, Acts of 1914. 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, 

Reading extension: — 

Section 73, $23,295 99 

Section 74, 22,571 06 

Section 75, 7,771 99 

Section 76, 53,962 62 

Real estate settlements, 250 00 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 794 45 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1919, 
Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1920, 

South Metropolitan System. 
High-level sewer extensions : — 
Administration, ............ 

Wellesley extension: — 

Section 98 $19,576 21 

Section 99, 77,878 73 

Section 100, 121 12 

Section 101 556 66 

Section 103, 580 77 

Section 104 538 04 

Section 105, 264 29 

Section 106 10 40 

Real estate settlements, 8,975 00 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 604 34 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1919, .... 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1920, 
Total for construction, both systems, 



$3,885 82 



108,646 11 



$112,531 93 
7,329,026 54 

$7,441,558 47 



1,826 47 



109,105 56 



$112,932 03 
9,479,324 52 

$9,592,256 55 

$17,033,815 02 



Maintenance and Operation. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 




$234,588 14 
143,336 83 




$377,924 97 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 
The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the 
Metropolitan Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and 
disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending 
December 31, 1919: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Construction op Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 
North System Enlargement. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, f .......... 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Engineering and draughting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and draughting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . 

Construction: — 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, ; . . . . 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 

Bruno & Petitti, Contract 144, for constructing a part of Section 76 of the 
Reading Extension of the North Metropolitan System in Wakefield 
and Reading, 

Rendle-Stoddard Co., Contract 146, for constructing Section 73 of the 
Reading Extension of the North Metropolitan System in Woburn and 
Stoneham, 

Rendle-Stoddard Co., Contract 148, for constructing Section 74 of the 
Reading Extension of the North Metropolitan System in Stoneham, 

Real estate: — 

Settlements, 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Total for North Metropolitan System 



$1,406 67 


375 00 


1,541 49 


217 68 


185 09 


158 99 


90 


$833 34 


8,210 84 


323 00 


164 36 


115 27 


22 60 


54 10 


555 41 


477 00 


159 75 


$122 85 


278 50 


17,963 05 



$48,886 54 



$3,885 82 



10,915 67 



18,364 40 



14,958 74 




14,476 31 






78,321 59 




$250 00 




794 45 






1,044 45 






$112,531 93 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Deo. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



South Metropolitan System. 
High-level Sewer Extensions. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 
Stationery, printing and office supplies, 
Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Construction: — 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 

Rowe Contracting Co., Contract 139, for constructing Section 99 (in part) 
of the High-level sewer (Wellesley Extension) in Dedham, 

John P. Cavanagh Co., Contract 149, for constructing Section 99 (in part) 
of the High-level sewer (Wellesley Extension) in Dedham, 

George M. Bryne, under agreement dated October 23, 1916, for construct- 
ing Section 98 of the High-level sewer (Wellesley Extension) in West 
Roxbury and Dedham, 

Real estate: — 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Settlements, ' 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$1,343 33 
375 00 
1,567 74 
184 17 
196 24 
158 99 
1 00 



$625 00 


6,090 51 


2,360 65 


72 24 


1 85 


18 41 


94 80 


588 94 


477 00 


342 05 


$127 85 


6 00 


576 91 



$69,096 95 
901 00 

18,146 06 



$604 34 
8,975 00 



1,826 47 



10,671 45 



710 76 



U44 01 



9,579 34 



$112,932 03 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



37 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Maintenance and Operation op Works, 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, . . . 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, . . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 
Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, ...*..... 

Water, 

Packing, . . 

Repairs and renewals 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Amounts carried forward 



$1,916 67 




2,850 95 




238 50 




262 32 




38 00 




398 94 




45 65 




20 00 




45 95 






$5,816 98 




$6,930 52 




715 50 




787 24 




258 40 




136 97 




247 16 




27 32 






9,103 11 




$25,356 16 




17,958 82 




1,323 22 




1,431 60 




212 25 




1,633 44 




43 45 




846 43 




551 19 






49,^56 56 




$29,879 51 




24,586 35 




1,150 81 




1,830 00 




152 44 




2,656 50 




1 68 




1,133 72 




622 88 






62,013 89 




$20,731 76 




10,554 40 




438 60 




661 20 




25 60 




$32,411 56 


$126,290 54 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amounts brought forward, 



North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Charlestown pumping station — Con. 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Alewife Brook pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Engineering assistants, . 

Labor 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Freight, express and teaming, 
Fuel and lighting, .... 
Jobbing and repairing, . 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, . 

Paints and oils 

Rubber and oiled goods, 
Sand, gravel and stone, . 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, .... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



$32,411 56 $126,290 54 



730 36 

49 16 

320 41 

158 90 



$10,460 47 

5,693 60 

500 64 

299 04 

57 55 

319 56 

39 08 

174 17 

129 84 



$2,183 52 

36,298 06 

817 09 

603 96 

1,042 26 

4 49 

71 21 

254 07 

2,384 51 

1,395 46 

1,174 80 

187 73 

82 49 

94 21 

892 57 

1,539 19 

189 71 



33,670 39 



17,673 95 



49,215 33 
4,822 02 
2,915 91 

$234,588 14 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



General. Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Administration : — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, . . . • . 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 
Printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Telephones, . . . . 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor, . . 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, f 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, ........ 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing 

Amounts carried forward,. .... 



$1,916 66 

2,239 92 

206 70 

246 97 

20 00 

331 40 

29 58 

51 65 

49 80 



$4,852 70 
620 10 



740 98 


119 98 


88 76 


212 24 


22 13 


$31,176 53 


16,826 84 


484 90 


1,795 20 


2 30 


4,512 57 


50 69 


1,514 32 


786 75 


$10,303 95 


2,949 24 


150 48 


320 42 


74 73 


477 10 


37 16 


476 76 


288 63 





$10,520 60 

2,994 10 

180 67 

314 82 

21 21 



$5,092 68 



6,656 89 



57,150 10 



15,078 47 



$14,031 40 $83,978 14 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the year ending 
December 31, 1919. 



Amounts brought forward, 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Nut Island screen-house — Con. 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Fuel and lighting, 

Freight, express and teaming, 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

City of Boston for pumping, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$14,031 40 $83,978 14 



214 91 




49 80 




895 53 




263 45 






15,455 09 




$4,760 85 




23,616 17 




1,133 17 




103 04 




216 18 




21 70 




1 45 




13 25 




832 51 




851 81 




205 18 




29 45 




44 00 




39 81 




1,089 02 




684 88 




111 82 






33,754 29 






5,869 36 




3,746 95 




533 00 




$143,336 83 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



(6) Receipts. 
The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1919. 



Construction: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Sinking fund: — 
North Metropolitan System, 

Interest fund: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1919, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1920, 



$212 03 
324 62 



2,076 66 
376 51 



99 96 



67 51 
44 50 



$3,201 79 
150,663 77 



$153,865 56 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Commission : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected there- 
with. 

(d) Liabilities. 

There are sundry bills for current expenses which have not yet 
been received. 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


North System enlargement: — 








Rendle-Stoddard Co., 


Contract 146, 


Section 73, Reading Extension, 


$2,639 77 


Rendle-Stoddard Co., 


Contract 148, 


Section 74, Reading Extension, 


2,554 64 


High-level sewer extensions: — 








Timothy O'Connell, 


Contract 57, 


Section 82 (in part), .... 


60 00 


Rowe Contracting Co., 


Contract 139, 
tension. 


Section 99 (in part), Wellesley Ex- 


2,500 00 


John P. Cavanagh Co., . 


Contract 149, 
tension. 


Section 99 (in part), Wellesley Ex- 


159 00 



42 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Settlements are pending with the following parties for easements 
taken in lands owned by them: — 

Clifford M. Locke, Martha W. Burrage, Edward and Catherine 
Bingham, Katherine H. Rooney, Mary A. Read, Hannah E. Pond, 
Richard G. Wadsworth, Frank D. Chase, Devisees of Anna E. 
Chase, Stephen M. Weld, Lucia Beebe, Edward F. Gilman, Herbert 
M. Hopkins, Joseph E. Hopkins, George A. Forbes, Bear Hill 
Associates, Lawrence Minot and Moses Williams, Trustees, Frederick 
P. Royce and Francis Peabody, Trustees, Bessie C. Olson, William 
B. and Helen B. Stevens, Stella Gilker, Maurice McKenna, Michael 
Flynn, Sarah A. Brown, John B. Tidd, George A. Owen and George 
E. Merrifield, Mary A. Scally, Stoneham Branch Railroad. 

VIII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

In the abstract of the annual report for the year 1919 the following 
statement and recommendations were made:- — 

Attention has been called in previous reports to certain large expenditures 
in connection with some inevitable improvements and extensions of the Metro- 
politan Water System. 

The plan submitted by the State Board of Health in 1895, and accepted by 
the Legislature of the same year, showed a direct line of communication be- 
tween the proposed line to Weston and Spot Pond. As this connection could 
be avoided by pumping the Spot Pond supply from the Chestnut Hill reservoirs 
for a number of years, the question has not hitherto been brought definitely 
before the Legislature, but in order to furnish reliable and satisfactory service 
in the future under conditions which prevail at times of maximum consumption, 
it now seems advisable to provide for the construction of a large supply main 
from the Weston Aqueduct to the northern portion of the District, the supply 
of which would be seriously impaired by failure from any cause to operate the 
pumps at the Chestnut Hill stations. 

The estimated cost of this supply main from the terminal chamber of the 
Weston Aqueduct through Waltham to Arlington Centre and connecting with 
the two existing 30-inch mains at the old Mystic pumping station in Somerville 
is $1,800,000, or about three times the cost of a similar pipe line before the war. 
About two-thirds of the cost is for material and one-third for labor. It is recom- 
mended that authority be given to construct this pipe line, in order that the 
more necessary portions can be undertaken at an early date. 

The Arlington standpipe, built by the town of Arlington in 1894, was acquired 
by the Metropolitan Water Works in January, 1899, and is now used as a reser- 
voir to regulate the water pressure in Lexington and portions of Arlington and 
Belmont. As the standpipe was not constructed with a view to supplying the 
district beyond the boundaries of the town of Arlington, it has now become 
inadequate for such use and should be replaced by a larger structure, similar 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



43 



to that erected on Mt. Bellevue in West Roxbury for the southern extra high- 
service district, as proposed last year, and the recommendation is renewed that 
an appropriation of $175,000 be authorized for this purpose. 

The machinery at the Spot Pond pumping station includes three vertical 
fire tube boilers installed in 1899, a 300-horse-power vertical independent com- 
pound engine and a vertical triple expansion engine, which were installed in 
1900. 

The consumption of water in the northern high-service district has greatly 
increased since the pumping machinery at the Spot Pond station was installed 
and during periods of high consumption now exceeds the capacity of the com- 
pound engine, with which the supply is maintained when the other engine is 
out of service for any reason. To provide satisfactory service the installation 
of new machinery should be undertaken as soon as possible and it is recom- 
mended that an appropriation of $250,000 be authorized for this purpose. 

At the Chestnut Hill pumping stations there is one boiler over 20 years old 
and three others that will be 20 years old next year. There are also three boilers 
on which the allowed pressure has been reduced below the point where they 
can be satisfactorily used to operate the engines. 

The two horizontal compound duplex engines installed at this station in 
1887 have been in service for 31 years, are now worn out and should be replaced 
with modern high duty engines. To provide for this new southern high- 
service pumping machinery, it is recommended that an appropriation of $200,000 
be authorized so that the work can be begun next year. 

The portion of the cities of Somerville, Maiden and Medford supplied from 
the northern high-service works are now entirely dependent upon a single pipe 
line of inadequate capacity at times of maximum consumption. To remedy 
this condition and provide reliable and satisfactory service it is recommended 
that an appropriation of $280,000 be authorized for an additional northern 
high-service pipe line. 

On account of the large amount of ground water and greasy mill wastes 
which now enter the Clinton sewers, the existing nitration area, which is capable 
of properly purifying only 750,000 gallons per day of ordinary sewage, is over- 
loaded with more than 1,000,000 gallons per day of greasy sewage which cannot 
be properly purified with the existing works. If existing conditions are to con- 
tinue it is recommended that an appropriation of $60,000 be authorized for en- 
larging the Clinton sewerage works to meet the requirements of the situation. 

It is accordingly recommended that authority be given for additional water 
loans, to be issued from time to time as may be required for the above purposes, 
to a total amount not exceeding $2,765,000, to be apportioned to the different 
works as follows : — 



Reinforcement of low-service pipe line, 
Northern extra high-service reservoir, . 
Northern high-service pumping machinery, . 
Southern high-service pumping machinery, . 
Reinforcement of northern high-service pipe lines, 
Clinton sewerage, ...... 



$1,800,000 
175,000 
250,000 
200,000 
280,000 
60,000 



Total, 



$2,765,000 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The rapid growth in the population of the city of Quincy has made it neces- 
sary that additional plant and other changes shall be introduced at the Quincy 
pumping station. At the present time this station has a 3,000,000 gallon Dean 
pump, a 5,000,000 gallon pump of similar type and a 10,000,000 gallon centrifu- 
gal pump. During the greater part of the year it is necessary to run the two 
smaller pumps together. At no time can the smallest pump take care of the 
daily flow. It is deemed advisable to install a larger pump in place of the 
3,000,000 gallon pump. For this purpose it is recommended that an appro- 
priation of $10,000 be authorized. 

The screening apparatus at; this station is very crude in design and is entirely 
inadequate for present needs. It is recommended that an appropriation of 
$3,000 be authorized for new screening machinery. The water for condensa- 
tion purposes is at present taken from ground wells. These are inadequate and 
provision should be made for the construction of a reservoir which would be 
filled at high tide and contain a sufficient supply to last through the succeeding 
twelve hours. For this purpose it is recommended that an appropriation of 
$2,000 be authorized. 

It is recommended that authority be given for additional Metropolitan 
Sewerage Loan bonds to an amount not exceeding $15,000, to be expended in 
making the changes and improvements at the Quincy station as outlined above. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of Water Works and 
the Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, with various tables and 
statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 



JAMES A. BAILEY, 

Metropolitan District Commissioner. 



Boston, February 27, 1920. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



EEPOET OF DIEECTOE AND CHIEF ENGINEER OF 

WATER DIVISION. 



James A. Bailey, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
construction and maintenance operations on the Metropolitan Water 
Works for the calendar year 1919. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Mr. Charles E. Haberstroh was retired February 12 after a long 
and creditable service in connection with the Sudbury Works, having 
previously served with the city of Boston from 1875 to 1898, when 
the works were taken by the Commonwealth. 

Mr. Frank S. Hart, who has been connected with the Sudbury 
Works since 1891, was appointed Superintendent upon the retirement 
of Mr. Haberstroh on February 12 and since then the organization 
has been as follows : — 



John L. Howard, 
EUiot R. B. Allardice, 
Frank S. Hart, 
Samuel E. Killam, . . 

Arthur E. O'Neil, . 

Alfred 0. Doane, 

William W. Locke, . 

Clifford Foss, . 

Benjamin F. Han cox, 
James W. Killam, . 

William E. Whittaker, 
Charles E. Livermore, 



Assistant to Ghief Engineer. 

Superintendent of Wachusett Department. 

Superintendent of Sudbury Department. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pipe Lines and 
Reservoirs. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pumping Sta- 
tions. 

Division Engineer, in charge of Mechanical En- 
gineering and Inspection Work. 

Sanitary Inspector, in charge of Sanitary In- 
spection of Watersheds. 

Assistant Engineer, in charge of Distribution 
Civil Engineering. 

Head Draftsman, in charge of Drafting Force. 

Assistant Engineer, in charge of Coal and Oil 
Laboratory and compilation of Pumping Sta- 
tistics. 

Office Assistant, in charge of General Office and 
compilation of Water Supply Statistics. 

Biologist, in charge of Microscopical and Bacte- 
riological Examinations of the Water Supply. 



46 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Including these principal assistants the number of supervising, 
engineering and clerical employees was 42 at the beginning of the 
year and 44 at the end of the year. 

In addition to the office forces the labor forces engaged in main- 
taining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, hydro- 
electric stations and pumping stations and doing minor construction 
work have been as follows : — 



Department. 


Beginning 
of Year. 


End of 
Year. 


Maximum. 


Average. 


Distribution, pipe lines and reservoirs, . 
Distribution, pumping service 


41 
62 
82 
70 


50 
68 
93 

74 


82 

75 

102 

75 


61 
66 
91 
71 




255 


285 


334 


289 



CONSTRUCTION. 
Meters and Connections. 

The work of relocating Venturi meters and of making additional 
connections under the provisions of chapter 172 of the General Acts 
of 1916 on the pipe lines acquired from the city of Boston in 1913, 
which was suspended during 1918 because of the shortage of labor, 
was resumed May 19 on the low-service mains in Washington Street, 
Brookline. 

The work of setting the meter in the 30-inch main was completed 
June 5. Work was then begun on the 36-inch and 40-inch mains, 
but on account of heavy street traffic and numerous underground 
structures the work was difficult and the progress slow, and at the 
end of the year the work is not entirely finished, as the meter regis- 
ters have not been installed and only temporary street repairs have 
been made. 

In connection with this work the 30-inch main was out of service 
from May 26 to June 5, the 40-inch main from August 2 to October 3 
and the 36-inch main from October 3 to December 9. The work 
included the setting of one 30-inch and one 36-inch Venturi meter, 
one 24-inch and two 36-inch gate valves and one 30-inch and one 
36-inch check valve, and the laying of 52.3 feet of 30-inch, 207.7 
feet of 36-inch and 10 feet of 40-inch water pipe, including curves, 
branches, manhole pipes and other special castings. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 47 

Expenditures for this year's work amount to $13,018.34 and the 
total expenditures for meters and connections under chapter 172 
of the General Acts of 1916 to December 31, 1919, are $35,447.95. 

Additional 36-inch Low-service Pipe Line for East Boston. 

The pipes and special castings required for constructing the addi- 
tional 36-inch low-service pipe line for East Boston, which was 
authorized by chapter 322 of the General Acts of 1917 and chapter 
166 of the General Acts of 1919, were purchased from the Warren 
Foundry & Machine Company at a price of $42.75 per ton for the 
pipes and $100 per ton for the specials on the cars at the foundry, 
and freight charges of $4.10 per ton were paid for transportation. 

The contract for laying the pipes was made with Coleman Brothers 
of Chelsea August 14. The pipe line is 1,689 feet in length and ex- 
tends from the 42-inch pipe line in Broadway near Second Street to 
the 36-inch pipe line in Essex Street at Shawmut Street in Chelsea. 
Contract work was begun August 25 and completed November 28. 
The new pipe line was connected with the distribution system by 
the regular water works employees and put into service December 18. 
The expenditures for this pipe line amount to $29,536.91. 

Northern Extra High-service 16-inch Pipe Line for Lexington. 

The pipes and special castings for the northern extra high-service 
16-inch pipe line for Lexington, which was authorized by chapter 172 
of the General Acts of 1916 and chapter 167 of the General Acts of 
1919, were purchased from the Warren Foundry & Machine Com- 
pany at a price of $42.75 per ton for the pipes and $100 per ton for 
the specials on the cars at the foundry, and freight charges of $4.10 
per ton were paid for transportation. 

The contract for laying the pipes was made with James B arietta 
of Boston August 14. The pipe line is 5,944 feet in length and 
extends from the standpipe on Park Avenue in Arlington to the Lex- 
ington boundary line at Massachusetts Avenue. Near both ends of 
the line the pipe trench was located partly in rock, of which 880 
cubic yards were excavated. Contract work was begun September 4 
and completed December 16, when 5,740 feet of pipe had been laid 
by the contractor. The trench for the remaining 204 feet of pipe 
line near the standpipe had been excavated by the contractor, but 
on account of delay in receiving the pipes from the foundry they will 



48 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

be laid by the regular water works employees when the new line is 
connected to the distribution system early in 1920. The expenditures 
for this pipe line amount to $35,186.19. 

Southern Extea High-service 12-inch Pipe Line for Hyde 

Park and Milton. 

The construction of the southern extra high-service 12-inch pipe 
lines in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, and across the Neponset River 
at West Street, for Hyde Park and Milton were authorized by chap- 
ter 172 of the General Acts of 1916 and chapter 165 of the General 
Acts of 1919. The flexible jointed pipes for the duplicate pipe line 
which is to be laid under the Neponset River parallel with the 
existing line were received late in 1918, but on account of shortage 
of labor and unfavorable weather they have not y£t been laid. 
The pipes and special castings for the pipe line in Poplar Street 
were purchased of the Warren Foundry & Machine Company at a 
price of $42.75 per ton for the pipes and $100 per ton for the specials 
on cars at the foundry, and freight charges of $4.10 per ton were 
paid for transportation. 

The contract for laying the pipe in Poplar Street was made with 
Vincenzo Grande of Boston August 13. The pipe line is 2,107 feet 
in length and is parallel with a 12-inch pipe line owned by the city 
of Boston which has been used jointly with the Commonwealth since 
1902. The contractor began work October 2 and on November 22 had 
completed everything except the final resurfacing of the street, which 
it was necessary to defer until spring on account of unfavorable 
weather. The new pipe line will be connected with the distribution 
system by the regular water works employees early in 1920. 

The expenditures amount to $2,983.33 for the river crossing and 
to $8,853.32 for the Poplar Street line. 

MAINTENANCE. 
Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds. 
The annual precipitation on the watersheds was above the average 
during 1919, being 49.05 inches on the Wachusett watershed, 45.64 
inches on the Sudbury and 46.07 inches on the Cochituate watershed. 
The monthly precipitation was noticeably above normal in May, 
September and November and noticeably below normal in June, 
October and December. 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



49 



The percentage of rainfall collected was 53.8 on the Wachusett, 
45.5 on the Sudbury and 48.1 on the Cochituate watershed. 

The annual yield of the watersheds was above the average during 
1919, the amount in gallons per day per square mile being 1,257,000 
on the Wachusett, 988,000 on the Sudbury and 1,056,000 on the 
Cochituate. The monthly yield was noticeably above normal in 
May, September and November and noticeably below normal in 
February. 

Between June 15 and December 15 the city of Worcester dis- 
charged 343,200,000 gallons of water into the Wachusett Reservoir 
watershed from the 9.35 square miles formerly tributary to the 
reservoir and which the city diverted for its water supply in 1911. 
In accordance with the agreement of November 2, 1914, the city 
will be paid at the rate of $2 per million gallons for this water by 
the Commonwealth. The city also discharged 1,864,800,000 gallons 
of water from the diverted area into the Wachusett Reservoir water- 
shed at other times during the year for which no compensation will 
be paid as the reservoir filled before June 15. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water 
stored in each reservoir at the beginning and at the end of the year 
are shown by the following table : — 





Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water. 




J ax. 1, 1919. 


Jax. 1, 1920. 


Storage Reservoirs. 


Capacity 
(Gallons). 


Eleva- ; 

tion 1 i Amount 
of stored 

Water j (Gallons). 
Surface, i 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 

Surface. 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons), 


Cochituate watershed: — 
Lake Cochituate, 2 . 

Sudbury watershed: — 
Sudbury Reservoir, 
Framingham Reservoir 

Xo. 1. 
Framingham Reservoir 

Xo. 2. 
Framingham Reservoir 

Xo. 3. 
Ashland Reservoir, 
Hopkinton Reservoir, 
Whitehall Reservoir, 
Farm Pond, 

Wachusett watershed: — 
Wachusett Reservoir, 


144.36 

260.00 
169.32 

177.87 

186.74 

225.21 
305.00 
337.91 
159.25 

395.00 


2,097,100,000 142.91 1,755,400,000 

7,253,500,000 258.24 6,520,600,000 
289,900,000 ? 167.87 223,400,000 

529,900,000' 176.20 490,300,000 

1,180,000,0003 185.09 1,066,200,000 

1,416,400,000 224.50 1,377,300,000 

1,520,900,000 304.18 | 1,469,600,000 

1,256,900,000 336.90 1,061,100,000 

167,500,000 158.12 107,500,000 

64,968,000,000 381.88 48,426,600,000 


143.96 

258.01 
167.85 

176.08 

186.84 

224.42 
304.06 
336.65 
158.40 

392.03 


2,002,100,000 

6,425,900,000 
222,600,000 

485,200,000 

1,207,900,000 

1,372,900.000 

1,462,100,000 

1,013,300.000 

122,200,000 

61,013,500.000 


Totals 


80,680,100,000 


- 


62,498,000,000 


- 


75,327,700,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 



3 To top of flash-boards. 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The diagram on page 51 shows the quantity of water stored in the 
Wachusett Reservoir and the quantity stored in all the storage res- 
ervoirs combined during the year. 

The table and diagram show the total storage which could be 
drained from the reservoirs. Special provisions would be necessary, 
however, to draw about 10,000,000,000 gallons of this storage for 
consumption as it is below the outlet channels which can be con- 
veniently used for regular service. 

Wachusett Reservoir. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir was 13.12 feet below or- 
dinary high-water line at the beginning of the year, the amount in 
storage being 48,426,600,000 gallons. The water rose about 2 feet 
during January and February and with the spring rains and thaws 
which followed the reservoir had filled to high-water line, or elevation 
395, on April 26. The water remained above this elevation until 
June 16. The highest stage reached was elevation 395.93 on May 23, 
and the reservoir then contained 66,226,100,000 gallons of water. 
Between May 10 and June 1, 3,170,000,000 gallons of water were 
wasted from the reservoir at the overflow as the New England Power 
Company was unable to take additional power at that time without 
wasting water at its plants. The maximum rate of waste at the over- 
flow was 692,000,000 gallons per day on May 23. From June 1 to 
September 1 the water in the reservoir was drawn down at the rate 
of about 1.75 feet per month; it then rose nearly one foot during 
the early part of September and then receded at the rate of about 
one foot per month until November 1 when it was 5.41 feet below 
high-water line. After November 1 the water rose continuously and 
at times rapidly, due to heavy rains, until December 3 when ele- 
vation 392.52 was reached. On account of the high stage of the 
water for that time of the year and the abundant yield it was deemed 
advisable to waste water from the reservoir in order to reserve 
storage capacity for use in regulating the freshet flows next spring 
and to conserve the water power which could be disposed of then 
but probably could not be utilized next spring when the New Eng- 
land Power Company would be wasting water at its plants. Between 
December 3 and December 16 the precipitation amounted to nearly 2 
inches and the water in the reservoir rose to elevation 393.10 not- 
withstanding the increased draft which had been maintained since 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



51 



QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN THE WACHUSETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 

DURING 1919 

JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP OCT. NOV. DEC. 



82.000 



80.000 



78.000 



76.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70.000 



68.000 



66.000 

V) 

C 
-2 64.000 

CO 

CD 

c 62.000 
o 



^ 60.000 
58.000 
56.000 
54.000 
52.000 
50.000 
48.000 



1 !•. 1 1 >A 

COMB/NED CAPACITY OF (ALL 


\ST0RA6E RESERVOIRS AT HI6H WATER ^ 














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On 














































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CAPA 


CITY 


OF 


YACH 


WSET 


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FS£7?t 


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GH Vt 


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VI— 
















































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82.000 



80.000 



78.000 



76.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70.000 



68.000 



66,000 

</) 

c 

64.000 2. 

62.000 c 
o 



60.000 



58.000 



56.000 



54.000 



52.000 



50.000 



48.000 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

December 3, and on account of the continued large yield of the 
watershed water was wasted at an increased rate from the reservoir 
until the end of the year when the water in the reservoir stood at 
elevation 392.03, which is higher than at the close of any previous 
year, and the amount in storage was 61,013,500,000 gallons. 

From December 3 to the end of the year 2,177,300,000 gallons of 
water in excess of the amount required for consumption were drawn 
from the reservoir and wasted, but by utilizing the Sudbury power 
station and the head gates installed at the entrance to the Wachusett 
Aqueduct in 1918 all of the water was used for generating electric 
energy, which was sold at the regular contract prices for the sum of 
$3,114.18, while the quality of the water delivered for consumption 
has been materially improved as a result of the operation. The 
amount of the waste water which was utilized for the generation of 
electric energy at the Wachusett power station only and was dis- 
charged into the Nashua River is 1,215,900,000 gallons. The maxi- 
mum rate of waste into the river was 128,000,000 gallons per day. 

In addition to the waste from the reservoir at the overflow and 
through the power station during the year 587,400,000 gallons of 
w T ater have been discharged from the reservoir in accordance with 
the provisions of chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895. This is 499,800,000 
gallons less for this purpose than during 1918. The reduction is due 
to improvements made at the Lancaster Mills in September, 1918, 
as a result of suggestions made to the mill officials at that time. 

The southerly • shore of the reservoir at the South Dike and 
Hastings Cove and the northerly shore at Kendall Cove were faced 
with heavy riprap to prevent further erosion by wave action and 
protect the highway embankment at the dike and the white pine 
plantings at the coves. The material used for this work was obtained 
from old stone walls and was placed along the shore line for a distance 
of 1,185 feet. The riprap varied from 8 to 22 feet in width, covered 
an area of 1,656 square yards and cost about 78 cents per square 
yard. 

At several places on the southerly shore of the reservoir between 
Hastings Cove and Pine Hill, where the waves had undermined the 
slopes, the trees and bushes were cut and the roots and stumps 
grubbed for a distance of 35 to 50 feet back from the top of the 
slope and for a length of 4,090 feet. This w T ork covered an area 
of 3f acres and cost $173 per acre. In connection with this work 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 53 

it was not deemed necessary to strip off the soil, as had been done 
in former years, which would have caused an additional expense of 
about $500 per acre. 

Material which drifted into the reservoir and was deposited along 
the shores at high water was removed at a cost of 8235.17. Brush 
and weeds were mowed and burned along the sides of the highways 
adjoining reservoir lands, along the brooks which flow directly into 
the reservoir and along the dikes. This work extended over a dis- 
tance of 31 miles and cost $2,726.39. 

"Wire fences have been erected along property lines and highways 
for a distance of 4,364 feet to keep cattle out of the water and from 
damaging the water works land. Standing grass was sold at auction 
on 367 acres of water works land for S3, 255. 50. 

The Wachusett Dam and adjacent structures and grounds have 
been given the usual care and for the most part are in good condi- 
tion, but the granolithic walk on the dam, the planking in the 
bridge at the waste-weir and the roof of the gate chamber and of the 
power house need to be repaired. 

The houses on the reservoir lands and the barns and other build- 
ings located at these premises and at the Clinton and Oakdale 
storage yards have been kept in good condition. The interior of the 
house at the Kendall place in Boylston was renovated at a cost of 
S354.29. The work included papering and painting and repairing 
floors and heater. The interior of the house at the Howe place in 
Sterling Junction was thoroughly renovated; the barn was remod- 
elled and shingled, the hen house relocated and a new cesspool was 
constructed. The cost of this work was $457.70. The sanitary 
conditions at this place have been very much improved. At the 
March place in Oakdale the water supply has been improved by 
installing an electric pump and storage tank; a bath room has been 
provided and arrangements have been made for heating the garage. 
The expenditures for this work amount to $846.93. At the Cook 
place in West Boylston some of the rooms were renovated, a corner 
of the barn has been made into a workshop of sufficient capacity for 
a large auto truck and, including the cost of a chimney, the work 
cost $392.51. At the Clinton storage yard the driveway was under- 
drained r graded and surfaced at a cost of $476.08, and the floor of 
the carpenter shop was repaired at a cost of S89.17. 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Sudbury Reservoir. 

The water in the Sudbury Reservoir was 0.76 of a foot below the 
crest of the overflow at the beginning of the year and was allowed 
to recede until it was 2.34 feet below the crest on February 26 in 
order to conserve power following an accident to the hydroelectric 
machinery at the Wachusett power station on February 17. The 
flash-boards were put on the overflow April 18 and the water was 
allowed to rise until it was 1.25 feet above the crest on June 5. 
Water overflowed from the Sudbury Reservoir into Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3 on 16 days. The overflow amounted to about 
300,000,000 gallons. At other times all of the water flowing from 
the reservoir was used to generate electricity. With the exception 
of the water obtained from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 watershed 
and 713,900,000 gallons drawn from Lake Cochituate all of the water 
for consumption was drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir, which was 
replenished with water from the Wachusett Reservoir as required. 
The flash-boards were removed from the overflow November 21 and 
at the end of the year the water was 0.99 of a foot below the crest of 
the overflow. 

The lands and structures at the reservoir have received the usual 
care. About 10 tons of hay were cut and stored in the water works 
barns. The shores of the reservoir were cleaned and the debris 
burned. The roads and walks were kept in repair and shrubs and 
trees were pruned. 

The house, barn, storehouse, flash-boards and standards at the 
dam and the life preservers and holders were painted. New oak 
floors 3 inches thick were put in three stalls at the barn and a new 
garage was made of a portion of the storehouse. At the Cratty 
house in Fayville board ceiling was put in one room and three rooms 
were painted and papered. 

A channel was cut in the ice back of the overflow at the dam 
during the winter as usual, to remove the ice pressure. 

Sprouts and brush were cut and burned in the lanes and along the 
property lines for a distance of 3| miles. At some places where small 
pines had been set out the lanes were increased from 5 feet to 40 feet 
in width for fire guards and at other places the brush between clear- 
ings and property lines was cut out to a width of 10 feet. This 
work cost $216.03. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 



Framingham Reservoir No. 3. 

All of the water supplied through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the 
Metropolitan Water District and to the town of Framingham was 
drawn from Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which was replenished 
with water from the Sudbury Reservoir as required. The flow in the 
Sudbury Aqueduct is usually continuous day and night, but there is 
usually no flow from the Sudbury Reservoir into Framingham Res- 
ervoir No. 3 on Sundays or holidays and during about 8 hours on 
other days as the Sudbury power station is not then in operation. 
As a result there is considerable variation in the level of the water 
in Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which is also subject to further 
variation at times from the natural yield of its tributary drainage 
area. When the water in the reservoir is low the full capacity of the 
Sudbury Aqueduct cannot be utilized on account of the restricted 
capacity of the outlet pipes. The flash-boards were kept on the 
overflow all the year and the elevation of the water in the reservoir 
varied from 182.53 to 186.84. About 1,046,000,000 gallons of water 
were wasted from the reservoir during the year. 

The gate-house, embankments, shrubs and grounds at the dam 
were given the usual care and the boat was painted. Sprouts and 
brush were cut along the east shore of the reservoir from the dam 
to Estabrook's land, along the south and west shore from Worcester 
Street to Buck's land, and in the lanes along the property lines for 
a distance of 2\ miles and a width of 5 feet. 

Wire was strung on fence posts previously set along the northerly 
boundary of the water works land at the upper end of the reservoir 
from the Stensson land to Boston Road, a distance of 3,070 feet. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and White- 
hall Reservoirs. 

No water was drawn from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, 
Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs for water supply during 
the year, but flash-boards were maintained from early in May to late 
in November on all of the dams except Whitehall Dam, which is not 
provided with an overflow, and all of the reservoirs have been kept 
substantially full of water during the year, although the water was 
drawn down one or two feet at times in anticipation of heavy yields 
so that the large flows could be regulated and properly controlled. 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

A discharge of not less than 1,500,000 gallons of water per day 
was maintained throughout the year from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 1 into the Sudbury River as required by chapter 177 of the 
Acts of 1872. The dams, gate-houses, structures and grounds at 
these reservoirs were cared for in the usual manner. 

A bathroom was fitted up in the Bullard house at Framingham 
Reservoir No. 1 at a cost of $405.74. Sheds, boat houses, boats and 
flash-boards were painted at Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 
and sprouts and brush were cut along the shores and in the lanes 
along property lines at these reservoirs. 

At Ashland Reservoir the house and barn were painted, the drive- 
way was repaired, a new boat was purchased for use in collecting 
samples of water for analysis, sprouts and brush were cut along the 
sides of the outlet channel and for a distance of 4.4 miles and a width 
of 5 feet in the lanes along property lines. 

At Hopkinton Reservoir the northerly half of the roof of the house 
was shingled and the buildings were painted. Thirteen property 
line bounds were set on the north shore at the David Allison land. 
Sprouts and brush were cut along the outlet channel and for a dis- 
tance of 6.5 miles and width of 5 feet in lanes along property lines. 

At Whitehall Reservoir the left side wall of the outlet channel at 
the dam was rebuilt for a length of 32 feet and an average height of 
9 feet. About 60 feet in length of retaining walls 3 feet in height 
were rebuilt along the sides of the outlet channel below the dam. 
Sprouts and brush were cut for a distance of 5.7 miles and a width 
of 5 feet in lanes along property lines. One cottage was built this 
year by an adjoining property owner and there are now 66 cottages 
located near the water works lands at this reservoir. There were 5 
motor boats, 85 row boats and 26 canoes in use on the reservoir this 
year, a total of 116 or 10 less than in 1918. 

Rutter's Brook in Cedar Swamp, Westborough, was improved for a 
distance of about one mile from a point near East Main Street to its 
junction with Jackstraw Brook south of the Boston & Albany Railroad 
at a cost of $679. The brush, sprouts, weeds and other growths were cut 
for a width of 10 feet on both sides of the brook and obstructing roots, 
hassocks, mud and driftwood were removed from the channel. The 
railroad culvert was partially cleaned out by the railroad employees. 

Fence was built for a distance of 575 feet at the H. A. Gilmore 
land and for a length of 300 feet at the Ellen O'Brien land. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 

Farm Pond. 
No water has been let into or wasted from Farm Pond during the 
year. Under rights reserved by legislation the town of Framingham 
pumped 175,500,000 gallons of water from the filter-gallery on the 
easterly shore of the pond, and the Boston & Albany Railroad took 
approximately 62,700,000 gallons and the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad took approximately 42,300,000 gallons of water 
from the pond for use during the year. 

Lake Cochituate. 

Water was drawn from Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate 
Aqueduct for water supply from January 28 to April 3. The re- 
mainder of the yield of the watershed was wasted at the dam at 
the outlet and some water was wasted during every month except 
February. 

The iron and wood work and the tin roof at the effluent gate-house 
and the bridge and ironwork at the outlet dam were painted. 

Grass, brush and weeds were mowed for a width of 10 feet on 
both sides of the open channel on the surface water drain from 
Cochituate Village and sediment was removed from the channel and 
catch basins and from the sand catcher at Bannister's Brook. 

Brush and sprouts were cut for a distance of 6 miles and a width 
of 5 feet in the lanes along the property lines, and around the west 
shore of the lake from the foreman's house to the dam, along both 
sides of Snake Brook and along the shores at the southerly end of 
the lake. 

On lands near the lake adjoining the water works property there 
are now 144 cottages, 18 garages and 2 stables, an increase of 11 
cottages and 3 garages since 1918. The Natick Club house at the 
southerly end of the lake was burned during the year. 

Aqueducts. 
Wachusett Aqueduct. 
Water was discharged through the Wachusett Aqueduct from the 
Wachusett Reservoir on 292 days. The total time that the aque- 
duct was in use is equivalent to 132 days, 2 hours, 55 minutes. The 
total quantity of water discharged is 33,702,700,000 gallons, equiva- 
lent to an average of 92,336,000 gallons per day for the entire year. 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

All of the water was used for generating electric energy at the power 
station before being discharged into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 64,398,009 gallons of 
water from the aqueduct at the terminal chamber during the year. 
This is equivalent to a consumption of 176,400 gallons per day. 

The masonry aqueduct, open channel and appurtenances are in 
good condition with the exception of the Assabet Bridge which re- 
quires waterproofing to stop the leakage which has developed during 
recent years, and a new granolithic walk on the top. 

A wooden shed 19 feet by 23 feet in dimension, for the storage of 
vehicles, was built near the foreman's tool-house at the lower end of 
the masonry aqueduct. The materials for this building were secured 
from trees cut on the water works property and it was built entirely 
by water works employees, at a cost of $220.43. 

A Wheelock wire fence was erected on property lines for a length 
of 4.613 miles in Berlin, Northborough and Southborough to replace 
the original board rail fence erected in 1897. This work cost 19.6 
cents per foot exclusive of the cost of the posts which were cut on 
the water works land. During the past nine years all of the original 
board rail fence has been replaced with Wheelock wire fence and 
some additional fence has been constructed. 

The water works lands along the 7 miles of masonry aqueduct and 
the 3 miles of open channel are now enclosed either with Wheelock 
wire fence or substantial stone walls, except for a distance of about 
7,000 feet where the water works lands may have to be enclosed at 
some future time, but this depends upon the use made of the ad- 
joining lands. Two miles of water works land over the tunnel por- 
tion of the aqueduct in Clinton and Berlin have not been enclosed. 

Brush, grass and weeds were mowed and disposed of for a distance 

of 10 miles along the aqueduct at a cost of about $180 per mile. 

This is about double the cost of this work for the past few years, 

due, largely, to mowing large areas this year which had been left 

during the past two years when labor was scarce and to some extent 

to increased wages. 

Sudbury ■ Aqueduct. 

During the year the Sudbury Aqueduct was in continuous service 
on 365 days with the exception of interruptions of 2 hours on 
May 23, 2| hours on May 26, 7 hours on May 29 and 3f hours on 
August 16, when all the flow into the aqueduct was shut off for 
various purposes in connection with the operation of the works. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 

The usual current meter measurements to standardize the calcula- 
tions of flows in the aqueduct have been taken once a month to 
obtain a coefficient to apply to the daily record of flows as deter- 
mined by the continuous diagram of elevations in the aqueduct at 
the Farm Pond gate-house. The variation in this coefficient during 
the year has been from 86.07 per cent in the summer months to 
93.96 per cent at the last of the year, the arithmetical average 
being 89.30 per cent. 

The total quantity discharged into the aqueduct from Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3 was 24,103,500,000 gallons, and of this 171,300,000 
gallons were taken by the Framingham Water Works through its 
14-inch sheet iron pipe which is submerged under Farm Pond, leaving 
the remainder of 23,932,200,000 gallons as the supply delivered to 
the Metropolitan Water District, or an average of 65,568,000 gallons 
per day, which is 9,065,000 gallons less than in 1918. 

A temporary wooden check valve was placed on the connection 
with the aqueduct in the gate chamber near the Farm Pond inlet 
chamber, where the 14-inch sheet iron pipe line of the town of 
Framingham crosses the pond from the Sudbury Aqueduct to its 
pumping station, so as to prevent the water in the pond from enter- 
ing the Sudbury Aqueduct from leaks in the defective pipe when no 
water is being pumped through it from the Sudbury Aqueduct. 

The coverings over the submerged culverts in Farm Pond under 
the aqueduct were renewed in places and fastened down and the 
roof of the aqueduct gate-house at the easterly shore of the pond was 
repaired. 

At the office building in Framingham, which is located on the 
aqueduct land, the roof was repaired, some of the plumbing was 
renewed and the blue printing tank was relined with zinc, and to 
protect it from corrosion was given two coats of paint and one coat 
of white enamel. 

The culverts along the aqueduct were kept free from snow and 
ice during the winter months. The brush, grass and weeds along the 
aqueduct were mowed and disposed of. 

The gaging chamber at Station 59 and the corrugated iron roof 
of the storehouse at the Rosemary siphon were painted. The iron- 
work at the waste-weirs and siphon chambers, the fence at Echo 
Bridge and the manhole covers were painted with black asphalt 
paint. Some pointing was done at the Rosemary siphon chambers 
and new steps were built and put in place on the embankments at 



CO METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

this place. The new stop-planks that were made last year were 
put in the overflows at Course Brook, Bacon's, Fuller's and Clark's 
waste-weirs. 

Weston Aqueduct. 

On 303 days water was delivered to the Weston Reservoir from 
the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct. The total time 
of service was equivalent to 183 days, 22 hours and 44 minutes. The 
total quantity of water delivered was 17,340,700,000 gallons, or an 
average of 47,509,000 gallons per day, which is 3,003,000 gallons per 
day less than for the year 1918. 

The usual time of running the Sudbury power station is from 6.45 
a.m. to 10.45 p.m. except on Sundays and holidays, and, making 
allowance for preparation of starting and stopping the water wheels, 
the running of the water in the aqueduct is from 7 a.m. to 10.30 p.m., 
an interval of 15| hours. On special occasions the water is run con- 
tinuously for 24 hours. 

Brush, weeds and grass have been mowed and disposed of. The 
brush and sprouts were cut and cleared up for a distance of about 
2,900 feet at the White place and about 3,500 feet south of gaging 
chamber No. 2, and for a width of 5 feet in the lanes along property 
lines. 

Wire fences have been repaired at several places aggregating nearly 
a mile in length and over 500 new posts have been set. The plank 
fence at Potter Street was also repaired; the wood and iron work 
at the head-house at the Sudbury Dam was painted; and the clean- 
ing screens were painted several times. The house and barn at the 
White place have been painted, also the manhole covers and the 
ironwork and woodwork inside and outside of the gaging and siphon 
chambers. The steps on the embankments have been rebuilt or 
repaired where necessary, the culverts along the aqueduct have been 
kept free of ice and snow and the walks and roads have been kept 

in good order. 

Cochituate Aqueduct. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use on 4 days in January, all of 
February and March and 2 days in April, or 65 days in all. The 
total amount of water drawn through the aqueduct during this time 
was 713,900,000 gallons. 

The interior ironwork at the waste-weirs, the iron manhole covers 
and the metal roof at the west pipe chamber at the Charles River 
were painted. The wire fence on property lines at the Harry Felch 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 61 

land was repaired for a distance of 800 feet. Brush, grass and weeds 
along the aqueduct were mowed and disposed of, and the culverts 
were kept clear of snow and ice during the winter. 

Protection of the Water Supply. 
Sanitary Inspection. 

During the winter ice cutting operations were inspected at the 
various reservoirs and ponds where ice cutting is permitted and 
during the summer many of the regular water works employees, 
who were appointed special police, kept a general oversight of the 
water works lands and waters and four temporary watchmen were 
employed to prevent bathing and unauthorized boating and fishing 
in the reservoirs. 

The sanitary inspector and one assistant made the usual exam- 
inations of conditions on the Wachusett, Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds and a summary of these inspections is given in the. ac- 
companying tables. 

The number of premises on the Wachusett watershed increased 
from 1,740 to 1,757 during the year by the construction of 7 new 
houses in West Boylston, 10 in Holden, 1 in Princeton and 3 summer 
cottages in Sterling, and the removal of 2 dwellings, an ice house 
and a chair repository. 

The mills at Dawsonville, Eagleville, Jefferson and Quinapoxet 
were operated at full capacity. 

The Mount Pleasant House in Jefferson has been open since May 
and the Prospect House in Princeton was open during the summer. 

Construction work has been continued by the city of Worcester 
at its Pine Hill Dam and the sanitary conditions about this work 
have been carefully inspected. 

The number of premises on the Sudbury watershed increased 
from 4,889 to 4,895 during the year by the construction of 8 new 
buildings and the elimination of 2 old buildings. Three of the new 
premises are connected with the public sewer and the drainage is 
carried off the watershed. 

The number of premises on the Cochituate watershed increased 
from 3,216 to 3,250 during the year by the construction of 37 new 
buildings and the elimination of 3 old buildings. Seventeen of the 
new premises are connected with the public sewer and the drainage 
is carried off the watershed. 



62 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Filtration and Chlorination. 

On the Wachusett watershed the surface water from 525 acres in 
the village of Sterling was filtered at the Sterling filter-beds. The 
sewage from the Worcester County Training School, occupied by 
about 78 persons, was purified at the filter-beds on Beaman Street 
in West Boylston. The Gates Terrace filter-beds at Sterling Junction 
were operated continuously from April 18 to the end of the year, as 
one cottage is being occupied during the winter. The cost of main- 
taining all of these filter-beds was $599.96. 

On the Sudbury watershed the surface water from an area of 2 
square miles in Marlborough was filtered at the Marlborough Brook 
filter-beds before it entered the Sudbury Reservoir. At the com- 
bination storage reservoir and filter-bed on Farm Road diluted 
sewage from the Marlborough sewer was filtered on one day in 
February, 16 days in March and 22 days in April, and the ground 
water from the sewer underdrain was filtered during every month. 
The periodical cleaning of the settling basins at Marlborough Brook, 
which was due this year, was deferred because of the scarcity and 
high price of labor; otherwise the filters and appurtenances were 
given the usual care and attention, the surface of the beds being 
cleaned during the summer and again in the fall. 

The necessary repairs and cleaning at the Southborough swimming 
pool having been attended to by the town the pool was used freely 
during the summer. The water was changed twice a week while the 
pool was in use and the drainage was purified at the filter-bed located 
below the pool, which has been cleaned several times and kept in 
good order. 

The surface water from Cherry Street Brook at Fayville was 
treated with calcium hypochlorite whenever there was any proba- 
bility of pollution from the adjacent premises. 

The cost of filtration and chlorination on the Sudbury watershed 
was $2,162.04. 

On the Cochituate watershed all of the surface water from the 
thickly settled area of about one square mile tributary to Pegan 
Brook in Natick was pumped and filtered at the Pegan filtration 
works, but the area tributary to the intercepting ditch furnished 
more water than could be cared for on 1 day in January, 1 day in 
February, 7 days in March and 1 day in November, the aggregate 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

overflow amounting to 7,700,000 gallons, which was treated with 
calcium hypochlorite. The pumping station was operated on 272 
days during the year and 408,410,000 gallons of surface water, equiv- 
alent to an average of 1,119,000 gallons per day for the entire year 
were pumped to the filter beds. The cost of operating and main- 
taining the pumping station and filter-beds was $6,429.49, or at the 
rate of $15.74 per million gallons pumped. Early in the year a 
20-inch by 12-inch Venturi meter was installed in the force main 
between the pumping station and the filters for measuring the quan- 
tity of water pumped. The grounds, filter-beds and pumping plant 
were kept in good condition and the intercepting reservoir was 
cleaned and about 760 cubic yards of sediment removed at a cost of 
$229.92. 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks. 

The ditches maintained in the swamps on the watersheds for 
improving the quality of the water were cleaned and weeds and 
brush mowed for a width of 10 to 20 feet on both sides where nec- 
essary at a cost of $2,063.78 for the 27.73 miles connected with the 
Wachusett works and a cost of $1,019.94 for the 8.94 miles con- 
nected with the Sudbury works. 

A Wheelock wire fence 3,220 feet in length, erected in 1912 to 
enclose drainage ditches constructed through a portion of Little 
Crane Swamp in Northborough, was reconstructed with watering 
places and bridges in accordance with the terms under which the 
enclosed area became the property of the Commonwealth in 1918. 
This work cost 15 cents per linear foot. 

The work of improving Gates Brook in the Wachusett watershed 
was not resumed this year on account of scarcity and high price of 
labor. 

The flow of the brook through land acquired from the town of 
Framingham on Pleasant Street, which ran directly into the reser- 
voir, was intercepted by a trench and an outlet was made connecting 
the trench with an old gravel pit in which the flow was stored and 
allowed to seep off or filter without overflowing into the reservoir 
and the old brook channel was filled in for about 100 feet. 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Purchase of Land. 

For the protection of the water supply on the Wachusett water- 
shed 31.29 acres of land, located along the Quinapoxet River and on 
Main Street, West Boylston, and along the Stillwater River and 
Waushacum Brook, Sterling, were acquired during the year; also 
about 50 acres of land in Boylston, which drained either directly into 
the Wachusett Reservoir or Malagasco Brook, was purchased, but 
the surveys and takings have not as yet been completed. Wooden 
frame buildings on two of these parcels and one on the former 
Stone property on Waushacum Street, Sterling, were sold and moved 
to locations outside the watershed. The wooden boat-club house on 
Middle Waushacum Pond in Sterling, owned by the Gates Terrace 
Boat Club, was removed late in the year in accordance with the 
terms of the lease which expired October 1, 1919. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works. 

Pumping Station. 

In connection with the operation of the Clinton sewage disposal 
works, under the provisions of chapter 557 of the Acts of the year 
1898, the pumping station was operated daily with the exception of 
5 days between May 22 and 28 when operation was impossible on 
account of high water in the Nashua River which flooded the 
station. 

The quantity of sewage pumped to the filter-beds averaged 
1,168,000 gallons per day, which is 103,000 gallons per day more 
than in 1918. All of the sewage was pumped with the electrically 
driven 12-inch DeLaval centrifugal pump installed in 1912, except 
295,000 gallons on February 17 and 18 when the electric service was 
interrupted by the accident at the Wachusett power station and 
some pumping was done with the old Blake compound duplex steam 
pump, which is held in reserve, but on account of the failure of 
several of the boiler tubes it was necessary to shut down the steam 
plant. On February 17, 18 and 19, on account of the accident, and 
again between May 22 and 28, on account of high water, sewage 
overflowed into the South Branch of the Nashua River for 182 
hours and 25 minutes. The pumping statistics are as follows: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



67 



Total pumpage (gallons), 
Average pumpage (gallons per day), . 
Electric energy used (kilowatt hours), 
Pumpage per kilowatt hour (gallons), . 

Average lift (feet), 

Efficiency of pumping unit and transmission line (per cent), 
Coal used for burning sludge and heating (pounds), 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, . 

Electric energy at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours, 

Coal for burning sludge and heating, 

Repairs and supplies, 



Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



420,402,000 

1,168,000 

139,123 

3,020 

49.8 

52.5 

65,790 



$1,375 54 
737 35 
230 51 

577 11 

$2,920 51 

$6.95 
.1395 



The slate roof and copper flashing of the pumping station and the 
cast-iron cap, brickwork and lightning rod of the chimney were 
repaired at a cost of $90.60. 

Filters. 

With the exception of from May 16 to 22 and from May 28 to 
June 5, inclusive, the filter-beds and settling basins were operated 
by first passing the sewage through one of five settling basins the 
effluent from which was applied to the 25 one-acre filter-beds in 
regular doses of 59,000 gallons in 30 minutes at intervals of about 
If days. The rate of filtration averaged about 44,000 gallons per 
acre per day. The cost of filtration during 1919 was as follows: — 

Labor, $7,708 84 

Supplies and expenses, 1,371 09 

Total, . $9,079 93 

Cost per million gallons, $21 60 



This high cost of filtration is due in part to higher wages and in- 
creased cost of supplies, but largely to the condition of the filters 
which have been overworked for some time. The character of the 
effluent for the past ^ve years is shown by the following table: — 



68 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



[Parts per 100,000. 





1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 






1.4350 


1.0255 


.8652 


.8792 


.6265 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 






.09347 


.0983 


.1383 


.1439 


.0908 


Reduction, per cent, 






93.5 


90 


84 


83.6 


86 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 






3.7867 


2.7850 


3.4707 


3.2300 


3.0925 


Free ammonia, efrluent, . 






.5924 


1.0316 


1 . 7658 


1.5094 


1.5571 


Reduction, per cent, 






84 


63 


49 


53 


50 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 






.7152 


.3693 


.20165 


.2866 


.1818 


Iron, efiluent, .... 






.30815 


1.052 


2.036 


1.903 


2.5644 


Average quantity of sewage filtered, gallons 
per day. 


941,000 


1,225,000 


1,050,000 


1,037,000 


1,168,000 



Corn and tobacco were grown on two of the gravel beds and one 
of the loam beds as an experiment to see if the capacity of the 
filters could be increased in this manner. The crops did finely on the 
loam bed and very poorly on the gravel beds, but instead of being 
increased the capacity of the filters was somewhat reduced as these 
beds could not be used in regular turn without flooding and killing 
the plants. 

The work of washing the filtering material for a depth of 6 to 10 
inches from the surface of the gravel beds, which was begun in 1918, 
was resumed in June and continued through October. The plant 
was the same as used last year with the addition of another portable 
pumping unit and a 3-inch discharge pipe line for removing the dirty 
water and sludge, and an elevator for handling the washed material. 
After using the elevator for a few weeks the gasoline engine which 
operated it was accidentally broken, and while repairs were being 
made it was found that a man with a one-horse drag scoop could 
keep the washing machine free of washed material and regrade the 
bed at less cost than with the elevator, which, after repairs, was 
sent to the Chestnut Hill pumping stations to be used in handling 
coal. A force of 8 men and 2 horses was employed, and about 2,400 
cubic yards of material from two of the gravel beds, each approxi- 
mately one acre in area, were washed at a cost of $3,700. The cost 
per cubic yard of material washed was $1.50 this year, 25 cents 
less than last year although wages had increased 16 per cent. 

The top 6 to 10 inches of filtering material on beds Nos. 2, 5 and 
14 has now been washed by this method and sewage is being ap- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



69 



plied to these beds in doses of about 58,000 gallons in 30 minutes 
at intervals of about 2 days, which is equivalent to a rate of filtra- 
tion of about 29,000 gallons per acre per day. Under these condi- 
tions the beds are operating in a satisfactory manner and the 
effluent from them again contains dissolved oxygen. 



Forestry. 

Wachusett Lands. 

Parcels of water works land bordering on the Wachusett Reser- 
voir in Boylston and Sterling, which had recently been burned over 
or were grown to chestnut trees affected by the bark disease, having 
a total area of 22 acres, were cleared for planting with pine seed- 
lings. This work cost about $53 per acre, but as cross ties, fence 
posts and cordwood having a value of $996 were obtained the net 
cost is about $8 per acre. 

Thirty-four acres of water works land in Sterling west of the 
North Dike and 4 acres on Beaman Street in West Boylston, which 
had been planted and since burned and cleared for planting again, 
were replanted with 35,700 Scotch pine seedlings 4 years old and 
1,700 white spruce seedlings 7 years old from the Oakdale nursery. 
The cost of preparing the trees in the nursery and field planting 
them was $22.28 per thousand or $24.50 per acre. 

Plantings on parcels of water works land located along the mar- 
gins of the Wachusett Reservoir in Clinton, Sterling and West 
Boylston, aggregating 38 acres, were filled in where the original 
trees had failed with 11,200 white pine seedlings 5 years old from 
the Oakdale nursery at a cost of $18.80 per thousand. 

At the end of the year the Oakdale nursery contained the fol- 
lowing seedlings : — 



White pine 2 years old in seed beds, . 
White pine 3 years old in transplant beds, 
White pine 4 years old in transplant beds, 
White pine 5 years old in transplant beds, 
White pine 6 years old in transplant beds, 
Red pine 3 years old in transplant beds, 
Red pine 7 years old in transplant beds, . 
White spruce 8 years old in transplant beds, 
Maple 3 years old transplanted from field, 



15,500 

42,900 

6,900 

44,000 

700 

400 

100 

8,000 

750 



Total, 



119,250 



70 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

All of the Norway pine, tamarack and sequoia seedlings on hand 
last year were winter-killed. 

The sprouts and undergrowth which were interfering with the 
pines planted during the past few years on about 98 acres of land 
along the open channel portion of the Wachusett Aqueduct and on 
the margins of the reservoir were cut and disposed of at a cost of 
SI 0.57 per acre, but as cord wood valued at $150 was obtained from 
this work the net cost is $9.04 per acre. 

Work on improvement thinning of a portion of Big Crane Swamp 
in Westborough, thickly grown to cedars, which was in progress late 
in 1918 was continued into the early spring of 1919 and was resumed 
again just before the close of the year. About 3 acres were im- 
proved at a cost of $1,949.40, and there were secured from the opera- 
tion 151,000 shingles, 1,420 fence posts and 45 cords of wood having 
an estimated value of about $1,600. The shingles and posts were 
used in connection with water works operations and the cordwood 
was sold. 

The trees and shrubbery at the Wachusett Dam and the trees on 
water works land adjacent to the main highways at the Wachusett 
Reservoir, Waushacum Ponds and the Sterling and Clinton sew- 
erage filter beds, and on several large areas of forest land on the 
margin of the Wachusett Reservoir which were badly infested with 
gypsy moths, were sprayed with 7,500 pounds of arsenate of lead 
during May and June at a cost of $1,564.70. An auto truck with 
power sprayer was used for all of this work. 

In the fall of the year about 13,000 egg clusters of the gypsy 
moth on trees and shrubbery at the Wachusett Dam were painted 
with creosote at a cost of $136.07. 

During June and July many of the white pine plantings on the 
marginal lands around the reservoir and along the open channel 
portion of the Wachusett Aqueduct were inspected for the pine 
tree weevil on two occasions. A total of about 43,000 infected 
shoots were cut and burned at a cost of $775.23. The number of 
trees attacked by the weevil increases each year, and as it is nec- 
essary to confine this work to trees of medium height and under 
the value of the pine stands is being considerably reduced. 

The total cost of protecting the trees and plantings from insects 
and disease during the year was $2,476. 

The usual fire patrol service was maintained during the spring 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

and fall. Four fires, involving considerable damage to the white 
pine plantings and some damage to the hard wood growth, occurred 
during March and April, and three of them were due to gross care- 
lessness on the part of owners of adjacent lands. On March 26 a 
grass fire spread from the property of an adjoining owner in West 
Boylston, near the Sterling town line, and burned over about 90 
acres of water works land, 71 acres of which were grown to gray 
birch, sprout and brush, 15 acres to white pine from 12 to 15 feet 
high, planted in 1904, and 4 acres to white pine from 3 to 5 feet 
high, planted in 1913. About 6,000 of the large trees and 4,500 of 
the smaller ones were destroyed. On April 23, sparks from a loco- 
motive on the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad started 
a fire among the young pines on a lot in Southborough near the 
upper dam of the open channel portion of the Wachusett Aqueduct 
and burned over about 2 acres of land, destroying 1,500 white pine 
trees from 2 to 3 feet in height. The Railroad Company reimbursed 
the Commonwealth for the loss, which amounted to $29.85. On 
April 23 a brush fire spread to one of the finest white pine stands 
on the water works lands, located back of the South Dike in Clin- 
ton. The abutting owner was engaged in clearing and burning- brush 
on a piece of meadow land adjoining the water works property and 
left his work at noon with the fires apparently all out. A very high 
wind was blowing and some live ashes were blown into the dry grass 
and brush which caught fire and about 15 acres of water works land 
planted to white pine in 1908 were burned over, destroying about 
18,000 trees from 10 to 15 feet high. The abutting owner was prose- 
cuted by the deputy State forest fire warden, was found guilty of 
burning brush in the open without a permit and was fined $75. 

The brush, grass and weeds were mowed and burned on 23 miles 
of marginal fire guard which is 40 feet wide and on 40 miles of 
forest roads from 15 to 45 feet wide. This mowing, which had been 
somewhat neglected for several years, cost $54.70 per mile. 

A marginal strip 100 feet in width along the main highways bor- 
dering the water works land around the Wachusett Reservoir was 
cleared of all brush and undergrowth and the trees were trimmed as 
a means of preventing roadside grass fires from spreading to the 
improved and planted water works lands. At the close of the year 
99 acres along 6j miles of highway had been improved in this man- 
ner at a cost of $38.50 per acre and the work was still in progress. 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The marginal grass strip between the traveled roadways and the 
water works lands was burned over in the early spring along about 
14 miles of the highways bordering the reservoir at a cost of $318.21. 

At the close of the year the Wachusett lands may be classified as 
follows : — 



Forest lands acquired and not since improved (acres), 

Forest lands acquired and since improved (acres), 

Land which has been planted with trees and not cleared (acres), 

Land which has been planted with trees and since cleared (acres), 

Land to be planted with trees (acres), 

Open land which will probably not be planted (acres) , 
Marginal strip along shore of the reservoir (acres), 

Total, 



1,410 
330 
238 

1,285 

622 
820 
212 

4,917 



The total expenditures for forestry on the Wachusett lands during 
the year amount to $12,620.71. 

Sudbury and Cochituate Lands. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir nursery 125,000 white pine seedlings 2 
years old and 10,000 4 years old were on hand at the beginning of 
the year, and in May 100,000 white pine seedlings 2 years old were 
received from the State nursery at Amherst. 

Of the 135,000 seedlings on hand at the beginning of the year 
54,300 were set out on the land back of the Bigelow place on Farm 
Road, 42,000 on Pine Hill, 11,400 on the A. J. Newton land, and 
10,000 4 years old and 4,350 2 years old were used to replace pines 
lost by fires and for filling in at other places at the Sudbury Res- 
ervoir. There were also 3,750 pines used to replace dead trees on the 
southerly shore of Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and 2,400 used at 
Lake Cochituate. 

Of the 2,400 pines received from the Sudbury Reservoir and 13,700 
4-year-old pine seedlings from the West Pond Street nursery at 
Lake Cochituate, 1,000 were planted in the sand borrow pit east 
of gaging chamber No. 2 of the Weston Aqueduct, 5,500 at the cut 
easterly of Wellesley Avenue and 1,200 west of the storehouse at 
the Rosemary siphon chamber on the Sudbury Aqueduct, 3,000 
near Morse's Pond on the Cochituate Aqueduct, 3,000 at the pasture 
north of Snake Brook at Lake Cochituate and 2,000 on the shores 
of the lake near the outlet dam. 

About 85 acres of woodland at Pine Hill and back of the Bige- 
low place on Farm Road at the Sudbury Reservoir were cleared in 



■No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

preparation for setting out pine seedlings. Of this area the water 
works employees cleared 35 acres from which 2,500 chestnut fence 
posts were cut and the remaining 50 acres were cleared by parties 
to whom the wood was sold. 

Part of the trees at the Sudbury Reservoir, Framingham Res- 
ervoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, Lake^Cochituate and the Weston Aqueduct 
were sprayed with arsenate of lead in May and June. The power 
sprayer in use on the Sudbury works was disabled at the last of the 
season, and the one used at the distribution reservoirs was transferred 
to finish the work. The sprayers were in use 30| days with an 
average force of 8 men and 9,000 pounds of arsenate of lead were 
used. The total cost of the work was $2,080.69. 

On the Sudbury and Cochituate lands 218,800 gypsy moth egg 
masses were painted with creosote at a cost of $668.50. 

Brown-tail moth caterpillars were destroyed within 50 feet of 
the highways at Lake Cochituate and at the Framingham and 
Sudbury reservoirs as far as the time and means at hand would 
permit. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir 19,000 leaders affected by the pine-tree 
weevil were cut off at a cost of $386.87, and along the Weston Aque- 
duct 1,100 were cut. 

Fires of unknown origin, which occurred at the Sudbury Reservoir 
and along the Cochituate Aqueduct in February, March and July, 
destroyed about 1,100 pines 3 feet to 6 feet high and about 1,300 
smaller trees. 

The total amount expended for forestry on the Sudbury and 
Cochituate lands during the year was $9,165.35. 

Distribution Reservoir Lands. 

Gypsy and brown-tail moths and elm-leaf beetles were destroyed 
on distribution reservoir lands as in former years by spraying the 
foliage with arsenate of lead during the crawling season and by 
painting the gypsy moth egg clusters with creosote and burning the 
brown-tail moth webs during the winter. A 2-horse-power sprayer 
was used for spraying and 3,560 pounds of arsenate of lead in paste 
form were used. 

Oyster scale, found on shrubs at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, was 
destroyed by using scalecide and Arlington oil. 



74 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The leaders on pine trees at the Weston Reservoir, which were 
infested with the pine-tree weevil, were cut off and burned. 
The total expenditure for this work was $2,277.60. 

Hydro-electric Service. 

The total quantity of electric energy delivered during the year 
from the two hydro-electric stations which are operated in connec- 
tion with the Metropolitan Water Works was 12,851,461 kilowatt 
hours. 

The total value of this energy at the contract prices is $73,227.70. 
The total expenses chargeable to both stations are $41,434.69, leav- 
ing a profit for the operation of the stations of $31,793.01, equiva- 
lent to $2,474 per thousand kilowatt hours. 

Although the abundant yield during the year permitted the gen- 
eration of 642,573 kilowatt hours of electric energy from 2,549,600,000 
gallons of water which were not required for consumption but were 
wasted through the turbines to conserve the power, the total energy 
generated in 1919 is about 9 per cent less than in 1918. 

This is accounted for by the unusually large consumption in 1918, 
due to war activities and the extremely cold weather, as compared 
with reduced consumption in 1919, due to mild weather and the 
cessation of war work. 

Wachusett Service. 

The Wachusett power station was operated on 279 days during 
the year, and all energy not used in connection with the operation 
of the Metropolitan Water Works was sold to the New England 
Power Company and the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston under the contract dated January 13, 1917. 

This contract provides for the construction by the Commonwealth 
of a 66,000-volt transmission line between the Wachusett and Sud- 
bury power stations and for the purchase by the companies of all 
of the energy available from the water drawn from the Wachusett 
Reservoir for water supply up to a maximum of 7,000,000 kilowatt 
hours per year. The Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line was 
completed in July, 1918, and was turned over to the companies at 
midnight December 31, 1918. According to the provisions of the 
contract they are to maintain and operate the line for a period of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 75 

ten years from that date. On account of delay in the completion of 
the Edison Electric Illuminating Company's connecting line the 
Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line had not been put into regular 
service at the end of the year, but on August 9 the company had 
completed its outdoor sub-station, which is located on water works 
land on the hillside at the northerly end of the Sudbury Dam, and 
established a connection of small capacity from the transmission line 
through the Sudbury power station to its Hopkinton line. At the 
close of the year the Edison Electric Illuminating Company's trans- 
mission line was connected through to its L Street power station in 
South Boston and some of the preliminary tests necessary for putting 
it into service had been completed. 

In the spring while water was being wasted from the reservoir 
the head gates installed in 1918 at the entrance to the Wachusett 
Aqueduct were tested and their operation was entirely satisfactory. 
It was Jound that by using the head gates as planned water could be 
wasted at the rate of about 300,000,000 gallons per day from the res- 
ervoir through the turbines into the Nashua River and utilized for 
the generation of electric energy. In making the tests 372,300,000 
gallons of water were discharged through the turbines into the 
river. 

On account of the abundant yield in November and the high 
stage of the water in the reservoir at the beginning of December 
water was wasted through the turbines into the river on every day 
that the power station was operated from December 3 to the end of 
the year, the total waste at this time amounting to 1,215,900,000 
gallons. 

The total electric energy generated with all of the water wasted 
through the turbines into the river is 331,221 kilowatt hours, which 
was sold to the electric companies at the contract price for the sum 
of $1,755.47. The total amount of energy sold to the companies 
during the year exceeds the contract maximum by 474,485 kilowatt 
hours. 

About 7.30 a.m. February 17 a serious accident occurred at the 
Wachusett power station. The operator, in attempting to correct 
a fault in the operation of the oil pump on turbine No. 2, discon- 
nected the governor so that the wicket gates, which were nearly 
wide open, closed suddenly and the resulting water ram broke out a 
large section of the top portion of the scroll case. 



76 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The water flowed out of this opening, which had an area of 17^ 
square feet, under a head of 70 feet, and broke in the door leading 
from the superintendent's office to a balcony overlooking the gen- 
erating room and about 12 feet above the floor, and swept through 
the office which, fortunately, was unoccupied at the time, completely 
wrecking everything within eight feet of the floor and destroying all 
of the office records. 

In the generating room windows and doors and wooden partitions 
were broken down by the force of the water, some of which spurted 
up to the top of the room, about 35 feet above the floor. The water 
flooded the floor to a depth of 4 feet and flowed out of the doors 
and windows over the lawn, driveway and walks into the river and 
through a floor grating into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 

At the time of the accident exciter No. 2 and generating units 
Nos. 1, 2 and 4 were in operation. The operator disconnected the 
generators from the line before leaving the building but was unable to 
close the hydraulic valves on the pen stocks. It was therefore neces- 
sary to shut off the water by closing the sluice gates in the dam, and 
as electric power was not available this had to be done by hand, but 
was completed 35 minutes after the accident occurred. 

The rotors of generators Nos. 1 and 4 continued to revolve for a 
time partly submerged in the water, and the insulation of the field 
and armature coils was cut and scraped in places. There was also 
injury of this nature on generator No. 2, but none on generator No. 
3 which was not in operation. 

All of the electrical apparatus was thoroughly soaked in water, and 
the governor on turbine No. 2 was damaged somewhat by fragments 
of metal from the broken scroll case. 

Immediately after the water in the generating room had receded 
repairs were begun by the station employees, and two days later by 
men from the Standardizing and Testing Department of the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, and from time to time 
by repair men especially trained in the required line of work at 
hand. The repairs comprised a complete overhauling, drying out, 
replacing of broken parts and appliances and testing of the entire 
electrical generating apparatus and water wheels and governors. 

On the third night after the break a temporary connection had 
been made with the New England Power Company's line, and al- 
ternating current was available for drying and testing the electrical 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

apparatus and for operating the Clinton sewerage pumping station. 
Unit No. 3, which was not injured except by moisture, was first 
dried out and tested and was put into regular service February 25, 
eight days after the break occurred. Unit No. 1 was next repaired 
and dried out and was put into service March 4, while unit No. 4 
was put into service March 7. With these three units available the 
normal operation of the station was resumed, but the repairs to 
turbine No. 2 were not completed until August 2 as it was necessary 
to obtain and install a new top section of the scroll case on this unit. 

Soon after resuming operations it became evident from several 
failures that the rubber insulation on the main cables leading from 
the generators to the switch board was in poor condition and they 
were replaced with paper insulated cables and new terminals. 

In addition to the repairs to the generating plant the building 
and grounds have been put in good condition, and the office has 
been repaired and equipped with new furniture. The expenditures 
for all of this work amount to $11,260.52. 

Additional electrical apparatus required when operating with water 
wasted into the Nashua River ^and protective devices to insure the 
safety of the operators and equipment have been installed by the 
regular station employees during the year at a cost of $1,837.70. 

During an extremely heavy and extended electrical storm on Sun- 
day, August 24, a transformer in the sub-station of the New Eng- 
land Power Company at the Lancaster Mills, Clinton, failed and 
simultaneously one of the strain insulators in the lightning arrester 
station at the Wachusett Dam broke down causing a short circuit 
which set fire to a window frame, but no serious damage resulted and 
the broken insulator was promptly repaired. 

The Wachusett hydro-electric statistics for the year 1919 are as 
follows : — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 7,672,505 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 58,897 



Available energy (kilowatt hours), 7,613,608 

Water used (gallons), 35,290,900,000 

Average head (feet), 95.9 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . . 2. 27 

Efficiency of station (per cent), 72. 14 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Credits : — 
Energy sold New England Power Company 
and Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 
7,474,485 kilowatt hours at $0.0053, . . . $39,614 77 
Energy furnished Clinton sewerage pumping sta- 
tion, 139,123 kilowatt hours at $0.0053, . . - 737 35 
Rental, transmission line location, . . . 139 00 

$40,491 12 



Charges : — 

Superintendence, $1,089 77 

Labor, operating station, 7,303 85 

Repairs and supplies : — 



Power station, .... $1,238 93 

Transmission line, .... 98 05 



Alterations and additions : — 

Labor, $114 75 

Apparatus and supplies, . . 1,722 95 



1,336 98 



1,837 70 

$11,568 30 

Taxes, 2,825 00 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund, . 9,769 06 



24,162 36 

Profit, $16,328 76 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, . . . $3. 174 

Sudbury Service. 

The Sudbury power station was operated on 303 days during the 
year and on 251 of these days the station was operated two shifts of 
8 hours each, from 6.45 a.m. to 10.45 p.m.; on the remaining 52 
days it was operated three shifts of 8 hours each in order to main- 
tain the water supply and also to utilize waste water available in 
December. It was not necessary to operate the station on any 
Sunday or holiday during the year. 

On account of the abundant supply of water from the Wachusett 
watershed the Sudbury station was operated at maximum capacity 
rather than at maximum efficiency a large part of the time and the 
average efficiency is less than for last year. No water was by-passed 
around the turbines and all the water drawn from Sudbury Reservoir 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

was used to generate electricity excepting about 300,000,000 gallons 
wasted over the overflow of the dam in May and June. 

In December 499,400,000 gallons of water not needed at Weston 
Reservoir were discharged through turbines Nos. 1 and 2 into the 
Weston Aqueduct head house and turned back through the No. 3 
60-inch pipe into the open channel which supplies Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3. The total quantity of water not required for con- 
sumption wasted through Nos. 1 and 2 turbines in this manner or 
through No. 3 turbine so as to conserve the power was 961,400,000 
gallons, from which 115,755 kilowatt hours of electric energy was 
obtained and sold for the sum of $723.47. 

The wheel pits and the portion of the machinery located below 
the power station floor were inspected several times during the year. 
The steady bearings were adjusted and leaks in the masonry walls 
of No. 2 wheel pit were pointed with oakum and lead wool. 

During the year service wafe interrupted by troubles on the Edison 
lines on several occasions, but the operating time lost was inconsid- 
erable excepting on June 4, when operation was suspended for 9| 
hours on account of a burned out insulator on the Edison line at 
Worcester Street. 

The poles on the 4,000 feet of the Hopkinton 13,800-volt trans- 
mission line owned and maintained by the Commonwealth were 
marked with metal danger tags and numbers from 415 to 456 were 
stencilled on painted panels on the poles. Brush and weeds on this 
line were cut and burned twice during the year. 

The Sudbury hydro-electric statistics for the year 1919 are as 
follows : — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 5,249,400 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 11,547 

Available energy (kilowatt hours), 5,237,853 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: — 

Water used (gallons), 22,756,000,000 

Average head (feet), 65.79 

Weston Aqueduct service : — 

Water used (gallons), 17,840,100,000 

Average head (feet), . 39.15 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . . 2.391 

Efficiency of station (per cent), 76.1 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Credits : — 
Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, 

5,237,853 kilowatt hours at $0.00625, $32,736 58 

Charges : — 

Superintendence, $1,346 78 

Labor, operating station, 8,243 38 

Repairs and supplies, 549 31 

Alterations and additions : — 

Labor, $259 69 

Apparatus and supplies, . . 365 63 

625 32 



$10,764 79 



Taxes, 1,094 30 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 

sinking fund, 5,413 24 



$17,272 33 

Profit, $15,464 25 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, ... $3 . 298 

Distribution Pumping Service. 

The total quantity of water pumped at the five distribution pump- 
ing stations during the year was 29,393,480,000 gallons, and 3,800,- 
890,000 gallons, or 11.45 per cent, less than the quantity pumped 
in 1918. Of the total quantity of water supplied to the Metropoli- 
tan Water District in 1919, 66.2 per cent was pumped for the 
northern low, high and extra high services and the southern low 
service, and 0.58 per cent was repumped for the southern extra high 
service. 

The total cost of operating all the pumping stations for the year 
1919 is $198,723.02. Compared with the previous year there is an 
increase of about $15,000 for operating labor, due to increased w r ages 
to meet the high cost of living; an increase of about $13,000 for 
repairs which had been deferred during the war on account of diffi- 
culty in obtaining the necessary labor and materials, and an increase 
of about $2,700 in the cost of supplies, making a total increase for 
these items of about $30,700, but as there was a saving of about 
$18,700 in the cost of fuel the net increase is about $12,000. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

Fuel. 

At the beginning of the year there were 1,534 gross tons of bitu- 
minous coal and 1,486 gross tons of anthracite screenings on hand 
at the pumping stations. 

Between January 1 and May 1 about 2,000 gross tons of bitu- 
minous coal were purchased of E. Russell Norton, under an agreement 
made in 1918, on the basis of the United States Fuel Administration 
price of $3.31 per gross ton at the mines plus 17 cents per gross 
ton for dealer's commission. 

About April 1 two cars of bituminous coal were purchased from 
the Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Company for $2.80 per gross ton at the 
mines, and on April 9 an order was placed with the company for 
nine additional cars at the same price, but subject to the bonus and 
penalty specification of our 1917 contract with the company. Alto- 
gether there were 556 gross tons of this coal, which proved to be of 
very poor quality, the average of ten analyses being 13,661 British 
thermal units per pound of dry coal and 13.38 per cent ash, but 
after making the specified deductions for quality the price paid for 
the coal was only $2.30 per gross ton at the mines. 

Early in May a contract was made with the George E. Warren 
Company of Boston for furnishing 8,000 gross tons of bituminous 
coal for the pumping stations on the basis of $3.09 per gross ton at 
the mines for coal of specified standard quality. This price was 
subject to an increase at the rate of 4 cents per ton for 100 British 
thermal units per pound of dry coal over 14,600 and to a decrease 
at the rate of 6 cents per ton for 100 British thermal units per 
pound of dry coal under 14,600. The price was also subject to a 
decrease at the rate of 4 cents per ton for each per cent of ash over 
8 per cent in the dry coal. Under this contract 4,570 gross tons of 
bituminous coal were received during the year and 30 cars, or 
approximately 1,500 gross tons, shipped for the pumping stations 
during the miners' strike, were diverted by the United States Rail- 
road Administration. At the close of the year there are 1,103 gross 
tons of bituminous coal on hand at the pumping stations. 

Anthracite coal yard screenings have been purchased from various 
dealers during the year from time to time when favorable prices 
were offered. The total amount purchased was 2,900 gross tons and 
the price paid per gross ton varied from $2.53 to $4.98, an average 
of $3.83 for screenings delivered on trucks at the stations. At the 



82 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



close of the year there were 1,500 gross tons of. anthracite screenings 
on hand at the stations. 

By spreading bituminous coal and anthracite screenings in alter- 
nate layers in the bins very satisfactory results have been obtained 
from mixtures containing from 30 to 50 per cent of the screenings. 
A noticeable saving has been made by using the mixed fuel and there 
has been a marked decrease in the amount of smoke issuing from the 
chimneys. 

The amount and cost of the coal received at the pumping stations 
during 1919 are as follows: — 



Dealer and Kind of Coal. 



Stations (Amount in Gross Tons). 



a cs 

ce a 



__, 












H 


H 


-U c> 


+j ra 


3 • 


3 • 


a~ 


C M 






go O 


go O 


Jfc 




o 


O 



T3 
C 
O 

Ph 

O 

a 



a 
Ph 






■*-> o 

Q 



Bituminous. 
George E. Warren Co., 
E. Russell Norton, . 
George E. Warren Co., 
E. Russell Norton, . 
Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co. 
George E. Warren Co., 
E. Russell Norton, . 
Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co., 
George E. Warren Co., 

E. Russell Norton, . 
Shaftsbury Coal & Coke Co., 
George E. Warren Co., 

F. W. Darling Co., . 

Totals, . . 

Average cost: — 

In bins, .... 

On cars and trucks, 

Anthracite Screenings 
Batchelder Bros., 
Brighton Coal Co., . 
Metropolitan Coal Co., . 
John A. Whittemore's Sons, 
Metropolitan Coal Co., . 
John A. Whittemore's Sons, 
Locke Coal Co., 
Wilbur W. Fiske & Co., . 
Batchelder Bros., 
Locke Coal Co., 
Metropolitan Coal Co., . 
Batchelder Bros., 
Batchelder Bros., 

Totals, 

Average cost: — 
In bins, 
On cars and trucks, 



S22.26 6 
89.31 6 



911.57 



S2 53 



1,094.64 
805.94 



1,900.58 



$7 09 
6 54 



136.51 6 
119.976 



256.48 



$5 91 
4 33 



2,812.59 
902.68 
261.83 



3,977.10 



$6 63 
6 48 



651.36 
13.96 6 



665.32 



$4 96 
4 54 



431.06 
189.79 
194.58 



141.88 
98.70 
100.80 



91.78 
2.39 



815.43 



$7 79 
6 78 



341.38 



$6 90 
6 75 



94.17 



6 73 



344.346 
139.65 8 
129.10 6 



100.006 

128.08 6 

44.646 



180.446 



613.09 



$5 62 
4 98 



272.72 



$4 35 
4 05 



180.44 



$2 90 



$6 89 



35 

58 
05 
79 



7 
6 
7 
5 

7 88 

8 40 

6 99 

7 09 
7 51 
605 
6 91 

10 08 



$6 09 
5 71 



05 
.55 
88 
59 
95 
65 
70 
27 
90 



1 I'nloaded in storage pile, later to be transported 300 feet and put into bins. 
- Hoisted from cars and wheeled to bins. 

3 Dumped from cars into bins. 

4 Unloaded at freight yard, teamed bj miles, and dumped into bins. 

5 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to the mixing and storage of 
the coal. 

6 Delivered at station by truck. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



83 



All coal received during the year was sampled and analyzed and 
the results are as follows : — 



Kind of Coal. 


Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


British 

Thermal 

Units. 


Percent- 
age of 
-Volatile 
Matter. 


Percent- 
age 
of Ash. 


Percent- 
age of 
Moisture. 


Percent- 
age 
of Fixed 
Carbon. 


Davenport, .... 


16 


14,634 


19.80 


7.61 


3.07 


72.59 


Shaftsbury, . 


10 


13,661 


20.72 


13.38 


2.75 


65.90 


Nanty-Glo, .... 


61 


14,745 


19.86 


6.68 


3.55 


73.46 


Loyal Hanna Mine No. 6, . 


5 


14,562 


17.05 


7.56 


4.06 


75.39 


"E" Seam, .... 


1 


14,084 


23.21 


11.22 


2.45 


65.57 


Anthracite screenings, 


47 


12,661 


5.04 


14.58 


5.73 


80.38 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 1 new grates were installed in boilers 
Nos. 1, 2 and 11, considerable boiler feed-water piping was renewed, 
and a large amount of general repair work was done on engines Nos. 
1, 2 and 4. New lightning rod tips were installed on the chimney 
and the masonry was repointed where necessary. 

At Chestnut Hill station No. 2 a large amount of general repair 
work was done in the boiler and engine rooms. The double-coil 
heater, purchased in 1917 for utilizing the exhaust steam from the 
dynamo engine for heating the feed water, was installed early in 
1919. The economizers were repaired, new grates were installed in 
boilers Nos. 5 and 15, broken stay bolts were replaced in boilers 
Nos. 15 and 16, a large amount of feed-water piping was renewed 
and two boiler feed pumps were repaired. About 630 square feet 
of the concrete floor in the boiler room was renewed in front of the 
boilers and the drains in the engine room basement and the trestle 
supporting the railroad track over the coal pocket were repaired. 
All of the suction valves in engine No. 12 were equipped with new 
springs; a large amount of general work was done on this engine 
and on engine No. 6 and the 6-inch steam main was anchored to 
the engine room wall to prevent vibration. An independent air 
pump, purchased for use in connection with all of the engines, was 
received late in the year and is now being installed. 

Six steel one cubic yard capacity V body tip cars, purchased to 
facilitate the removal of all of the ashes during the first watch, 
were received just before the end of the year, but the new arrange- 
ment has not been given a trial. 



84 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The cast-iron cap on the chimney, which was badly corroded by 
the flue gases, was replaced with a reinforced concrete cap covered 
with f-inch sheet lead. New lightning rod tips were installed and 
the chimney was repointed for a distance of 20 feet below the cap. 

At these stations 25,765,740,000 gallons of water were pumped 
during the year, of which 15,167,850,000 gallons were supplied to the 
southern high-service district and the southern extra high-service 
pumping station, and the remainder, 10,597,890,000 gallons, were 
supplied to the southern low-service district. The average daily 
pumpage was 41,555,800 gallons for the high service and 29,035,300 
gallons for the low service, with a maximum of 51,550,500 gallons 
on December 18 for the high service and 52,414,300 gallons on Jan- 
uary 13 for the low service. 

The pumping statistics for these stations for 1919 are as follows: — 

Station No. 1 . 

Pumpage and Duty. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 
Pumping time (engine hours), .... 
Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), 
Duty, average (foot-pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



16 

4,008.00 

1,365.57 

3,741,300 

133.06 



20 

202.90 

165.96 

454,700 

128.05 



30 

703.50 

926.23 

2,537,600 

125.08 



66 

4.914.40 

2,457.76 

6,733,600 

129.71 

3,241,896 

1,202,489 

59,750,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 
Cost of Pumping. 





Totals. 


Per 
Million 
Gallons. 


Per 
Million 
Foot- 
Gallons. 


Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 


Labor (operation and superintendence), 


$16,940 31 


$6 89 


Cents. 
5.31 


Cents. 
1.69 


Fuel 


13,730 70 


5 59 


4.31 


1.37 


Repairs, 


10,171 46 


4 14 


3.19 


1.02 


Oil, waste and packing, 


698 81 


28 


.22 


.07 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


1,015 59 


41 


.32 


.10 


Totals 


$42,556 87 


$17 31 


13.35 


4.25 


Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 


33,798 83 


13 75 


10.60 


3.38 



No. 



0/ . 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



85 



Station No. 2. 
Pumpage and Duty. 



Engines 
Xos. 5, 

6 and 7. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 

Pumping time (engine hours) 

Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), 
Duty, average (foot-pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



105 

10,204.00 

10,597.89 

29,035,300 

29.70 



40 

8,121.10 

12,710.09 

34,822,200 

122.48 



145 

18,325.10 

23,307.98 

63,857,500 

80.29 

9,702,307 

3,496,834 

118,110,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 
Million 
Gallons. 



Per 
Million 
Foot- 
gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence), 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals 



Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



S40.876 62 

42,370 82 

17,040 97 

1,595 56 

1,591 54 



$103,475 51 
35,607 56 



SI 75 

1 82 

73 

07 

07 



S4 44 
1 53 



Cents. 
2.18 

2.26 

.91 

.09 
.09 



5.53 
1.90 



Cents. 
.69 

.72 

.29 

.03 

.03 



1.76 
.61 



As it was necessary to operate the boilers in one battery most of 
the time the duties of the individual engines were not determined 
except by special tests in April and December. The results of these 
tests are shown in the accompanying table. 



86 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



Duty Trials. 

Engine No. 12. 
[24 hours' duration.] 



April 16-17. 



April 21-22. 



December 
23-24. 



Pumpage (million gallons), 1 

Lift average (feet), 

Coal (pounds), 

Water evaporated per pound of coal — actual (pounds), 

Water evaporated per pound of coal — from and at 212° 

(pounds). 
Duty (million foot-pounds per 100 pounds of coal), 



35.805 
121.750 
24,274. 000 2 



149.834 



38.281 
122.190 
28,515.0003 



136.858 



39.913 

123920 

28,113.000* 

9.820 

10.460 

146.814 



Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 5 
[24 hours' duration.] 



April 23-24. 



April 28-29. 



December 
30-31. 



Pumpage (million gallons), 1 

Lift average (feet), 

Coal (pounds), 

Water evaporated per pound of coal — actual (pounds), 

Water evaporated per pound of coal — from and at 212* 

(pounds). 
Duty (million foot-pounds per 100 pounds of coal), 



24.570 

28.770 

8,503.0003 

9.360 

9.950 

69.354 



26.619 
29.940 
,132. 000 2 
9.570 
10.220 
81.777 



49.727 
30.220 
12,911.000* 
9.820 
10.180 
97.116 



Regular Service. 
[7 days' duration.] 





Engine 
No. 12. 


Engines Nos. 5, 

6, 7 and 12 and All 

Auxiliaries. 5 




December 
23-30. 


December 
23-30. 


December 30- 
January 7. 


Pumpage (million gallons), 1 

Lift average (feet), 

Water evaporated per pound of coal — actual (pounds), 
Duty (million foot-pounds per 100 pounds of coal), . 


271.795 
124.050 
192,896. 000 * 

145.855 


602.969 
71.980 
303,361. 000 4 
9.330 
119.487* 


594.852 
74.920 
305,456.000* 
9.670 
121.7476 



1 Plunger displacement. 

2 Bituminous coal 100 per cent. 

rt Bituminous coal 60 per cent; anthracite screenings 40 per cent. 

* Bituminous coal 70 per cent; anthracite screenings 30 per cent. 

8 Engines operating at from 50 to 90 per cent of full capacity during test. 

6 No allowance for heating and lighting. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



87 



Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

At the Spot Pond pumping station engine No. 9 was out of service 
from November 8 to November 15 on account of a broken wrist 
plate, stud and steam valve rods on the high pressure valve gear. 

In addition to the repairs on this engine considerable work was 
necessary on the fuel economizer, boilers and steam main. 

A ventilating duct was erected from the top of the storage tank 
of the ash conveyor through the roof of the station to carry off the 
dust and steam. 

All of the water supplied to the northern high-service district was 
pumped at this station. The pumps were operated about 12 hours per 
day, the boilers being maintained with banked fires when not in use. 

The northern high -service pumping statistics for 1919 are as fol- 
lows : — 

Spot Pond Station. 
Pumpage and Duty. 



Engine 
No. 8. 



Engine 
No. 9. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 
Pumping time (engine hours), .... 
Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), . 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), . 

Duty, average (foot-pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



10 

233.60 

95.69 

262,000 

122.64 

61,980 

41,420 

94,540,000 



20 

3,511.10 

2,964.11 

8,121,000 

132.93 

1,857,086 

1,221,565 

106,610,000 



30 

3,744.70 

3,059.80 

8,383,000 

132.60 

1,919,066 

1,262,985 

106,220,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 










Totals. 


Per 
Million 
Gallons. 


Per 
Million 
Foot- 
gallons. 


Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 


Labor (operation and superintendence), 


$12,957 59 


$4 23 


Cents. 
3.19 


Cents. 
1.02 


Fuel 


9,956 77 


3 25 


2.45 


.78 


Repairs, 


2,161 82 


71 


.54 


.17 


Oil, waste and packing, 


576 15 


19 


.14 


.04 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


570 70 


19 


.14 


.04 


Totals, 


$26,223 03 


$8 57 


6.46 


2.05 


Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 


16,567 78 


5 41 


4.08 


1.30 



ss 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

All of the water supplied to the northern extra high-service district 
during the year was pumped at the Arlington pumping station from 
the northern low-service mains. Only a few minor repairs have been 
necessary at this station during the year. 

The northern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1919 are 
as follows : — 

Arlington Station. 

Pumpage and Duty. 



Engine 
No. 10. 



Engine 
No. 11. 



Engine 
No. 15. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 
Pumping time (engine hours), .... 
Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), 
Duty, average (foot-pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



1.50 

7,657.70 

306.80 

840,500 

279.92 

699,639 

665,396 

52,410,000 



1.50 

3.80 

.07 

200 

276.57 

241 

239 

33,600,000 



3 

65.80 

4.81 

13,200 

294.62 

24,055 

540 

48,000,000 



6 

7,727.30 

311.68 

853,900 

280.14 

723,935 

666,175 

52,320,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 

Million 
Gallons. 



Per 
Million 
Foot- 
gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence), 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



$9,433 64 

3,708 40 

875 78 

138 60 

322 28 



$14,478 70 
5,989 02 



$30 27 

11 90 

2 81 

44 

1 03 



Cents. 
10.80 

4.25 

1.00 

.16 

.37 



$46 45 
19 22 



16.58 
6.86 



Cents. 
3.44 

1.35 

.32 

.05 

.12 



5.28 
2.18 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



89 



Hyde Park Pumping Station. 

All of the water supplied to the southern extra high-service district 
was repumped at the Hyde Park pumping station from the southern 
high-service mains, the pumps being operated about 11 hours per 
day, the boilers being maintained with banked fires when not in use. 
The cross head and connecting rod boxes on engine No. 13 were re- 
fitted and the pump valves were turned down. 

The southern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1919 are as 
follows : — 

Hyde Park Station. 

Pumpage and Duty. 



Engine 
No. 13. 



Engine 
Xo. 14. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 

Pumping time (engine hours) 

Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), 
Duty, average (foot-pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



3 

3,153.50 

190.81 

522,800 

139.28 

200,475 
293,158 

44,850,000 



3 

1,106.60 

65 . 45 

179,300 

138.65 

70,417 

104,310 

43,260,000 



6 

4,260.10 

256.26 

702,100 

139.12 

270,892 

397,468 

44,430,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 

Million 

Gallons. 



Per 
Million 
Foot- 
gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence), 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals, 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



>8,759 67 

1,754 52 

719 24 

378 29 

377 19 



S34 18 
6 85 
2 81 
1 47 
1 47 



§11,988 91 
5,179 39 



$46 78 
20 21 



Cents. 
24.57 

4.92 

2.02 

1.06 

1.06 



33.63 
14.53 



Cents. 
7.82 

1.57 

.64 

.34 
.34 



10.71 
4.63 



90 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Distribution Reservoirs. 

The locations, elevations and capacities of the distribution reser- 
voirs of the Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following 
table: — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations. 


Elevation of 
High Water. 1 


Capacity in 
Gallons. 


Low Service: — 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton District of Boston, 

Weston Reservoir, Weston 

Northern High Service: — 

Northern Extra High Service : — 
Southern High Service: — 

Southern Extra High Service: — 
Bellevue Reservoir Steel Tank, West Roxbury District of Boston, . 


163.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.00 

251.00 
264.50 
192 00 
251.00 

375.00 


1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

550,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 


Total 


- 


2,399,230,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 



By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the main- 
tenance of its reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the Met- 
ropolitan W 7 ater Works, and the reservoir is used when necessary in 
connection with the northern high-service supply. The reservoir has 
a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons with high water line at elevation 
196.6. It was put into service January 11, the repairs to stop 
leakage, which were begun under very unfavorable conditions late 
in 1918, having been completed. As there was still some leakage 
from the reservoir it was shut off again on April 11 and in September 
further repairs were undertaken, which were completed October 20. 
The reservoir was filled on the following day and no further leak- 
age has occurred. The reservoir was put into service again on 
November 2o. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 



Westdn Reservoir. 

The inlet chamber and the screen chamber at the Weston Reservoir 
and the terminal chamber of the lower Weston Aqueduct were kept 
in good condition. The operation of the screens has required a large 
amount of attention. Riprap, beaches, lawns, walks, drives, drains, 
fences and grounds about the reservoir were given the necessary 
attention to keep them in good order. 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs. 

The gate-houses and screens and the shrubs, walks, drives, fences 
and grounds at the Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill 
reservoirs were cared for as usual. 

At Chestnut Hill Reservoir the driveway between the Bradlee 
and Lawrence basins was given a surface coat of fine stone and 
tarvia. The iron floor of the terminal chamber of the Sudbury 
Aqueduct and of effluent gate-house No. 2 were painted and the 
ceiling of the latter was varnished and the woodwork painted. New 
doors were provided at the entrance to effluent gate-house No. 1, the 
interior doors were painted, roof and windows were repaired and 
concrete posts were made for the proposed fence on Beacon Street 
at this place. Stalls and windows were repaired at the stable, the 
exterior and interior woodwork of the garage was painted and the 
cornice was waterproofed. 

On account of the strike of a portion of the Boston police force a 
company of the State Guard was billeted in the stable at the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir from September 11 to October 6. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

At Spot Pond and the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs the gate- 
houses, walks, shrubs and grounds have received the usual care. 
Gates have been operated and screens have been cleaned as re- 
quired. The interior and exterior woodwork at all gate-houses was 
painted and the weir at the outlet of the drainage system in Virginia 
Woods was repaired. The former Bottume house at Spot Pond has 
been occupied by the subforeman in charge of the labor forces since 
September 1. 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Bellevue and Forbes Hill Reservoirs. 

Bellevue Reservoir has been in service throughout the year, and 
the standpipe and tower have received the usual care. Forbes Hill 
Reservoir has been kept full of water for emergency use; the stand- 
pipe has been in service throughout the year. The outside of the 
lower plates of the stand-pipe and the woodwork of the tower and 
the iron stairs were painted. Some work has been done on the 
erection of a new fence on the southeasterly boundary line of the 
water works land. 

Arlington and Mystic Reservoirs. . 

The Arlington standpipe has been in service throughout the year. 
It is very much in need of painting but as it is planned to replace 
the structure with a larger tank before long the painting of the 
existing tank has been deferred. The Mystic Reservoir was out of 
service until November 4 but was kept full for emergency use, except 
during July, August and September when the brick lining was being 
repaired. The stone coping, which had been thrown considerably out 
of line near the gate-house by frost, was set back on line. An iron 
fence 4 feet in height has been erected around the reservoir during 
the year. It is located just back of the coping stone about 2.5 feet 
from the water. The fence posts are 3-inch steel I beams with cast- 
iron ornamental caps; rails are 2-inch steel angles and the pickets 
are 1^-inch steel angles pointed at the top and spaced 6 inches apart. 
The fence, which is 1,833 feet in length, cost $4,856 or $2.65 per 
linear foot. 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station. 

These structures, which were acquired from the city of Boston in 
1898 and have not been used since for water supply purposes, were 
given only such attention as necessary to keep them in repair. The 
discharge of the water from Mystic Lake at the wasteway at the 
dam was regulated so as to keep the water in the lake just below 
high-water line, except when it was drawn down in anticipation of 
large yields from the watershed, as at such times some storage is 
necessary for satisfactory regulation. 

The American Radio & Research Corporation has occupied the 
old Mystic pumping station during the entire year manufacturing 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

material for the United States Government, permission having been 
granted for such occupancy until March 1, 1920. 

Further repairs have been made at the house and barn located 
near the station. 

Grounds at Arlington and Hyde Park Pumping Stations. 

The lawns, shrubs, drives and fences at the Arlington and Hyde 
Park pumping stations were given the usual attention and are in 
good condition. 

Distribution Pipe Lines. 

The length of distribution pipe lines owned and operated at the 
close of the year is 126.08 miles, an increase of 1.81 miles during 
the year. In connection with the maintenance of the pipe lines 
they have been regularly patrolled and the work of municipalities 
and public service corporations in the vicinity of the pipe lines has 
been inspected. The location of each valve chamber has been 
plainly stenciled on objects along the line so that valves can be 
readily found when desired. The valves have been kept in good 
working condition, the valve chambers were cleaned and the frames 
and covers were regulated to conform to the grades of the streets 
where necessary. The covers over important valves were covered 
with salt during cold weather to keep them free from ice. 

Low-service Mains. 

The work of raising the two 24-inch low-service mains, located 
between Condor Street and Chelsea Creek in East Boston, which 
was undertaken by the Boston & Lockport Block Company in 1918, 
in connection with the enlargement of its plant on account of war 
work, has been practically completed during the year. The final 
connection on the easterly line was made January 13 and the line 
put into service. The work of filling under and around the mains 
was resumed in June and is now practically completed. 

The 16-inch Venturi meter tube in the by-pass around the 24-inch 
valve near the gate-house at Mystic Reservoir was removed early in 
November and the branches were capped. 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Pipe Bridges. 

A new top was placed on the wooden box around the steel pipe 
at the Stony Brook crossing in Hyde Park Avenue in West Roxbury 
and the sides of the box were repaired. The roof and floor of the 
pipe box over the Boston & Maine Railroad at Walnut Street, Som- 
erville, were removed for extensive repairs, and minor repairs were 
made on roof and sides of the pipe box at the Chelsea North Bridge, 
to the floor of the pipe boxes over the Boston & Maine Railroad at 
College Avenue in Medford and at Webster Avenue in Somerville. 

Pipe Yards. 

The side track at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard was repaired for a 
length of 1,550 feet, by contract, in August, at a cost of $1,180. 
The roadbed was regraded and the rails were lined up, using 324 
new ties cut by water works employees on the Wachusett Reservoir 
lands. Minor repairs were made at the yard office, the carpenter 
shop and the shed, and the water service pipes were renewed at the 
office and blacksmith shop. 

At the Glenwood pipe yard minor repairs were made in the interior 
of the office building and the steam heating plant is being renewed. 
The platform of the yard scale was relaid with 3-inch hard pine 
plank in October and a new derrick is being installed. 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages. 

During the year two Venturi meters were installed on the low- 
service mains in Washington Street, Brookline. The Venturi meters 
on the low-service relief pipe at Chestnut Hill Reservoir and on the 
by-pass at Mystic Reservoir were removed. On account of unau- 
thorized use of water from the Commercial Street fire main in 
Maiden the city was required to set a 12-inch x 6-inch Hersey de- 
tector meter at the connection of the fire main with the Metropolitan 
Water W^orks northern high-service main in Pleasant Street. This 
meter was placed in service August 1. 

At the close of the year there were 69 Venturi meters varying in 
size from 6 inches to 60 inches in diameter, 8 Hersey detector meters, 
4 Hersey disc meters and 1 Hersey torrent meter owned and operated 
by the Metropolitan Water Works and connected with the distribu- 
tion mains, which, with the exception of 9 of the Venturi meters, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

1 detector meter and 1 disc meter, were in use for measuring the 
water supplied to the various municipalities in the Metropolitan 
Water District. There were also 3 disc meters, 1 detector meter, 
3 Union meters and 1 Crown meter connected with the distribution 
mains but not owned by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

Three men and a light auto truck are now used in the operation 
and care of the meters which are visited regularly twice each week. 
They are also given such additionel attention as is necessary to keep 
them in repair and operating satisfactorily. 

The 8 pressure regulating valves installed in the distribution mains 
for reducing the pressure of water supplied to portions of Chelsea, 
East Boston and Hyde Park and to Nahant, Revere, Swampscott 
and Winthrop have received the usual attention and have controlled 
the water pressures in a satisfactory manner. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 20 stations on 
the Metropolitan Water Works, and the table in Appendix No. 2, 
showing the elevation of the hydraulic grade line at 18 of these 
stations, has been prepared from the charts. 

Breaks and Leaks. 

A crack 1.3 feet in length was discovered in the 16-inch northern 
high-service main in Beach Street, near Broadway, Revere, on 
May 29. The cost of repairing this break was S62.ll. 

In October and November six joint leaks were repaired in the 
westerly 36-inch pipe line under the Mystic River at the Wellington 
Bridge. It was necessary to employ a diver for this work, which 
cost $1,052.70. 

In December three joint leaks were repaired in the easterly 36-inch 
main under the Charles River at Magazine Street, Cambridge. This 
work was also done by a diver and cost $1,795.90. 

There were 38 minor joint leaks repaired in the distribution mains 
during the year, of which 7 were defective wooden joints which were 
repaired at a cost of $184.02, and the remaining 31 were defective 
lead joints which were repaired at a cost of $866.51. 

Emergency Pipe Line Service. 

The two f-ton auto trucks, equipped with special bodies and gate 
operating attachments, put into service in 1917 for operating valves 
quickly in case of emergency, have been in service during the entire 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

year. One of the trucks is stationed at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard 
in Brighton for use on the southern portion of the distribution pipe 
system and the other is stationed at the Glenwood pipe yard in 
Medford for use on the northern portion of the pipe system. Men 
are kept on duty ready to operate the trucks in case of emergency 
at any time during the day or night. 

Consumption of Water. 

The total quantity of water furnished to the 18 municipalities 
supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the year 1919, 
as measured by the water works meters, is 44,016,611,000 gallons, 
which is equivalent to an average consumption of 120,593,500 gallons 
per day. On the basis of an estimated population of 1,267,080 this 
is equivalent to a consumption of 95 gallons per capita per day, 
which is a reduction of 10 gallons per capita per day, or 9.5 per cent, 
from the per capita consumption for 1918, and is attributed to the 
reduced industrial activity resulting from the termination of the war 
and to the mild winter. With a return to normal conditions and the 
resumption of the work of installing meters on the service pipes, 
which was interrupted to a considerable extent by the war, a further 
reduction in the per capita consumption is anticipated for the future. 
It is of interest to note on the accompanying diagram that as a 
result of installing meters on service pipes the per capita consump- 
tion is now 7 per cent less than in 1898 when the Metropolitan 
W T ater Works were put into service 22 years ago. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipali- 
ties supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during 1918 and 
1919, as measured by the Metropolitan Water Works meters, is as 
follows: — 



POPULATION, CONSUMPTION OF WATER and PER CENT OF SERVICES METERED 

IN THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1919 

























FROM 1890 


TO 


1919 
























































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1890 1892 



1894 



1896 



1898 1900 I90Z 1904 1906 1908 1910 1912 1914 1916 1918 1920 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



97 











Estimated 


Average Daily Consumption. 




1918. 


1919. 






Popula- 










Decrease 














tion, 1919. 




Gallons 




Gallons 


in 






Gallons. 


per 

Capita. 


Gallons. 


per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Arlington, .... 


17,530 


1,290,300 


76 


1,085,700 


62 


204,600 


Belmont, . 








9,710 


577,700 


62 


564,000 


58 


13,700 


Boston, 








804,140 


94,634,000 


120 


89,652,400 


111 


4,981,600 


Chelsea, . 








48,840 


3,501,200 


74 


3,158,400 


65 


342,800 


Everett, . 








41,610 


3,365,800 


83 


2,886,700 


69 


479,100 


Lexington, 








6,020 


494,600 


84 


389,200 


65 


105,400 


Maiden, . 








53,150 


3,254,700 


62 


2,682,800 


50 


571,900 


Medford, . 








35,860 


2,161,200 


62 


1,688,500 


47 


472,700 


Melrose, . 








18,170 


1,180,600 


66 


1,057,100 


58 


123,500 


Milton, 








9,450 


434,500 


47 


401,300 


42 


33,200 


Nahant, . 








1,570 


228,200 


149 


186,900 


116 


41,300 


Quincy, . 








45,280 


4,632,100 


105 


4,550,100 


100 


82,000 


Revere, 








30,640 


1,975,500 


67 


1,780,700 


58 


194,800 


Somerville, 








94,800 


7,433,200 


80 


6,541,500 


69 


891,700 


Stoneham, 








7,840 


617,700 


80 


602,400 


77 


15,300 


Swampscott, 








8,160 


606,100 


76 


570,900 


70 


35,200 


Water town, 








19,140 


2,434,700 


131 


2,002,900 


105 


431,800 


Winthrop, 








15,170 


941,900 


65 


792,000 


52 


149,900 


District, 






• 


1,267,080 


129,764,000 


105 


120,593,500 


95 


9,170,500 



This table shows that there was a decrease in consumption in 1919 
as compared with the previous year in every city and town in the 
district. The consumption by districts in 1919 as compared with the 
consumption in these districts during the previous year is as fol- 
lows : — 





Gallons 

per Day, 

1919. 


Decrease from 1918. 




Gallons 
per Day. 


Percent- 
age. 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, . 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, ........... 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, .... 


42,407,800 
24,677,900 
43,059,400 

8,893,500 
668,400 
886,500 


4,430,200 
1,750,400 
1,572,400 

1,108,000 
125,200 
184,300 


9.46 
6.62 
3.52 

11.08 
15.78 
17.21 


Totals 


120,593,500 


9,170,500 


7.07 



Installation of Meters on Service Pipes. 
Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes 
by the municipalities supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works is given in the accompanying table. 



98 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Per 

Cent of 
Services 
metered 
Dec. 31, 
1919. 


OOtDNOOOiHOOOOmNMNOOOOM 
OO^MOSNNOfflO^OOeiNOOOOlO 


oo 

CM 
CO 


OOOOJ®OONOOOO'*OONOOOOi 
0«0)00!0>000^0)NM»000! 

1—1 1—1 T— 1 1— 1 1—1 1—1 


Total 
Services 
equipped 

with 
Meters 
Dec. 31, 

1919. 


tOi*iOOOHOOH(OOOONOONOOiflM 
TjiOJOiHOOrHffiNOONtOMOJlONOOWOO 
NNONOMONCOHIflOO !>•_ -*_ CD O^ CO CK 

co t-Tt^" \ri TjT^-Tt>r«o tjTcnT oTco o i-Ti-Tcocsr 

CO i-l 


CO 
CO 

1-1 


Total 
Services 

in Use 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 


CD-*t<OOCOCOCOOT-iT-loCOT-li-iTf<-*t<OOiC>r-» 
M<05l>.-^05CNlCNlt^C0t^OC0t^(Mt^00lOC3i 
CM t- CJ5_CM OMINN ■*. ,_, <>" °0 Nin!D»«» 

co i-TirTkO o i-Too to t^cnT O tJ< CO i— 1 t-TcO CN 
O i-i i-l 
I— 1 


00 

«o 

00 


New 
Services 
equipped 

with 
Meters 
Dec. 31, 

1919.1 


CMO'*«N|i-10COOCOt~-'«*<'^t l COlO'>*<C<3CJ5TH 

i((^T)(tDTl*OOOOOCOOOtCIP3iHNlOCOtDCO 
^Ot0000>l0<NNO«XNi000OM!0 "*_05 

i-ii-icoi-i t-TcnTi-T -^"i-HCNr i-T 


00 
CO 

co 


New 

Services 

installed 

and in 

Use 

Dec. 31, 

1919.1 


CMOOi02i-HO-*OC01^COOiCOCN)-*C005'!j< 

•>*'<*T)ICDiJIOOOOOOOO'OMCSroif300tOtO 
^00>0001lOP3NOOOMO)OOOMtD ■* d 

t-1 i— l lO i— l i— 1 CM t— 1 M* i— 1 CM i-l 


00 

o> 

O 


Number 
of Meters 
required 
to be set 
on Old 
Services 
1908-1919, 
inclusive. 


O I CD O •* ■* 00 OO OO 1 NOtONON 1 O 
CO lO OO CM 00 CO ■* CM OiCOlOCOOOlO O 
CO lOcOOM H^( i— H^ 0_05 !>. CM CM 

CMi-TcO cfi-T Cm"i-h-* i-l 


CD 

OS 

CO 

CO 
CD 


Meters 
Set 

on Old 
Services 
1908-1919, 
inclusive. 


Oi 1 •* CO ■* O ■'t' Oi "5 1 itcCOOClOOCO | OS 

CO ■* in N lO tD OO Oi i—l CM CM CM 0O i-l "# 

OS (MlOOCI 1 ^M CM OO 00_O5_CM_-<3< Ci_ 

1O1-1CO ' COCM Mh^h i-T 


o 

CO 


Old 
Services 
equipped 

with 
Meters 
Dec. 31, 

1919. 


■^•"^•rttoooocoi-icocoi^cocoioooincooi 

OiOMif'^COHMnoOOOMN'iOCOrt 
OOt^i*<COi-H>.t~OCOCMCOCOC5iCO CO CO oo_o_ 
i-T O CO CO CO ■* CO i1~ HST-ToOT-Trl tH CM 


CM 

00 

03 


Old 

Services 

in Use 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 


TitTfOiTtlCqtOiOrHOOCOONiOMOL'StOM 
OlOMNW^MNOlOOrHOlNCOINOOOM 
OONOCOrHNOSOMN^OOOOTHMMOOO 
ri O»io" co"-"*"cOi-1 lOWrH i-T t-Ti-Tcm" 
Oi 1 


00 
CO 


Number 

of Meters 

required 

to be set 

on Old 

Services 

Each 

Year. 


tO 1 CD O CM CM ■* O OS 1 CO O 00 i-l lO i-l I O 

1*5 t- rfi »0 CO i-i l>- i-i ii CO CO i-i CO CM O 

CM^i-1 CM i-l i-l CM t-1 ■<*• i-l 


oo 
o 

CO 


Services 
equipped 

with 
Meters 
Dec. 31, 

1907. 


1«CMOCMCOOOCMOO»OOOOOCDOCMCDO 
mosOSttrHCOOOOOiOOOOJOOiOTfCOOSMN 
oo i>- t - h .^ t -' ^^ P. *. '*,'"-' ""*. oo O0_ 
lOH CO~ i—l l— t i—l CO i—< 


CM 

o 

lO 
CO 
CM 


Services 

in Use 

Dec. 31, 

1907. 


C35CMCMC0'-1O»«00C55U5Oi-Hl0CM^ir>.C0TtH 
N»illOtOMlON(MOOHO)NtOCOOOON 
C55l>-05CO»-tt--.OCC '^,CM_t*I O O0 tO_CO CO 00_O 

i-T co co »o t^-^ coth co cm i—i i— ii— ii— i cm 

OS T-1 


o 
cnT 


1* 
o 

H 

« 

o 

H 

M 

o 


















Arlington, . 

Belmont, 

Boston, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, • . 

Lexington, . 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Milton, 

Nahant, 

Quincy, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Swampscott, 

Water town, . 

Winthrop, . 


co" 

o 
H 





^ 



rfa 



a b 



o 



CO ^ 



P 

c 

•J .s 

1 " 

° 2 

^ ft 

§ s 

03 x 
fl » 
O G 

o 



o 



a o 



CM ^ 
CM fi 

o w 

•+J CO 

-a* 

§ w 

<v> O 

* a 
-^r o 



tfl 
03 

a 
o 






I—l m 

,c3 -o 



T3 

CO 

ft 

ft 

• ft 



co t3 



oj fQ *o co 

^t ^j o co 

T-1 T3 

00 o* 

■^fi 03 

■ .§ 

co > 

S © 

co 



fi.2 o 



C3 



a^ 



>> o 



T3 E 

fl CO 

el ft 

'oi OT 



on ^5 

co 3 

^ s 

OJ 



O r-l 

+» o» 

CO d 

- CO 

O" ^ 

CO co 

CO "** 



"^ <w CO OO 
— ! n co ,—1 



ft 00 
03 O 

o ^ 

^" B 

05 "^ 

^ d 
«« o 
o ".js 

^ CO 

3 « « 

2 m d 

CQ .3 -d 
to T3 J3 

ag.2 

-d SR ti 
7-^ _C0 CO 

CO »l 

o 



a £ 

CO rt 

-d 
H 



° "OS 

n O 
CO t- 

6-S 

d co 
o o 

co > 
O »i 
^ CO 
00 



o 



t-" co T3 
ca oo d 



OB 



« 



3 co » 

en Hi ^ 
co rd S 



'-X CO 
O 02 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



99 



During 1919 2,191 service pipes and 2,965 meters were installed 
in the municipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works, 
and at the close of the year 185,187 service pipes and 135,697 
meters were in use; 73.28 per cent of all the service pipes had been 
provided with meters; in six of the municipalities all of the service 
pipes were equipped with meters, and in three other municipalities 
over 99 per cent of the service pipes were equipped with meters. 



Water supplied Outside op Metropolitan Water District. 

During the year 441,943,000 gallons of water were supplied from 
the Metropolitan Water Works for use outside the Metropolitan 
Water District as follows : — 



Places supplied. 


Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Quantity 

(Gallons 

per Day). 


Number of 

Days on 

which Water 

was 

supplied. 


Amounts 

charged 

for Water 

supplied. 


Westborough State Hospital, . 
Town of Framingham: — 

From Sudbury Aqueduct, .... 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, 
United States Government: — 

Portion of town of Saugus, .... 


64,398,000 

171,300,000 
175,500,000 

20,279,000 
10,466,000 


176,400 

471,901 
480,822 

55,600 
28,700 


365 

363 
365 

365 
365 


SI, 931 94 

4,111 20 
336 58 

1,272 43 
580 00 



Quality of the Water. 

The yearly average results of the chemical analyses, made by the 
State Department of Health since 1892, and of the biological and 
bacteriological examinations, made in the Metropolitan Water Works 
laboratory, of water from service taps in Boston since 1898, are 
given in tables in Appendix No. 2. 



Engineering. 
In connection with the maintenance of the works the engineering 
force has made plans, estimates and reports for various projects and 
improvements; has made record plans of water works lands and 
structures and surveys and plans for land purchases and takings; 
has tested meters; made photographs, blue prints and analyses of 
coal and oil; calculated yields of watersheds; made current meter 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

gagings; kept hydraulic and meteorological records; summarized 
power station and pumping station records; cared for the recording 
pressure gages and supervised various water works operations. 

Appended to this report are tables giving additional information 
relating to the operations of the Metropolitan Water Works for the 
year 1919 and the usual water works statistics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. FOSS, 

Director and Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 2, 1920. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 101 



EEPOET OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 
OF SEWERAGE DIVISION. 



James A. Bailey, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

The following report of the operations of the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Works for the year ending December 31, 1919, is respectfully 
submitted : — 

Organization. 

The Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the 
works controlled by the Metropolitan District Commission for re- 
moving sewage from the twenty-six municipalities which comprise 
the Metropolitan Sewerage districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year: — 

Henry T. Stiff, .... Senior Assistant Engineer, in charge of office 

and drafting room and of the construction 
work. 

Clarence A. Moore, . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of maintenance 

studies and records and of construction 
work on the North Metropolitan System. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey and 

field work in connection with the Wellesley 
Extension construction. 

Ralph W. Loud, .... Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey and 

field work in connection with the Reading 
Extension construction. 

George W. Wood, .... Assistant Engineer, on Reading Extension. 

In addition to the above, the number of engineering and other 
assistants employed during the year was 16, which includes 2 super- 
intendents, 2 instrumentmen, 4 inspectors, 2 draftsmen, 4 rodmen 
and engineering assistants and 2 stenographers. 



102 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 
Areas and Populations. . 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage districts. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1915. 



Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 81, 1919. 



City or Town. 


Area (Square 
Miles). 


Estimated 
Population. 




Arlington, 


5.20 


17,840 




Belmont, 


















' 4.66 


9,910 




Boston (portions 


of), 
















3.45 


112,520 




Cambridge, 


















6.11 


114,120 




Chelsea, 


















2.24 


49,480 


g 


Everett, 


















3.34 


42,070 


s 


Lexington, ' . 


















5.11 


4,500 


o o 


Maiden, 
Medford, 


















5.07 
8.35 


53,650 
36,480 


Is* 

rC 


Melrose, 


















3.73 


18,330 


Reading, 


















9.82 


8,040 


u 
O 


Revere, 


















5.86 


31,280 


Somerville, . 


















3.96 


95,740 




Stoneham, . 


















5.50 


7,880 




Wakefield, . 


















7.65 


14,030 




Winchester, . 


















5.95 


11,040 




Winthrop, . 


















1.61 


15,460 




i Woburn, 


















12.71 


17,160 


















inn ■"> 


fi^n ^ti 




Boston (portions of), . 
















24.96 


ooy, oou 
298,160 




Brookline, . 
















6.81 


38,350 


43 


Dedham, * . 


















9.40 


12,430 


P.2 


Milton, 


















12.59 


9,550 


II' 


Newton, 


















16.88 


46,330 


2s 

3 


Quincy, 


















12.56 


45,820 


Waltham, 


















13.63 


32,570 


o 


Watertown, . 


















4.04 


19,440 




Wellesley, . 


















9.89 


7,450 




ifn 7fi 


e^i n mn 




"■ " llu. <D 


OIU, 1UU 


Totals, 


211.08 


1,169,630 



1 Part of town. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there have been built 1.680 miles of Metropolitan 
sewers within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 114.920 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts. The remaining 105.278 miles of sewers 
and other works have been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems: — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







GO 


i i 

OS • 


Special Connections. 






3 






S a 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 




Op,rt 
~ 


Character or Location of 


0) c8 






+3 

a 


ublic 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


a a 






tl 


PM 




!< 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


4' 0" to 9' 0", . 


1.653 


4 


Shoe factory, .... 


1 


East Boston, 


9' 0" to V 0", . 


5.467 


25 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co., 


1 


Charlestown, 


6' 7"X7' 5" to 1' 0", . 


3.292 


15 { 


Navy Yard, .... 

Private building, . 

Club house, .... 


8 

1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9'0", 


?, 864 


13- 

> 


Fire Department Station, 
Private building, . 

Rendering works, . 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
1 
1 
1 


Chelsea, . 


8' 4"X9' 2" to 15", . 


5.230 


13- 

> 


blow-off, .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs, . _ . 

Naval Hospital, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Cameron Appliance Co., 

Shultz-Goodwin Co., 


1 

2 

1 

1 
1 
1 


Everett, . 


8' 2"X8' 10" to 4' 8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


8- 


Andrews-Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 

Factory, 

New England Structural Co., 


1 
1 

1 

2 

1 


Lexington, 


— ~ 


— 


1 

f 


Metropolitan Water Works 


- 


Maiden, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to V 0", . 


5.8441 


u\ 


blow-off, .... 
Private biiildings, . 


1 

1882 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1898 and by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and made parts 
of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



104 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded. 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 







TO 
CD 


i i 


Special Connections. 






3 






a 


Citt or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.5 


B«-j 


Character or Location of 


f- 2 








O O (D 


Connection. 


SIS 








3-3.Q 




s a 






^ 


fr) 




£° 








c 


Private buildings, . 


1162 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.099 1 


39< 

> 


Factory, .... 

Railroad station, . 

Park Department bathhouse 

Harvard dormitories, 

Slaughterhouse, 




Cambridge, . 


5'2"X5'9"tol'3", . 


•7.209 


45< 

> 


City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop 

Private building, . 

Factory building, . 

Tannery, 

Slaughterhouses (3), 

Car-house, 

Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville, 


6' 5"X7' 2" to 10", . 


3.577 


12- 

> 


off, ... . 
Street railway power house, 
Stable, .... 
Rendering works, . 
Railroad scale pit, . 
Private building, . 
Armory building, . 




Medford, 


4'8"X5' 1" to 10", . 


5.713 


25- 


Private buildings, . 
Stable, .... 
Police substation, . 
Tanneries, 
Private buildings, . 
Gelatine factory, . 
Watch-hand factory, 


I 


Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", . 


9.470 


27< 


Stable, .... 

Railroad station, . 

Felt works, 

Town Hall, . 

Bay State Saw & Tool Co., 

Whitney Machine Co., . 




Stoneham, 


1' 8" to 10", 


1.078 


4 


- - 




Woburn, 


l'10"X2'4"to 1'3", . 


1.040 


3 


Glue factory, . 
Private buildings, . 


161* 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10", 


3.520 3 


43 


Railroad station, . 

Car-house, 

Post office, 


3 

1 


Belmont, 5 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


Wakefield, 


3'0"to 2'0"X2' 3", . 


0.258 


1 


- 


- 


Revere, . 


4' 0" to 15", 


0.136 


3 


- 


- 


Reading, 




- 


- 




- 




65.3756 


318 


557 



1 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896 and with a 
sewer extension built in accordance with Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage System. 

3 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

4 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 and 
made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

5 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Belmont. 

8 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
Metropolitan sewer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



105 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







to 


a> 2 ■ 


Special. Connections. 






3 


Onn 




.2d 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 




Character or Location of 


O 03 








ublic 
tion; 
ber 


Connection. 


►5° 






H 


Ah 




£ 








c 


Tufts Medical School, . 


1 


Boston: — 








Private house, 


1 


Back Bay, . 


6' 6" to 3' 9", . 


1.5001 


16- 


Administration Building, 

Boston Park Department, . 

Simmons College buildings, . 

Art Museum, .... 


1 
1 

2 


Brighton, . 


5'9"X6'0"tol2", . 


6.0102 


15 


Abattoir, .... 
Chocolate works, . 
Machine shop, 


3 
2 
1 


Dorchester, 


3'X4'to2'6"X2'7", . 


2.8703 


13' 


Paper Mill, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion, ..... 
Mattapan Paper Mills, . 


1 
3 

1 
1 


Hyde Park, 


10' 7"XH' 7"to4'0"X4'l", 


4.527 


18 { 


Private buildings, . 


2 








Fairview Cemetery buildings, 


1 


Roxbury, . 


6'6"X7'to4'0", 


1.430 


f 


Caledonia Grove buildings, . 


1 


West Roxbury, . 


9'3"X10'2"to 12", . 


7.643 


* 


Parental School, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church, 

Private buildings, . . 


1 
1 

4 


Brookline, 


6'6"X7'0"to8", 


2.5404 


12 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Dedham, 


4'X4'l"to2'9"X3', . 


3.272 


7 


Dedham Carpet Mills, . 


1 


Hull, 5 . 


60" pipe, . . . . 


0.750 


- 


- - 


— 


Milton, . 


ll'X12'to8", 


3.600 


23 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Newton, 


4'2"X4'9"to 1'3", . 


2.911 


8 

f 


Private houses, 
Metropolitan Water Works 


7 


Quincy, . 


ll'3"X12'6"to24"pipe, . 


6.845 


u i 


blow-off, .... 


1 








Squantum schoolhouse, . 


1 


Waltham, 


3'6"X4'0", 


0.001 


1 


- - 


- 








.'I 


Factories, .... 


2 


Water town, . 


4'2"X4'9"to 12", . 


0.7505 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co., . 


1 








1 


Knights of Pythias building, 


1 


Needham, 6 


2'0"X2'3"to2'3"X2'6", . 


4.896 




- - 


— 


Wellesley, 7 




- 


- 




- 




49.545 


148 


46 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Water town. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 
6 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Water town. 

6 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

7 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the Metropolitan Sewerage districts appears in 
the following table: — 



106 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



Area 
(Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population. 


Miles of 

Local Sewer 

connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent). 


Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 


Miles). 


Public. 


Special. 


100.32 


659,530 


779.65 


595,570 


90.3 


318 


557 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



110.76 



510,100 



666.43 



407,410 



79.9 



148 



46 



Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 



211.08 



1,169,630 



1,446.08 



1,002,980 



85.8 



466 



603 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,169,630 on December 31, 
1919, 1,002,980, representing 85.8 per cent, were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,446.08 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan systems by 466 
public and 603 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 13.68 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan systems, and 3 public and 11 special connections have 
been added. 

CONSTRUCTION. 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Reading Extension. 

In the preliminary study of the Reading Extension of the North 
Metropolitan Sewerage System the Joint Board, to which the matter 
was referred by the Legislature of 1914, recommended that a tunnel 
should be built that would permit the town of Reading to discharge 
its sewage by gravity into the Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

This report was made to the Legislature of 1915 and the matter 
was referred to the Legislature of 1916. The latter authorized the 
construction of the work under Chapter 159 of the General Acts of 
1916 which carried an appropriation equal to the original estimate 
of cost. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board made effort to 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



107 



place the work under contract in the autumn of 1916 and publicly 
solicited bids for the construction of the tunnel, but none were 
received. Later the Board invited proposals from three responsible 
contractors of Boston. These bids were so high that it was evident 
that the work could not be built within the appropriation and the 
matter was brought to the attention of the Legislature of 1919. 
Additional legislation was passed whereby the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board was authorized to construct works for the 
disposal of the sewage of the town of Reading by pumping it into 
the Metropolitan sewers. The construction work has been carried 
on during the year in accordance with this plan. 

Section 76. — Reading Extension. 

The contract with Bruno & Petitti for the construction of about 
1,370 feet of 36-inch and 24-inch by 27-inch concrete sewer at the 
northerly end of Section 76 was mentioned in last year's report. 
Construction work was continued into this year and was completed 
May 24, 1919. From Station 29+00 to Station 36+00 the excava- 
tion was made in fine sand and considerable difficulty was encoun- 
tered because of the large amount of ground water. 



Section 73. — Reading Extension. 

This section extends from a point in Hill Street, Woburn, through 
private lands, entering the town of Stoneham and crossing the 
Stoneham branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad, other private 
lands, extending into and along Montvale Avenue, then through 
private land and crossing Lindenwood Road, then extending into 
private land, a total length of 3,600 feet. A contract for the building 
of this section was entered into by the Board, some particulars of 
which are as follows: — 



Date of contract No. 146, 

Name of contractor, 

Length of section, . 

Average depth of sewer trench, 

Dimensions of pipe sewer, 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, 



June 18, 1919. 

Rendle-Stoddard Company. 

3,600 feet. 

7 feet. 

15-inch and 18-inch. 

Ralph W. Loud. 



In passing through land of the Boston & Maine Railroad the sewer 
was built in tunnel. No difficulties were encountered, and work was 
completed on this section October 18, 1919. 



108 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Section 74. — Reading Extension. 

This section extends from a point in land of Oriana Brown north- 
erly mostly through private lands, crossing Lindenwood Road, Wil- 
liams Street and Oak Street to a point in land owned jointly by 
Charles A. Owen and George E. Merrifleld, a total distance of 3,165 
feet. A contract for the construction of this section was entered into 
by the Board, some particulars of which are as follows: — 



Date of contract No. 148, 

Name of contractor, 

Length of section, 

Average depth of excavation, 

Dimensions of pipe sewer, 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction work, 



September 17, 1919. 

Rendle-Stoddard Company. 

3,165 feet. 

7 feet. 

15-inch, 18-inch and 20-inch. 

Ralph W. Loud. 



Fine wet sands were found from Station 19+00 to Station 26+00. 
No serious difficulties have been encountered. At the close of the 
year there had been constructed 2,600 feet of sewer on this section. 

The pipe for these sections, which was furnished by the Board, 
consists of double-strength section Akron pipe. 

Studies for a pumping station, to be located in Reading near the 
intersection of Summer Avenue and Elm Street, have been made, 
and plans and specifications for receiving reservoir, pump well and 
building foundations will be ready early in January, 1920. 

It is expected that the extension will be ready for use during the 
coming year. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Wellesley Extension. 

The Wellesley Extension of the High-level sewer comprises Sections 
98 to 106 inclusive. Of these sections, 98, 102, 103, 104, 105 and 106 
are wholly completed and Section 99 is over one-half completed. 

Contracts have been entered into by the Board for the completion 
of the balance of Section 99 and for Section 101. Section 100 has 
not yet been placed under contract. 



Section 99 (Rock Tunnel). — Wellesley Extension. 

The contract for this work was described in last year's report. 
In the construction of the sewer a brick arch was substituted for 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



109 



the concrete arch in the tunnel. This change was requested by 
the contractor and was allowed by the Board as it reduced the cost.- 

Section 99 (Tjrench and River Crossing) . — Station 17 + 50 
to Station 33+00. — Wellesi.ey Extension. 
This part of Section 99 extends from a point in Jenney Lane in 
Dedham through private lands and across the Charles River, a dis- 
tance of 1,550 feet. A contract for the completion of this portion of 
the section was entered into by the Board, some particulars of 
which are as follows : — 



Date of contract No. 149, 
Name of contractor, 
Length of section, . 
Average depth of cut in trench, 
Dimensions of concrete sewer, 
Assistant Engineer in charge of construction 
work, Arthur F. F. Haskell. 



September 29, 1919. 

John P. Cavanagh Company. 

1,550 feet. 

12 feet. 

33-inch by 36-inch. 



Work was begun on this section October 2, 1919. At the end of 
the year about 50 feet of trench had been excavated and 10 feet of 
concrete sewer had been built. The material excavated thus far is 
boulder-clay and gravel. No serious difficulties have been encoun- 
tered. A small amount of ground water has been found. 



Section 101. — Wellesley Extension. 

This section extends from Common Street in Dedham along the 
southerly side of Charles River through private lands and crosses 
Dedham Avenue, private land and Charles River to a point in the 
town of Needham. The total length is 3,840 feet. A contract for 
the construction of this section was entered into by the Board, some 
particulars of which are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. 145, September 17, 1919. 

Name of contractor, Rendle-Stoddard Company. 

Length of section, 3,840 feet. 

Average depth of sewer in trench, .... 8 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, .... 33-inch by 36-inch. 
Dimensions of cast-iron siphon (2 lines under 

Charles River), 16 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, . Arthur F. F. Haskell. 



110 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

By permission of the Board the contractor was allowed to com- 
plete other work for the Board before starting on this section. This 
was done because of the scarcity of labor. No sewer has been con- 
structed to date on this section. 

MAINTENANCE. 
SCOPE OP WORK AND FORCE EMPLOYED. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house 
and 114.920 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge 
from 1,446.08 miles of town and city sewers at 466 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in 
the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force at present includes 153 men, of 
whom 92 are employed on the North System and 61 on the South 
System. These are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan Sys- 
tem, 58 engineers and other employees in the pumping stations and 
34 men, including foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, 
buildings and grounds; South Metropolitan System, 36 engineers 
and other employees in the pumping stations and 25 men, including 
foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections 
with the Metropolitan sewers, and the care of pumping stations and 
other buildings and grounds. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
the maintenance employees of this department as follows: — 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

The coal run at this station which extends from the end of the 
wharf to the coal bins was constructed in 1895. During the year 
considerable repair work has been necessary on this structure. 

The pumping station, dwelling house and locker buildings on the 
Island were repainted outside. The interior of the pumping station 
was cleaned and repainted throughout. 

Repairs were made on the salt water well for injection water lo- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 

cated on the beach. These consisted of the raising of the wall of 
the structure about 2 feet by means of a cast-iron ring having a 
diameter of 84 inches with a thickness of 2 inches and the construc- 
tion of a new cover. 

A Holly System for the return to the boilers of condensation was 
installed at this station thereby doing away with the pump unit 
which had been used for this purpose. 

East Boston Pumping Station. 

The lower bearing of the 12-inch shaft of pump No. 4 which for- 
merly consisted of lignum-vitse bearing surfaces was removed, and a 
new bearing designed with babbitted brass bearing surfaces was 
installed in its place. 

A Holly System for the return to the boilers of condensation was 
installed at this station thereby doing away with the pump unit 
which had been used for this purpose. 

The diaphragm located in the manhole of the siphon near this 
station was repaired. This formerly was supported by iron cables 
which have been replaced by f-inch galvanized iron chains. 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 
The interior of this station was cleaned and repainted throughout. 
A Whitlock feed- water heater was installed at this station. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 
Additional granolithic was laid in the yard of this station. 
The interior of the pumping station was cleaned and repainted 
throughout. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 

On September 3, 1919, during a heavy storm period, the babbitt 
metal in one of the main boxes of engine No. 1 at this station par- 
tially melted, thereby disabling the engine. Repairs were completed 
and the engine was put into service on September 6, 1919. 

A hoisting apparatus with an orange peel bucket having a capacity 
of 2 cubic feet was installed in the screen-house at this station for 
the purpose of removing the sand from the suction channel. This 
work had formerly been done by hand. 



112 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Nut Island Screen-house. 

The wharf and bridge at this station were refloored. A new coal 
pocket was constructed on the wharf with a capacity of 400 tons. 
This work was done with second-hand lumber which had been used 
on construction work. 

Government Use of Old 24-inch Quincy Force Main. 

The sewerage connection of the shipbuilding plant at Squantum, 
Quincy, with the 24-inch cast-iron force main in Squantum Street, 
has been in use during the year. The average discharge through the 
force main has been at the rate of about 125,000 gallons per 24 
hours. This sewage is discharged through the Boston Main Drain- 
age outfall works at Moon Island. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers. 

The efforts to improve the condition of the Metropolitan sewers 
in regard to dangers resulting from the introduction of gasolene into 
the same have been successfully continued throughout the year. 

An inspector has been employed in this department whose duty it 
is to visit existing garages and see that the separators are kept in 
proper condition, also to enforce the regulation concerning the in- 
stallation of such separators at all newly constructed garages. 

During the year 109 new garages and other establishments using 
gasolene have been connected with the local sewer systems which 
discharge into the Metropolitan sewers. While the presence of 
gasolene in the Metropolitan sewers is noted occasionally, the condi- 
tion has been greatly improved. 

The following tables show the particulars in regard to establish- 
ments known to be using gasolene and which are connected with 
the public sewerage systems of the different municipalities in the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Districts: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



113 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used connected with Public 
Sewers and Progress of Work of installing Separators to December 31, 1919. 



City or Town. 


Number of 

Places 

connected 

with Sewer. 


Number of 

Places 
originally 

having 
Acceptable 
Separators. 


Number of 

Places 

where 

Changes 

have been 
made. 


Number of 
New- 
Garages 
built, 1919. 




6 


- 


3 


- 




4 


- 


3 


- 


Boston: — 










Charlestown District, .... 


25 


- 


19 


3 


East Boston District, .... 


26 


- 


17 


4 


Cambridge, 1 


109 


- 


94 


14 




24 


- 


18 


2 




16 


- 


14 


1 


Lexington, ...... 


1 


- 


- 


1 




23 


- 


20 


2 


Medford, . . . . 


16 


- 


13 


2 




7 


- 


5 


2 


Revere, ■ . 


12 


- 


3 


3 


Somerville, 


52 


8 


32 ' 


11 




6 


- 


6 


- 


Wakefield, 


6 


- 


"6 


- 


Winchester, 


14 


- 


14 


- 




4 


- 


4 


- 




3 


- 


3 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals 


354 


8 


274 


45 



1 Storer's garage; no separator. 



2 Not yet connected with Metropolitan sewer. 



114 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used connected with Public 
Sewers and Progress of Work of installing Separators to December 31, 1919. 



City or Town. 


Number of 

Places 

connected 

with Sewer. 


Number of 

Places 
originally 

having 
Acceptable 
Separators. 


Number of 

Places 

where 

Changes 

have been 
made. 


Number of 

New 

Garages 

built, 1919. 


Boston: — 










Hyde Park District, 






15 


- 


8 


1 


West Roxbury District, 






31 


10 


16 


5 


Back Bay District, 






59 


22 


26 


11 


Brighton District, . 








61 


22 


28 


11 


Dorchester District, 








41 


20 


11 


10 


Brookline, 








77 


9 


54 


14 


Dedham, . 












3 


3 


- 


- 


Milton, 












1 


1 


- 


- 


Newton, . 












46 


18 


23 


5 


Quincy, 












17 


- 


15 


2 


Waltham, . 












10 


5 


1 


4 


Watertown, 












17 


3 


13 


1 


Wellesley, 1 












- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


378 


113 


195 


64 



Not yet connected with Metropolitan sewer. 



Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Win- 
chester, WOBURN AND STONEHAM. 

Four men and a foreman have been employed during a part of the 
year flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewers through the 
tannery districts in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very greatly 
reduced the amount of sludge materipl entering the Metropolitan 
sewers. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge 
collected and removed : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



115 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gelatine 
and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham, Year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1919. 



Location of Basin. 


Basin in Oper- 
ation. 


Inside 
Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 

(Feet). 


a> 
G 
03 
<o 

13 

Ui 
0) 

Hi 
•si* 

U M 

is 

3-d 


Average Quantity Semi- 
fluid Sludge removed 
during Year (Cubic 
Yards). 


Total Quantity Semi-fluid 
Sludge removed during 
Year (Cubic Yards). 


Beggs & Cobb Company, rotary screen 


Dec. 


12, 1917 


- 




-2 


- 


12.44 


process. 1 
Beggs & Cobb Company, wooden settling 

basin. 
Beggs & Cobb Company, outlet intercept- 


Aug. 
July 


12, 1919 
16, 1919 


6.0 X 4.0 
12.0 X 8.0 




20 
5 


11.00 


304.44 
55.00 


ing sump. 
American Hide and Leather Company, 

Factory D. 
Dorington Leather Company, . 


Nov. 


15, 1910 


48.0 X 23.1 




6 


139.50 


837.00 


Dec. 


10, 1910 


47.2 X 23.0 




5M 


106.84 


587.62 


E. Cummings Leather Company, 






Nov. 


1, 1910 


45.9 X 22.6 




2 


97.60 


195.20 


W. P. Fox & Sons, 






July 


12, 1910 


47.8 X 22.6 




10 


270.40 


2,740.00 


Thayer & Foss, 






Sept. 


15, 1910 


48.1 X23.1 




4H 


209.80 


944.10 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 3 






May 


1, 1911 


10.2 X 14.5 




- 


- 


- 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 






May 


1, 1911 


43.8 X 19.5 




3 


102.00 


306.00 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 






Dec. 


26, 1919 


6.0 X 4.0 




- 


- 


- 


American Glue Company, 






Oct. 


1, 1910 


47.1 X23.0 




3 


136.36 


409.08 


J. 0. Whitten Company, . 






■ 


L902 


35.5X24.7 




23 


58.74 


1,351.02 


J. 0. Whitten Company, . 








L902 


67.2 X 12.0 




23 


8.50 


195.50 


Morris Kaplan, 3 . 






Jan. 


9, 1911 


46.8 X 22.9 




- 


- 


- 


Morris Kaplan, 






Jan. 


9, 1911 


.4.0 X 4.0 




50 


1.00 


50.00 


S. C. Parker & Son, s . 






Aug. 


1, 1910 


48.3 X 23.0 




- 


- 


- 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 3 » 4 




Jan. 


15, 1910 


47.0 X 23.0 




- 


- 


- 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 3 >* 




May 


9, 1910 


47.0 X 23.0 




- 


- 


- 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 3 > 4 




Oct. 


19, 1911 


51.0 X 25.0 




- 


- 


- 


Total 




- 


- 


- 


- 


7,987.40 



1 By permission of the Board, dated July 25, 1917, effluent formerly passing through three settling basins 
has been conducted through " Riensch-Wurl " screens and is allowed to enter the Metropolitan sewer by 
a special 15-inch branch. 

Permission was granted with the provision that all existing connections and settling basins shall be 
left intact and ready for use if necessary. 

2 Daily, continuous. 

3 Not used 1919. 

4 Basins filled up temporarily. 



116 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 





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118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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29.9 


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Ratio of 

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Population 

to Present 

Total 
Population. 


Per Cent. 
90.3 

79.9 


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Area 
ultimately 

to 

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Sewage. 


Sq. Miles. 
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110.76 


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now con- 
tributing 
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Sq. Miles. 
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33.13 


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Present 
Total 
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tion. 


659,530 
510,100 


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now con- 
tributing 
Sewage. 


595,570 
407,410 


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Number of 

Persons 

served by 
Each House 
Connection. 


6.95 
8.70 


HO 
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Number 
of Con- 
nections 
with Local 
Sewers. 


85,705 
46,928 


CO 
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Separate and combined, 
Separate and combined, 


1 

1 


Miles 
of Local 
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con- 
nected. 


779.65 
666.43 


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North Metropolitan, 
South Metropolitan, 


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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



119 



PUMPING STATIONS. 

Capacities and Results. 
The following table shows the comparison of the growth in the 
amount of sewage handled and the total cost of the operation of the 
different stations in 1919 with the same items of 1918 and of 1914 
when prices had not been affected by the war : — 



Pumping Station. 


Sewage pumped in 1919 
increased over that of — 


Cost op Operation in 1919 
increased over that op — 


1918. 


1914. 


1918. 


1914. 


Deer Island, 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook, 

Quincy, . . ^ . . 
Ward Street, . . ' 


Per Cent. 
6 

6 

3 

30 
35 
19 


Per Cent. 
20 

20 

18 

40 

43 

27 


Per Cent. 
10 

4 

10 

5 

7 
6i 


Per Cent. 
63 

53 

39 

44 

54 

46 



1 Decrease. 



Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Sewerage Pumping Stations and at the Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting 
Station during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the 
Previous Year. 



Pumping Station. 



Deer Island, 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook, 

Quincy, 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting sta- 
tion. 



Average Daily Pumpage. 



Jan. 1, 1919, to 
Dec. 31, 1919. 



Gallons. 
70,300,000 

68,300,000 

38,400,000 

4,888,000 

5,693,000 

33,759,000 

205,500 



Jan. 1, 1918, to 
Dec. 31, 1918. 



Gallons. 
66,500,000 

64,500,000 

37,300,000 

3,767,000 

4,218,000 

28,395,000 

173,128 



Increase during the 
Year. 



Gallons. 
3,800,000 

3,800,000 

1,100,000 

1,121,000 

1,475,000 

5,364,000 

32,372 



Per Cent. 
5.7 

5.9 

2.9 
29.8 
35.0 
18.9 
18.7 



120 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



North Metropolitan System. 
Deer Island Pumping Station. 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 59,100,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 70,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 3 screenmen, 

1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used : bituminous, costing from $8.50 to $8.52 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1919 

January, . 




2,321,700,000 


74,900,000 


51,100,000 


128,800,000 


11.61 


64,700,000 


February, 






2,009,900,000 


71,800,000 


55,500,000 


119,100,000 


11.20 


60,300,000 


March, 






2,706,900,000 


87,300,000 


74,000,000 


119,800,000 


11.83 


64,400,000 


April, 






2,169,900,000 


72,300,000 


58,000,000 


132,700,000 


11.56 


64,700,000 


May, 






2,413,000,000 


77,800,000 


59,800,000 


110,800,000 


11.62 


61,300,000 


June, 






1,788,700,000 


59,600,000 


51,700,000 


75,300,000 


10.67 


53,500,000 


July, 






1,697,700,000 


54,800,000 


38,500,000 


87,100,000 


10.90 


54,500,000 


August, . 






1,755,400,000 


56,600,000 


41,600,000 


102,100,000 


10.91 


54,300,000 


September, 






2,355,000,000 


78,500,000 


47,100,000 


132,400,000 


11.48 


63,100,000 


October, . 






1,856,200,000 


59,900,000 


47,300,000 


78,000,000 


10.81 


56,100,000 


November, 






2,314,200,000 


77,100,000 


49,800,000 


147,100,000 


9.99 


52,100,000 


December, 






2,243,100,000 


72,400,000 


54,900,000 


85,200,000 


9.03 


60,200,000 


Total, 


25,631,700,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


70,300,000 


52,400,000 


109,900,000 


10.97 


59,100,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (25,631.7 Million Gallons) X Lift (10.97 Feet) = 281,179.7 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, . . . . ' . 

Oil 

Waste, ...... 

Water 

Packing, . . . . 
Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$21,717 79 

25,294 12 

675 84 

95 17 

1,333 20 

300 71 

1,051 20 



$50,468 03 
$4,006 31 



$0.07724 
0.08996 
0.00240 
0.00034 
0.00474 
0.00107 
0.00374 



, 17949 



East Boston Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, w T ith 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 71,600,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 68,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 3 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 4 

oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: bituminous costing from $7.75 to $8.70 per gross ton. 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1919 

January, . 




2,259,700,000 


72,900,000 


49,100,000 


126,800,000 


14.68 


63,900,000 


February, 






1,953,900,000 


69,800,000 


53,500,000 


117,100,000 


14.88 


76,400,000 


March, 






2,644,900,000 


85,300,000 


72,000,000 


117,800,000 


14.49 


74,500,000 


April, 






2,109,900,000 


70,300,000 


56,000,000 


130,700,000 


15.07 


69,600,000 


May, 






2,351,000,000 


75,800,000 


57,800,000 


108,800,000 


14.76 


72,700,000 


June, 






1,728,700,000 


57,600,000 


49,700,000 


73,300,000 


14.66 


62,600,000 


July, 






1,635,700,000 


52,800,000 


36,500,000 


85,100,000 


14.66 


63,700,000 


August, . 






1,693,400,000 


54,600,000 


39,600,000 


100,100,000 


14.82 


75,200,000 


September, 






2,295,000,000 


76,500,000 


45,100,000 


130,400,000 


14.69 


74,600,000 


October, . 






1,794,200,000 


57,900,000 


45,300,000 


76,000,000 


15.35 


77,200,000 


November, 


« 




2,254,200,000 


75,100,000 


47,800,000 


145,100,000 


14.22 


73,400,000 


December, 






2,181,100,000 


70,400,000 


52,900,000 


83,200,000 


12.19 


75,700,000 


Total, 


24,901,700,000 


- 




- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






- 


68,300,000 


50,400,000 


107,900,000 


14.54 


71,600,000 
\ 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (24,901.7 Million Gallons) X Lift (14.54 Feet) = 362,070.7 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 


$27,065 55 


$0.07475 


Coal, 


















25,798 20 


0.07126 


Oil, . 


















1,049 76 


0.00290 


Waste, 


















101 05 


0.00028 


Water, 


















1,780 68- 


0.00492 


Packing, . 


. 
















152 44 


0.00042 


Miscellaneous suppl 


es and renewals, 
















3,595 27 


0.00993 


Totals, 


$59,542 95 


$0.16446 


Labor at screens, 


















$1,946 67 


- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 48,500,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 38,400,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen 

and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing from $8.25 to $9.20 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1919 

January, . 




1,338,200,000 


43,200,000 


30,700,000 


69,300,000 


7.98 


48,600,000 


February, 






1,114,600,000 


39,800,000 


31,900,000 


68,100,000 


8.32 


58,500,000 


March, 






1,417,000,000 


45,700,000 


34,600,000 


65,600,000 


8.07 


59,700,000 


April, 






1,117,100,000 


37,200,000 


30,100,000 


63,500,000 


7.51 


48,000,000 


May, 






1,256,500,000 


40,500,000 


30,500,000 


63,800,000 


7.44 


48,200,000 


June, 






1,011,400,000 


33,700,000 


29,100,000 


44,700,000 


7.21 


41,800,000 


July, 






1,115,200,000 


36,000,000 


26,400,000 


61,600,000 


7.83 


49,700,000 


August, . 






1,102,500,000 


35,600,000 


27,400,000 


58,800,000 


7.53 


45,000,000 


September, 






1,184,500,000 


39,500,000 


25,700,000 


69,300,000 


7.27 


43,700,000 


October, . 






963,300,000 


31,100,000 


22,700,000 


44,800,000 


7.89 


43,300,000 


November, 






1,151,400,000 


38,400,000 


24,400,000 


68,500,000 


6.44 


46,500,000 


December, 






1,258,200,000 


40,600,000 


29,600,000 


56,900,000 


7.03 


49,500,000 


Total, 


14,029,900,000 


- 


- 




- 


- 


Average, 






- 


38,400,000 


28,600,000 


61,200,000 


7.54 


48,500,000 



124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (14,029.9 Million Gallons) X Lift (7.54 Feet) = 105,785.4 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil, . 

Waste, 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$18,660 57 

10,068 20 

301 36 

75 18 

631 35 

25 60 

961 38 




$0.17640 
0.09517 
0.00285 
0.00071 
0.00597 
0.00024 
0.00909 



$0.29043 



Aletvife Brook Pumping Station. 

The plant at this station consists of tw r o 9-inch Andrews com- 
mercial centrifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to 
compound marine engines, together with a pump and engine added 
later. The latter consists of a specially designed engine of the ver- 
tical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a centrif- 
ugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 18,300,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 4,888,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: bituminous, costing from $7.78 to $11.46 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1919 

January, . 




160,838,000 


5,188,000 


4,143,000 


8,583,000 


13.11 


17,600,000 


February, 






133,749,000 


4,777,000 


3,669,000 


7,462,000 


13.08 


18,200,000 


March, 






206,482,000 


6,661,000 


5,300,000 


8,701,000 


13.12 


21,800,000 


April, 






174,077,000 


5,803,000 


4,799,000 


8,229,000 


1311 


19,700,000 


May, 






162,056,000 


5,228,000 


4,201,000 


7,226,000 


12.84 


18,700,000 


June, 






116,427,000 


3,881,000 


2,928,000 


4,677,000 


12.99 


17,000,000 


July, 






107,722,000 


3,475,000 


2,833,000 


6,206,000 


12.90 


16,700,000 


August, . 






105,593,000 


3,406,000 


2,833,000 


5,494,000 


12.97 


15,800,000 


September, 






172,726,000 


5,758,000 


3,430,000 


9,232,000 


13.13 


21,600,000 


October, . 






114,518,000 


3,694,000 


3,028,000 


4,860,000 


13.00 


15,000,000 


November, 






158,079,000 


5,203,000 


3,862,000 


7,462,000* 


13.08 


18,300,000 


December, 






173,169,000 


5,586,000 


4,201,000 


6,931,000 


13.14 


19,000,000 


Total, 


1,783,436,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


4,888,000 


3,769,000 


7,089,000 


13.04 


18,300,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,783.436 Million Gallons) X Lift (13.04 Feet) = 23,256.01 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, ■ 

Coal, 

Oil, 

Waste, . . . 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



$7,051 00 
4,248 66 
329 49 
134 36 
299 04 
83 52 
366 29 



$12,512 36 
$3,771 43 



S0.30319 
0.18269 
0.01417 
0.00578 
0.01286 
0.00359 
0.01575 



$0.53803 



126 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the plung- 
ers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 79,459,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 33,759,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 5 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing from $7.59 to $9.52 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year: 1,582.1 cubic yards. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1919 

January, . 




1,074,055,000 


34,646,000 


27,665,000 


48,372,000 


40.48 


78,350,000 


February, 






829,106,000 


29,610,000 


27,341,000 


46,892,000 


40.69 


72,600,000 


March, 






1,223,136,000 


39,455,000 


34,162,000 


45,122,000 


41.46 


92,519,000 


April, 






1,126,616,000 


37,554,000 


33,995,000 


49,120,000 


42.77 


91,583,000 


May, 






1,148,405,000 


37,045,000 


31,886,000 


44,782,000 


42.14 


86,443,000 


June, 






884,241,000 


29,474,000 


23,828,000 


36,824,000 


42.36 


73,723,000 


July, 






854,269,000 


27,557,000 


22,122,000 


42,743,000 


42.40 


75,316,000 


August, . 






845,944,000 


27,290,000 


22,664,000 


38,080,000 


42.23 


75,064,000 


September, 






1,179,787,000 


39,326,000 


25,498,000 


51,217,000 


41.62 


78,222,000 


October, . 






929,388,000 


29,980,000 


26,975,000 


33,807,000 


42.23 


67,556,000 


November, 






1,099,108,000 


36,637,000 


27,337,000 


46,486,000 


40.20 


76,134,000 


December, 






1,132,496,000 


36,532,000 


30,777,000 


42,885,000 


4027 


85,995,000 


Total, 


12,326,551,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


33,759,000 


27,854,000 


43,861,000 


41.57 


79,459,000 



Records from plunger displacements. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (12,326.551 Million Gallons) X Lift (41.57 Feet) = 512,414.73 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 










822,803 10 


SO. 04450 


Coal, . : 


















16,821 64 


0.03283 


Oil, . 


* 
















487 43 


0.00095 


Waste, 


















60 81 


0.00012 


Water, 


















1,580 48 


0.00308 


Packing, . 


















- 


- 


Miscellaneous suppl 


es and renewals, 
















5,563 21 


0.01086 


Totals, 


$47,316 67 


$0.09234 


Labor at screens, 


















$6,078 88 


- 



Quincy Pumping Station. 
At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 



Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 gal- 
lons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 35,100,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 5,693,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used : bituminous, costing $8.35 per gross ton. 

Material intercepted at screen during the year: 329 cubic yards. 



12S 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty fft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1919. 














January, . 






178,806,000 


5,768,000 


4,541,000 


7,984,000 


27.00 


33,900,000 


February, 






137,540,000 


4,912,000 


3,788,000 


• 6,829,000 


25.17 


31,000,000 


March, 






218,656,000. 


7,053,000 


4,993,000 


11,110,000 


3109 


38,200,000 


April, 






183,192,000 


6,106,000 


5,288,000 


7,610,000 


30.32 


37,600,000 


May, 






174,014,000 


5,613,000 


4,946,000 


6,505,000 


27.44 


35,000,000 


June, 






145,781,000 


4,859,000 


4,181,000 


6,113,000 


2366 


37,100,000 


July, 






136,742,000 


4,411,000 


3,719,000 


6,280,000 


21.60 


30,000,000 


August, . 






141,122,000 


4,552,000 


3,780,000 


6,300,000 


21.93 


33,500,000 


September, 






233,608,000 


7,787,000 


4,772,000 


11,910,000 


27.50 


39,400,000 


October, . 






169,251,000 


5,460,000 


5,087,000 


7,250,000 


23.98 


37,600,000 


November, 






176,913,000 


5,897,000 


4,789,000 


7,308,000 


27.42 


34,000,000 


December, 






182,829,000 


5,898,000 


4,722,000 


7,262,000 


29.58 


33,800,000 


Total, 


2,078,454,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






• 


5,693,000 


4,551,000 


7,705,000 


26.39 


35,100,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (2,078.454 Million Gallons) X Lift (26.39 Feet) = 54,850.4 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 


$6,743 84 


$0.12295 


Coal, 














4,884 75 


0.08906 


Oil, 














115 80 


0.00211 


Waste 














53 44 


0.00097 


Water, 














366 91 


0.00669 


Packing, 














74 63 


0.00136 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 














1,139 09 


0.02077 


Totals, 


$13,378 46 


$0.24391 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 










$3,632 77 


- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 129 



Nut Island Screen-house. 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted atjthe 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage 
lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 65,100,000 gallons. 
Total material intercepted at screens: 1,115.1 cubic yards. 
Material intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged: 1.27 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screemnen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing S8.60 per gross ton. 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct- 
current motors. 

• The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not 
materially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. 
The effluent is largely ground water. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: about 1,500,000 gallons each, with 20-foot lift. 
Average daily amount pumped: 205,500 gallons. 
Average lift: 15.35 feet. 



130 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Pumping Stations during the Year. 



Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., 
Frederick A. Potts & Co., 
Clitter Coal Co., . 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., 
E. Russell Norton, 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., 
Gorman-Leonard Coal Co., 
William A. Jepson Corp 
Locke Coal Co., 
Locke Coal Co., 
Geo. E. Warren Co., 
Geo. E. Warren Co., 
Riverside Coal Co., 
Geo. E. Warren Co., 
Geo. E. Warren Co., 
Geo. E. Warren Co., 
Maritime Coaling Co., 
J. A. Whittemore's Sons Co., 

Total bituminous, 

Average cost, . 



Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 



3 

Ph 

T3 
3 . 

ci g 

*02 o 
I— I ^ 

*■> i? 







1,455 
656 



2,111 

S8 51 



Ah 



p 

Ph 

a 

£ . 

x O 

Tl cs 

D 



515 

1,793 

385 

300 



2,993 
$8 21 



900 
340 



1,240 
$8 51 



8 a 
8.S 

mts. 

Id 

3"" 



69 
50 
49 
48 
37 
53 
45 
46 
124 
14 
76 



611 
3 76 



bfl 

s 
'a 

S 

3 



is ci 



T3 cS 
c3M 



276 
237 
729 
48 
538 



376 



2,204 

$7 95 



3 

Ph 
>> . 

c o 



351 



351 
3 35 



-3 

i 

e3 



3 
+= O 
3^3 



348 



348 
I 60 



O 



rH 



$8 50 
8 52 

7 75 

8 25 
8 28 
8 70 

8 25 

9 20 
7 78 
7 96 

7 99 

8 19 
8 30 
8 59 
8 64 
8 71 
8 80 

10 08 

11 46 
7 60 
7 59 
7 62 
7 64 

7 70 

8 35 

8 60 

9 52 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 131 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The Metropolitan Sewerage districts now have outfalls in Boston 
Harbor at five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the 
North District and three from the South District. These outfalls 
are all in good condition. 

During the year the sewage of the North District has been dis- 
charged wholly through the outlet located near Deer Island light. 
The other outfall of this system is closed by a cast-iron cover which 
can be easily removed. 

Of the outfalls of the South District, two extend for a distance 
exceeding one mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the 
third one, called an emergency outlet, extends about 1,500 feet from 
the same. In the first four months of this year discharge was made 
jointly through the two regular outfalls. During the balance of the 
year discharge was made from the easterly line alone. The emer- 
gency outfall was not opened during the year except for an occasional 
flushing. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan 
District outfall at Deer Island has been 70,300,000 gallons of sewage 
per 24 hours, with a maximum rate of 153,200,000 gallons during a 
stormy period in November, 1919. The amount of sewage dis- 
charged in the North Metropolitan District averaged 118 gallons per 
day for each person, taking the estimated population of the District 
contributing sewage. If the sewers in this District were restricted 
to the admission of sewage proper only, this per capita amount 
would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 65,100,000 gal- 
lons of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut 
Island screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into 
the outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day, which 
occurred during a heavy storm on September 4, 1919, was 144,500,000 
gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed by the South Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, which was at the rate of 160 gallons per day per person of the 
estimated number contributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in 
the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan 



132 METROPOLITAN WATER, ETC., BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 

District, because, owing to the large size and unused capacity of the 
South District High-level Sewer, more storm water is at present 
admitted to the sewers of this District. 

Material intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating 
materials, has during the year amounted to 1,715.9 cubic yards. 
This is equivalent to 1.807 cubic feet for each million gallons of 
sewage pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage stations has amounted to 3,026.2 cubic yards, equal 
to 3.44 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the 
outfall works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons 
indicate that they are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Director and Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 1, 1920. 



APPENDIX 



134 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 1 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



391i 



392i 



393 



3941 



395' 



396i 



39-M 



2. 

WORK. 



Furnishing water valves: 2 
12-inch, 3 l6-inch and 2 36- 
inch screw lift valves. 

Furnishing cast-iron frames 
and covers; about 18,000 
pounds. 

Furnishing 820 tons cast-iron 
water pipe: 90 tons 12-inch, 
400 tons 16-inch and 330 tons 
36-inch pipe and 25 tons 
special castings. (Contract 
also included 90 tons 16-inch 
pipe for Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Works). 

Laying 12-inch water pipes in 
Boston. 



Laying 16-inch water pipes in 
Arlington. 



Laying 36-inch water pipes in 
Chelsea. 



Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Sudbury Dam in Southbor- 
ough. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



11 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



5. 

Lowest. 



,050 00 $5,710 00 2 



711 00 



37,555 00' 



4,032 50 



16,450 50 



8,059 00 



625 50 2 



37,475 00 



3,600 00 2 



14,035 00 



7,075 00 2 



6. 

Contractor. 



Chapman Valve Mfg. 
Co., Indian Orchard, 
Mass. 

Gibby Foundry Co., 
East Boston. 



Warren Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Phillips- 
burg, N. J. 



Vincenzo Grande, Bos- 
ton. 



James Barletta, West 
Roxbury, Mass. 



Coleman Brothers, 
Chelsea, Mass. 



Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Co. of Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



135 



Appendix No . 1 . 



the Yeae 1919 — Water Works. 

1919 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



. 10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 



May 12, 1919 



May 2, 1919 



June 10, 1919 



Oct. 15, 1919 



July 24, 1919 



Aug. 13, 1919 



Nov. 22, 1919 



Aug. 14, 1919 



Dec. 16, 1919 



Aug. 14, 1919 



Nov. 28, 1919 



Dec. 21, 1914 



Jan. 1, 1922 



For 12-inch valves, $410 each; for 16-inch valves, 
each and for 36-inch valves, $1,650 each. 



For castings, 3.475 cents per pound, . 



For 12-inch, 16-inch and 36-inch pipes, $42.75 per ton 
of 2,000 pounds and for special castings, $100 per ton 
of 2,000 pounds f. o. b. cars at foundry. 



For laying 20-inch cast-iron pipe, $1.45 per lin. ft.; 
for laying 4-inch cast-iron pipe for blow-offs and 
connections, $2 per lin. ft.; for rock excavation 
(above or below grade of bottom of trench), $7 per 
cu. yd. ; for earth excavation below grade of bottom 
of trench, $2 per cu. yd.; for chambers for 16-inch 
and smaller valves, $60 per chamber; for concrete 
masonry, $12 per cu. yd. 

For laying 16-inch cast-iron pipe, $1.65 per lin. ft.; 
for laying 4-inch cast-iron pipe for blow-offs and 
connections, $2 per lin. ft.; for rock excavation 
above and below grade of bottom of trench, $6 per 
cu. yd. ; for earth excavation below grade of bottom 
of trench, $1.50 per cu. yd. ; for chambers for 16-inch 
and smaller valves, $65 per chamber; for concrete 
masonry, $8 per cu. yd. 

For laying 36-inch cast-iron pipe, $3.60 per lin. ft.; 
for laying 12-inch cast-iron pipe for blow-offs and 
connections, $2 per lin. ft.; for rock excavation 
above grade of bottom of trench, $8 per cu. yd. ; for 
rock excavation below grade of bottom of trench, 
$10 per cu. yd. ; for earth excavation below grade of 
bottom of trench, $3 per cu. yd.; for chambers for 
36-inch valves, $150 per chamber; for chambers for 
16-inch and smaller valves, $90 per chamber; for 
concrete masonry, $15 per cu. yd. 

About 5,000,000 kilowatt hours of energy per year at 
$6.25 per thousand kilowatt hours. 



5,710 00 



655 70 



38,000 00 



3,248 93 



15,444 02 



8,755 07 



99,554 45 



5- 



3 Quantity increased as provided for in contract by orders in October and December for about 46 
tons 16-inch pipe. 

4 Contract based upon^bid of $6.25 per thousand kilowatt hours for entire output. Other bid for 
portion of output. 



136 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 



12 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract 



51-M 

62-Mi 
63-Mi 
64-M 



65-m; 



2. 

WORK. 



Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam in Clinton. 



3,000 tons anthracite screen- 
ings. 

6,000 tons bituminous coal, . 



8,000 tons bituminous coal, 



Iron fence for Mystic Reser- 
voir. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



4 
under 
W. W. 
Speci- 
fica- 
tions. 

3 
under 
Deal- 
ers' 
Speci- 
fica- 
tions. 



Amount op Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



53.251 per 
gr. ton. 



,197 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$5.30 per 

M 

kilowatt 

hours. 



53.09 2 per 
gr. ton. 



!,029 00 2 



6. 

Contractor. 



New England Power 
Co. and Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Co. 
of Boston. 

Dexter & Carpenter, 
Inc., Boston. 

E. Russell Norton, 
Boston. 

George E. Warren Co., 
Boston. 



Boston Structural Steel 
Co., Cambridge. 



1 Contract completed. 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



137 



the Yeae 1919 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completon 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 



Jan. 13, 1917 

May 13, 1918 

May 17, 1918 

May 7, 1919 



Jan. 1, 1929 



About 7,000,000 kilowatt hours of energy per year at 
§5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours. 



Mar. 24, 1919 



See previous report, 
See previous report, 



For bituminous coal, S3. 09 per ton of 2,240 pounds 
f. o. b. at mines. 



June 11, 1919 



Sept. 27, 1919 



For making and delivering iron fence complete, §2,029 , 



$39,614 77 

4,594 45 
19,696 85 
14,313 09 



9 

10 
11 



2,029 00 



12 



5 Contract terminated after the delivery of 2,421 gross tons. 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1919 — Water Works — 

Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts 1895 to 1919, inclusive. 1 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1919. 



Distribution Department, 6 contracts, 

396 contracts completed from 1896 to 1918, inclusive, 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 402 contracts, 



§71,813 72 
17,573,166 71 



$17,644,980 43 
512,000 00 



$17,132,980 43 



1 In this summary contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



139 






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140 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1919. 



Day of Month. 


>> 
u 

a 

•-3 


u 

03 
3 
U 


o 
a 


a 
< 


>> 


§ 

►-3 


1-5 


to 

< 


u 

OJ 

a 

a 

© 
w. 


a> 

O 
O 

o 


S 

£ 

© 
> 
o 


M 

e 

o 

V 

Q 


1, 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


2, 
3, 

4, 












3 
3 


- 


- 


- 


0.87 


" 


- 


- 


3 
3 


0.16 


1.49 


- 












1.842 


- 


- 


- 


0.06 


- 


- 


- 


3.70 


- 


3 


- 


5, 












- 


- 


3 


3 


0.37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1.262 


- 


6, 












- 


- 


0.16 


0.18 


- 


~ 


3 


3 


- 


0.22 


- 


0.351 


7, 












0.17i 


- 


- 


0.10 


- 


- 


2.23 


0.19 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


8, 












- 


- 


3 


0.15 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


9, 












- 


- 


1.002 


0.06 


- 


0.91 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


3 


10, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


0.66 


- 


3 


0.31 


- 


1.102 


11, 












- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1.87 


- 


3 


- 


12, 












- 


- 


- 


0.37 


3 


- 


- 


- 


0.06 


- 


3 


0.102 


13, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


1.36 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


0.86 


- 


14, 












- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.36 


- 


0.29 


- 


0.272 


15, 












- 


0.96 2 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


16, 












- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


0.33 


- 


0.27 


3 


- 


0.071 


17, 












- 


- 


3 


1.47 


0.71 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.42 


- 


- 


18, 












- 


- 


1.212 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19, 












- 


- 


0.61 


- 


- 


- 


1.54 


0.38 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


0.92 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, 












- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


22, 












- 


0.841 


- 


- 


2.73 


- 


3 


0.44 


3 


- 


0.09 


- 


23, 












3 


l.Oli 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.09 


- 


2.13 


- 


- 


- 


24, 












1.56 


- 


- 


3 


0.08 


- 


- 


3 


0.27 


- 


- 


0.091 


25, 












- 


3 


- 


0.17 


- 


- 


- 


1.66 


- 


- 


3 


- 


26, 












- 


1.00 


- 


- 


- 


3 


0.09 


- 


- 


0.10 


3 


- 


27, 












- 


- 


3 


- 


0.01 


1.57 


- 


0.11 


- 


3 


2.25 


- 


28, 












- 


0.68 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.63 


- 


- 


29, 












0.081 


- 


2.10 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.33 


- 


30, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


0.081 


31, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.50 


1.11 


- 


0.10 


- 


- 


1 


"'otah 


I. 


3.65 


4.49 


5.08 


2.50 


6.21 


3.40 


6.44 


4.25 


8.32 


2.30 


6.28 


2.06 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year, 34.98 inches. 
2 Rain and snow. 3 Rainfall included in that following. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1919. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

u 

03 

C 

1-5 


>> 

% 
u 

£i 
© 


u 


a 
< 


>> 


© 

»-5 


1-5 


-4J 

to 


© 

.a 

s 

© 

© 


© 

o 

+i 

O 


© 

B 

o 
> 
o 


© 

^2 

a 

© 
© 

« 


1, . . . . . 


3 


- 


0.58 


- 


3 


- 


- 


0.12 


3 


- 


3 


- 


2, 












3 


- 


. - 


0.01 1 


0.61 


" 


- 


- 


3 


0.13 


1.31 


- 


3, 












3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.31 


3 


- 


- 


4, 












1.622 


0.02 


- 


0.03 


- 


" 


- 


- 


- ■ 


0.02 


3 


- 


5, 












- 


- 


3 


3 


0.15 


~ 


- 


- 


■ - 


3 


3 


- 


6, 












- 


- 


0.11 


0.08 


- 


0.03 


0.45 


3 


- 


0.21 


1.40 


- 


7, 












- 


- 


- 


0.17 


0.01 


3 


0.03 


0.45 


- 


- 


- 


0.301 


8, 












0.07 2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


0.01 


3 


- 


- 


- 


9, 












- 


- 


1.30 


0.16 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


10, 












- 


- 


- 


0.04 


3 


- 


0.29 


- 


1.22 


0.19 


- 


0.99 


11, 












- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


0.14 


0.06 


3 


- 


12, 












- 


- - 


- 


0.50 


2.19 


- 


- 


- 


0.40 


- 


3 


- 


13, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


0.46 


- 


14, 












- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.74 


- 


3 


- 


0.43 2 


15, 












- 


0.982 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


0.16 


0.42 


- 


- 


16, 












- 


- 


3 


0.07 


- 


- 


0.49 


- 


0.13 


3 


- 


- 


17, 












- 


- 


3 


1.67 


0.43 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


0.36 


- 


0.05 1 


18, 












- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19, 












- 


- 


1.71 2 


- 


- 


- 


1.13 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20, 












- 


- 


- 


0.03 


3 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, 












- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


0.01 


0.04 


- 


- 


22, 












3 


0.40i 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


0.03 


- 


23, 












3 


1.172 


- 


- 


1.18 


- 


1.90 


- 


0.69 


- 


- 


-- 


24, 












1.73 


- 


- 


0.14 


3 


- 


- 


3 


0.28 


- 


- 


0.112 


25, 












- 


3 


- 


- 


0.35 


- 


- 


1.58 


- 


- 


3 


- 


26, 












- 


0.78 


- 


- 


- 


3 


0.07 


- 


- 


0.09 


3 


- 


27, 












- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


1.61 


- 


0.11 


- 


3 


2.31 


- 


28, 






4 






- 


0.06 


3 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.54 


- 


- 


29, 












0.03 1 


- 


0.932 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


30, 












- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.79 


3 


3 


0.58 


0.061 


31, 












- 


- 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


0.60 


0.06 


0.02 


0.12 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


' 


3.45 


3.41 


4.67 


2.91 


4.92 


1.99 


4.96 


3.90 


5.36 


2.18 


6.09 


1.94 



i Snow. 



Total for the year, 45.78 inches. 
2 Rain and snow. 3 Rainfall included in that following. 



142 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1919. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 1, . 




.30 


7.30 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. 


May 1, . 


\ .72 


7.15 p.m. to 




Jan. 2, 






1 


1.252 


6.00 a.m. to 


May 2, . 




J 




9.30 a.m. 


Jan. 3, 






j 




10.15 p.m. 


May 4, . 




1 .16 


11.00 p.m. to 




Jan. 3, 






1 


.16i 


10.15 p.m. to 


May 5, . 




J 




4.30 a.m. 


Jan. 4, 






f 




7.30 a.m. 


May 5, 




.03 


7.12 p.m. to 


7.30 p.m. 


Jan. 23, 






i 


1.36 


9.15 p.m. to 


May 10, 




] 1.86 


3.20 p.m. to 




Jan. 24, 






J 




7.45 a.m. 


May 13, 






3.30 a.m. 


Jan. 29, 








.09 


5.00 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


May 15, 




.04 


4.00 p.m. to 


6.00 p.m. 










May 17, 




.03 


3.30 a.m. to 


3.45 a.m. 








Total, 




3.16 




May 17, 
May 18, 
May 22, 
May 23, 




\ .54 
| 1.14 


6.25 p.m. to 
12.15 A.M. to 


3.15 A.M. 










7.30 a.m. 


Feb. 4, . 




.04 


6.20 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


May 24, 




.07 


8.20 p.m. to 1( 


Feb. 14, 




} 


.89 


5.20 a.m. to 


May 25, 




.40 


1.15 p.m. to 


9.00 p.m. 


Feb. 15, 






10.00 A.M. 










Feb. 15, 






.23 1 


10.00 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


Total, 


4.99 






Feb. 21, 




} 


.35 


2.50 p.m. to 

9.30 a.m. 










Feb. 22, 










Feb. 23, 






.952 


3.15 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 


June 7, . 


.03 


2.00 A.M. to 


2.45 a.m. 


Feb. 23, 






.46 


9.30 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 


June 9, . 


1 .40 


2.00 a.m. to 




Feb. 25, 




\ 


.92 


11.00 p.m. to 


June 10, 




2.45 a.m. 


Feb. 26, 




) 




10.00 A.M. 


June 17, 


.04 


2.00 p.m. to 


3.30 p.m. 


Feb. 28, 




\ 


.05 


12.30 p.m. to 


June 20, 


.07 


11.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


Mar. 1, . 




) 




7.30 a.m. 


June 26, 


} - 15 

.82 


11.30 p.m. to 












June 27, 
June 27, 

Total, 




7.00 A.M. 

8.00 p.m. 


Total, 


3.89 




2.00 p.m. to 




1.51 








.56 


7.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 




Mar. 1, . 










Mar. 5, . 




} 


.13 


5.15 p.m. to 


July 6, . 


.16 


2.30 a.m. to 


7.00 A.M. 


Mar. 6, . 






3.30 a.m. 


July 6, 




\ .10 


8.15 p.m. to 




Mar. 9, . 






1.25 


5.20 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


July 7, 




j 




5.30 a.m. 


Mar. 11, 






.04 


5.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


July 7, 




1 .04 


10.15 p.m. to 




Mar. 16, 




I 


2.08 


5.10 A.M. to 


July 8, 




j 




3.30 a.m. 


Mar. 19, 




J 




11.20 p.m. 


July 10, 




.43 


7.30 a.m. to 


7.10 p.m. 


Mar. 23, 




i 


.10 


4.00 A.M. to 


July 15, 




\ .59 


11.30 p.m. to 




Mar. 24, 




J 




4.00 A.M. 


July 16, 




j 




2.00 p.m. 


Mar. 28, 






.72 


2.10 a.m. to 4.20 p.m. 


July 18, 




1 1.72 


3.45 p.m. to 




Mar. 28, 




} 


.16 1 


4.20 p.m. to 


July 19, 




j 




11.15 A.M. 


Mar. 31, 






11.40 A.M. 


July 22, 




1 1.18 


4.30 a.m. to 












July 23, 




j 




4.15 p.m. 










Total, 




5.04 




July 26, 
July 31, 




.15 
.71 


2.15 p.m. to 
12.15 a.m. to 


7.00 p.m! 
7.30 a.m. 




Total, 


5.08 














Apr. 4, . 


} 


.11 

.06 


5.30 A.M. to 8.00 A.M. 

4.30 a.m. to 










Apr. 5, . 






* 






Apr. 6, . 






3.30 a.m. 


Aug. 1, . 


.14 


12.15 a.m. to 


9.00 A.M. 


Apr. 7, . 






.30 


6.30 p.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


Aug. 6, . 


1 .53 


2.00 p.m. to 




Apr. 10, . 






.06 


11.45 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


Aug. 7, . 


j 




10.25 a.m. 


Apr. 11, . 




} 


.54 


11.30 A.M. to 


Aug. 13, 


1 1.86 


9.15 p.m. to 




Apr. 12, . 






12.00 m. 


Aug. 15, 


j 




5.15 a.m. 


Apr. 16, . 






.07 


4.45 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 


Aug. 18, 


\ .24 


1.50 p.m. to 




Apr. 16, . 




\ 


1.68 


2.45 p.m. to 


Aug. 19, 


j 




9.00 A.M. 


Apr. 17, . 








9.50 p.m. 


Aug. 24, 


t - 74 


3.45 p.m. to 




Apr. 20, . 




1 


.08 


10.15 p.m. to 


Aug. 25, 


j 




12.15 A.M. 


Apr. 21, . 




/ 




4.00 A.M. 


Aug. 25, 


.20 


5.00 a.m. to 


1.30 p.m. 


Apr. 24, . 






.14 


2.00 p.m. to 11.15 p.m. 


Aug. 27, 


.13 


12.45 p.m. to 


4.30 p.m. 


Apr. 28, . 




} 


.05 


8.00 p.m. to 


Aug. 30, 


} M 


12.00 m. to 




Apr. 29, . 






3.15 A.M. 


Aug. 31, 




10.30 A.M. 


Tota 


1, 




3.09 


Tota 


1, • 


4.75 





1 Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 



Table No. 4. 



Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1919 
Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. Amount. 


Duration. 


Sept. 1, . 


\ 3.48 


5.40 p.m. to 




Nov. 1, . 


1 .94 


8.15 p.m. to 




Sept. 3, . 






11.30 p.m. 


Nov. 2, 








2.00 p.m. 


Sept. 7, . 




.04 


4.20 a.m. to 


8.30 a.m. 


Nov. 3, 






.03 


4.30 p.m. to 


6.30 p.m. 


Sept. 8, . 




1 2.09 


7.10 p.m. to 




Nov. 4, 






\ 1.27 


3.30 p.m. to 




Sept. 12, 






6.30 a.m. 


Nov. 6, 






j 




11.00 a.m. 


Sept. 12, 




.05 


4.45 p.m. to 


9.15 p.m. 


Nov. 12, 




1 .24 


9.00 a.m. to 




Sept. 15, 




I - 21 


12.15 p.m. to 




Nov. 13, 




f 




9.00 p.m. 


Sept. 16, 




J 




9.30 p.m. 


Nov. 19, 




1 .051 


5.15 p.m. to 




Sept. 22, 




1 .92 


2.20 p.m. to 




Nov. 20, 




/ 




2.45 a.m. 


Sept. 24, 




J 




1.30 A.M. 


Nov. 22, 




1 .03 


10.20 p.m. to 




Sept. 24, 




.16 


9.20 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


Nov. 23, 




j 




2.30 a.m. 


Sept. 30, 




.01 


9.00 p.m. to 


9.30 p.m. 


Nov. 25, 




1 2.09 


6.35 p.m. to 












Nov. 27, 
Nov. 29, 








8.15 A.M. 


Total, 


6.96 








j .48 


11.45 a.m. to 










Nov. 30, 




J 




7.30 a.m. 


Oct. 2, . 


1 .15 


11.45 p.m. to 




Total, 


5.13 




Oct. 3, 






) 




7.30 a.m. 










Oct. 4, 






1 .03 


8.30 p.m. to 












Oct. 5, 






) 




10.00 A.M. 










Oct. 6, 






.33 


8.00 a.m. to 


4.45 p.m. 










Oct. 9, 






\ .24 


6.30 p.m. to 












Oct. 10, 






1 .03 


9.15 p.m. to 


6.00 A.M. 










Oct. 11, 










Oct. 12, 






j 




1.45 A.M. 


Dec. 6, . 


\ .322 


9.20 p.m. to 




Oct. 14, 






\ .46 


1.30 p.m. to 




Dec. 7, 








2.00 A.M. 


Oct. 15, 






J 




6.20 p.m. 


Dec. 7, 






.06 


2.05 a.m. to 


5.00 p.m. 


Oct. 16, 






1 .37 ' 


8.50 p.m. to 




Dec. 8, 






\ 1.05 


6.10 p.m. to 




Oct. 17, 






j 




9.30 a.m. 


Dec. 10, 








7.30 a.m. 


Oct. 21, 






1 .10 


7.20 p.m. to 




Dec. 12, 






.11 


6.50 a.m. to 


2.00 p.m. 


Oct. 22, 






j 




5.30 a.m. 


Dec. 14, 






.222 


3.15 A.M. to 


4.00 p.m. 


Oct. 26, 






.09 


2.00 p.m. to 


5.00 p.m. 


Dec. 16, 






\ .071 


11.00 P.M. to 




Oct. 27, 






1 .58 


9.30 p.m. to 




Dec. 17, 






J 




6.30 a.m. 


Oct. 28, 






j 




9.00 A.M. 


Dec. 24, 






1 - 111 


5.00 A.M. to 




Oct. 30, 






\ - 17 


6.30 p.m. to 




Dec. 25, 






J 




1.30 A.M. 


Oct. 31, 






J 




7.30 a.m. 


Dec. 30, 






.061 


9.30 a.m. to 


5.15 p.m. 


Tota 


I, 




2.55 


Tota 


I, 




2.00 





i Snow. 



Total for the 3 r ear, 48.15 inches. 



2 Rain and snow, 



144 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 



















Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time. 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


IVlUJNTii. 


Hours. 


Minutes. 


January, 


25 


233 


45 


2,668.0 


February, 
















25 


381 


10 


1,836.2 


March, . 
















19 


286 


7 


877.9 


April, 
















23 


210 


5 


2,094.1 


May, 
















25 


254 


45 


3,369.6 


June, 
















25 


275 


20 


3,577.7 


July, 
















26 


260 


45 


3,135.9 


August, . 
















26 


301 


- 


3,797.2 


September, 
















25 


240 


30 


2,861.1 


October, 
















26 


254 


- 


3,326.8 


November, 
















21 


195 


45 


2,133.5 


December, 
















26 


277 


43 


4,024.7 


Totals, 


292 


132.12 days. 


33,702.7 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 

















Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time. 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


lVHJiN'J.'±l. 


Hours. 


Minutes. 


January, 


26 


362 


10 


1,465.9 


February, 














23 


341 


35 


1,361.2 


March, . 














26 


397 


54 


1,555.4 


April, 














25 


365 


1 


1,451.7 


May, 














26 


363 


44 


1,522.4 


June, 














25 


309 


43 


1,306.0 


July, 




- 










26 


327 


56 


1,351.2 


August, . 














26 


346 


47 


1,399.8 


September, 














25 


364 


14 


1,533.0 


October, 














26 


372 


3 


1,470.3 


November, 














23 


344 


- 


1,422.9 


December, 














26 


519 


37 


1,500.9 


Totals, 


303 


183.95 days. 


17,340.7 



158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 
From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January, 


31 


744 


2,247.4 


February, 




















28 


672 


1,606.1 


March, . 




















31 


743 


1,344.3 


April, . 




















30 


720 


1,733.9 


May, 




















31 


732 


1,855.3 


June, 




















30 


720 


2,289.8 


July, 




















31 


744 


2,410.3 


August, 




















31 


740 


2,203.1 


September, 




















30 


720 


1,881.2 


October, 




















31 


745 


2,181.4 


November, 




















30 


720 


1,794.6 


December, 




















31 


744 


2,384.8 


Totals, 


365 


364.36 days. 


23,932.2 







Water was drawn from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut Hill Reservoir on 65 days. The total quantity 
drawn was 713,900,000 gallons. 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts 

in 1919, by Months. 1 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


January, ...... 


85,919,000 


47,287,000 


72,497,000 


1,039,000 


February, 














65,411,000 


48,614,000 


57,361,000 


10,421,000 


March, 














28,193,000 


50,242,000 


43,423,000 


11,913,000 


April, . 














69,630,000 


48,390,000 


57,797,000 


703,000 


May, . 














108,526,000 


49,110,000 


59,848,000 


- 


June, . 














119,084,000 


43,533,000 


76,326,000 


- 


July, . 














100,981,000 


43,587,000 


77,752,000 


- 


August, 














122,313,000 


45,155,000 


71,067,000 


- 


September, 














95,200,000 


51,100,000 


62,707,000 


- 


October, 














106,959,000 


47,366,000 


70,273,000 


- 


November, 














70,913,000 


47,430,000 


59,820,000 


- 


December, 














129,645,000 


48,416,000 


76,929,000 


- 


Average, 


92,159,000 


47,509,000 


65,568,000 


1,956,000 








» I 


*Tot ii 


iclud 


ing q 


uant 


ti 


es wasted while < 


cleaning and rep< 


liring aqueducts 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 



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lions) 


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and 

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Portions 

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and Mil 

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Revere, 
Winthrop, 
Swampscott, 
Nahant, Stone- 
ham, Melrose 
and Portions of 
Boston, Chelsea, 
Everett, Maiden, 
Medford and 
Somerville 
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*2 


O 








O 








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1—1 


















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Quincy, 
Watertown, 
and Portions 

of Boston, 

Belmont and 

Milton 

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■* 


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w 
































t, H 

II 


ions of 

estown, 

3rville, 

3lsea, 

srett, 

lden, 

rd, East 

an and 

ngton 

lions). 

















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15 2 


ston, 

uding 

Boston 

nd 

lestown 

lions). 


O 


O 


O 


O 





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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 



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6 

05 

Q 


< 


1 



170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



s 

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172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 24. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 

1892-1919. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 













Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


oi 

.2 

3 

o 


£ 

GO 

a 

O 

o> 

c 
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1892, 








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4.70 


1.67 


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.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


- 


1.9 


1893, 










.53 


4.54 


1.84 


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.0174 


.0147 


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.38 


.60 


1.8 


1894, 










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4.64 


1.83 


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.0169 


.0150 


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.41 


.63 


1.7 


1895, 










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4.90 


2.02 


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.0175 


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.40 


.69 


0.7 


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4.29 


1.67 


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.0165 


.0142 


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.37 


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1897, 










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4.82 


1.84 


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.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


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1.6 


1898, 










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4.19 


1.60 


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.0152 


.0136 


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.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899, 










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3.70 


1.30 


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.0122 


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.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900, 










.29 


3.80 


1.20 


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.0157 


.0139 


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.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901, 










.29 


4.43 


1.64 


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.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902, 










.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903, 










.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904, 










.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905, 










.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


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.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906, 










.24 


3.86 


1.39 


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.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907, 










.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908, 










.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909, 










.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910, 










.14 


3.05 


1.24 


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.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911, 










.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912, 










.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913, 










.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914, 










.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915, 










.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916, 










.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


- 


1.4 


1917, 










.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


- 


1.3 


1918, 










.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


- 


1.4 


1919, 










.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


- 


1.5 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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174 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 



Table No. 26. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1919. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 















Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Yeak. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, ..... 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899 












224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900 

h 

1901 

1902 

|p 
1903 












248 


113 


256 


188 


181 












225 
203 

76 


149 
168 
120 


169 

121 

96 


162 
164 
126 


168 
246 
243 


1904 
1905 












347 


172 


220 


176 


355 












495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906 












231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907 












147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908 












162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909 












198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910 












216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911 












205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912 












429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913 












123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914 












288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915 












163 


- 


128 


117 


134 


1916 












128 


- 


85 


102 


105 


1917 












178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918 












1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919 

r 












92 


85 


100 


70 


84 



176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



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178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 29. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1919. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


S 

a 

03 


a 
a 

'2 

si 


(5 


a 

a 

S3 

3 


a 
a 

'a 

3 


a 

o3 


a 

B 

a 

o3 


a 
a 

"8 

3 


c 

03 


January, .... 


59 


—7 


27.5 


56 


- 


30.8 


56 


—3 


30.1 


February, 








51 


3 


27.3 


48 


9 


30.8 


_i 


-1 


_i 


March, 








67 


2 


36.5 


66 


13 


40.2 


66 


12 


39.4 


April, 








68 


12 


43.5 


72 


18 


46.8 


70 


17 


45.0 


May, 








89 


30 


56.0 


91 


36 


59.8 


89 


37 


57.2 


June, 








100 


35 


65.8 


99 


44 


69.0 


96 


43 


67.0 


July, 








99 


41 


70.0 


99 


49 


73.9 


95 


51 


72.2 


August, . 








88 


42 


64.8 


89 


46 


67.8 


85 


49 


65.8 


September, 








89 


31 


60.5 


89 


40 


63.7 


83 


37 


61.5 


October, . 








79 


22 


51.7 


80 


28 


54.6 


80 


26 


52.8 


November, 








66 


14 


38.4 


66 


21 


41.5 


67 


20 


40.9' 


December, 








56 


—14 


23.7 


57 


—8 


27.0 


66 


—10 


26.5 


Averages fo 


r the 


year 




- 


- 


47.1 


- 


- 


50.5 


- 


- 


- 



1 Thermometer out of order. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



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[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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Works, 
Arlington, 
Belmont, 
Boston, 
Chelsea, 
Everett, 
Lexington, 
Maiden, 
Medford, 
Melrose, 
Milton, 
Nahant, 
Quincy, . 
Revere, x . 
Somerville 
Stoneham, 
Swampscot 
Watertown 
Winthrop, 



3 

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182 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 33. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services metered, 
Fire Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns supplied by 
the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 81, 1919. 



City or Town. 


Services. 


Meters. 


Per Cent 

of Services 

Metered. 


Services 
used for 

Fire 

Purposes 

only. 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


Arlington, 












3,246 


3,246 


100.00 


15 


511 


Belmont, . 












1,794 


1,794 


100.00 


3 


275 


Boston, 












105,978 


64,078 


60.46 


1,735 


9,741 


Chelsea, . 












5,243 


5,210 


99.37 


57 


401 


Everett, . 












6,093 


4,081 


66.98 


20 


647 


Lexington, 












1,326 


1,310 


98.79 


6 


222 


Maiden, . 












8,229 


7,999 


97.21 


48 


631 


Medford, . 












6,771 


6,771 


100.00 


19 


727 


Melrose, . 












4,431 


4,386 


98.98 


19 


384 


Milton, 












2,170 


2,170 


100.00 


1 


443 


Nahant, . 












766 


568 


74.15 


- 


102 


Quincy, . 












10,831 


9,837 


90.82 


15 


1,233 


Revere, 1 . 












4,824 


3,841 


79.62 


4 


314 


Somerville, 












13,524 


10,450 


77.27 


37 


1,241 


Stoneham, 












1,674 


1,672 


99.88 


- 


156 


Swampscott, 
Watertown, 












1,988 
3,355 


1,988 
3,355 


100.00 
100.00 


2 
21 


202 
423 


Winthrop, 












2,997 


2,983 


99.53 


5 


320 


Totals, 


185,240 


135,739 


73.28 


2,007 


17,973 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 



Appendix No . 3 . 



WATER WORKS STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1919. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water 
District, which includes the following cities and towns : — 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1915. 



Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1919. 



Arlington 

Belmont, . . . . . ' . 

Boston 

Chelsea, 

Everett, . . . . . . . 

Lexington, 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Milton, . . . .' 

Nahant, 

Newton, 1 

Quincy 

Revere 

Somerville 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott 

Watertown, 

Winthrop, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus, 2 



14,889 

8,081 

745,439 

43,426 

37,718 

5,538 

48,907 

30,509 

16,880 

8,600 

1,387 

43,113 

40,674 

25,178 

86,854 

7,489 

7,345 

16,515 

12,758 



1,201,300 
280 



17,530 

9,710 

804,140 

48,840 

41,610 

6,020 

53,150 

35,860 

18,170 

9,450 

1,570 

45,990 

45,280 

30,640 

94,800 

7,840 

8,160 

19,140 

15,170 



1,313,070 
280 



1 No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

2 Only a small portion of Saugus was supplied with water. 



Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 : — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 



186 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Description of coal used: — Bituminous: 72.9 per cent Nanty-Glo and Daven- 
port. Anthracite: screenings 27.1 per cent. Price per gross ton in bins: 
bituminous $6.89 to $7.35, screenings $5.71 to $6.09. Average price per gross 
ton $6.95. Per cent ashes 13.6. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used: — Bituminous: 73.5 per cent Nanty-Glo, Davenport 

and Ake. Anthracite: screenings 26.5 per cent. Price per gross ton in bins: 

bituminous $5.79 to $7.05, screenings $4.95 to $5.55. Average price per 

gross ton $5.81. Per cent ashes 15.2. 

Spot Pond Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used: — Bituminous: 60.3 per cent Davenport, Nanty-Glo 

and Ake. Anthracite: screenings 39.7 per cent. Price per gross ton in bins : 

bituminous $6.99 to $8.40, screenings $4.95 to $5.88. Average price per gross 

ton $6.86. Per cent ashes 14.4. 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1. 








Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Totals. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 
Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station ex- 
penses. 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 
gallons). 

Average dynamic head (feet), .... 

Cost per million gallons pumped, .... 
Cost per million foot gallons, .... 


16,000,000 

1,365.57 
133 .06 


20,000,000 

165.96 
128.05 


30,000,000 

926 .23 
125 .08 


66,000,000 

4,444,385 

$42,556 87 

2,457.76 

129.71 

$17.3153 

.1335 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2. 



Engines Nos. 
5, 6 and 7. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



Totals. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), . . . . 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

gallons). 
Average dynamic head (feet) 

Cost per million gallons pumpei, 

Cost per million foot gallons, 



105,000,000 



10,597.89 
29.70 



40,000,000 



12,710.09 
122.48 



145,000,000 

13,199,141 

$103,475 51 

23,307.98 

80.29 

$4 .4395 

.0553 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 



Spot Pond Pumping Station. 



Engines Nos. 8 
and 9. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million foot gallons, 



30,000,000 

3,182,051 

$26,223 03 

3,059.80 

132.60 

$8.5702 

.0646 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns sup- 
plied wholly or partially during the year 1919, . . . 1,267,080 

Total consumption (gallons), meter basis, 44,016,611,000 1 

Average daily consumption (gallons), meter basis, . . . 120,593,500 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, meter basis, ... 95 . 2 



Distribution. 



Metropolitan 
Water Works. 



Cities and Towns 
supplied by 
Metropolitan 
Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, 

Sizes, 

Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 
Length in use (miles), . ... 

Stop-gates added, 

Stop-gates now in use, .... 
Service pipes added, .... 

Service pipes now in use, 
Meters added, . . . ... 

Meters now in use, 

Fire hydrants added, .... 
Fire hydrants now in use, 



_2 

76-4 inch. 

1.81 

126.08 

8 

544 



-2 

48-4 inch. 

10.18 

1,796.61 



2,191 

185,240 

2,965 

135,739 

268 

17,973 



1 66.2 per cent pumped; 33.8 per cent by gravity. 

2 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 



188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 4 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



144i 



146 1 



1471 



148 



2. 

WORK. 



Part of Section 76, Reading 
Extension, North Metropoli- 
tan System in Wakefield 
and Reading. 

Section 73, Reading Extension, 
North Metropolitan System 
in Woburn and Stoneham. 



2,500 tons of coal for Deer 
Island pumping station. 

2,500 tons of coal for East 
Boston pumping station. 

500 tons of coal for Charles- 
town pumping station. 

Section 74, Reading Extension, 
North Metropolitan System 
in Stoneham. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$19,200 00 



$8.95 per 

ton 
$8.65 per 

ton 
$8.62 per 

ton 

$30,692 00 



$17,694 00 2 



$8.50 per 

ton 2 
$8.25 per 

ton 2 
$8.25 per 

ton 2 

$26,016 00 2 



6. 

Contractor. 



Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 



Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, Chelsea. 



Maritime Coal Com- 
pany, Boston. 



Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, Chelsea. 



Contracts relating to the 



138 1 



139 1 



Section 98, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley Extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
West Roxbury and Dedham. 

Part of Section 99, High-level 
sewer, Wellesley Extension, 
South Metropolitan System 
in Dedham. 



$79,040 00 



93,070 00 



$54,630 00 2 



92,870 00 



Thomas Russo & Co., 
Boston. 



Rowe Contracting 
Company, Boston. 



Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



189 



Appendix No . 4 



the Year 1919 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1919. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 



July 29, 1918 



June 18, 1919 



Sept. 11, 1919 



Nov. 26, 1919 



May 28, 1919 



Sept. 17, 1919 



Oct. 15, 1919 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench and laying 
of pipe for 15-inch and 18-inch Akron pipe sewer, 
$3.69 per lin. ft. ; for Portland cement brick masonry 
in manholes and special structures, §25 per cu. yd. ; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry in trench and 
special structures $9.20 per cu. yd.; for bank gravel 
refill around pipe sewer in trench, $3 per cii. yd. 

$8.50 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
$8.25 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 
$8.25 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 

Charlestown pumping station. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench and laying 
of pipe for 15-inch, 18-inch, and 20-inch Akron pipe 
sewer, $6.10 per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick 
masonry in manholes and special structures, $30 per 
cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete masonry in 
trench and special structures, $15 per cu. yd. ; for 
bank gravel refill around pipe sewer in trench, $2 per 
cu. yd.; for rock excavation in trench, $7 per cu. 

yd. 



$69,866 38 



17,598 51 



17,956 62 

17,980 05 

7,425 00 

22,429 93 



South Metropolitan System. 



July 13, 1916 
June 7, 1918 


July 17, 1919 
Nov. 5, 1919 


Work abandoned by the Contractor before any portion 
was completed. Work provided for is now being 
completed in accordance with the specifications by 
Geo. M. Bryne. 


$226,480 79 
82,255 95 


1 
2 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 



■ 


1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


3 

4 
5 


145 

1472 
149 


Section 101, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley Extension, South 
Metropolitan System in Ded- 
ham and Needham. 

400 tons of coal for Nut Island 
screen-house. 

Part of Section 99, High-level 
sewer, Wellesley Extension, 
South Metropolitan System 
in Dedham. 


5 

2 
6 


$90,080 00 

$8.80 per 
ton 

$67,800 00 


$72,046 60 » 

$8.60 per 
toni 

$47,675 OQi 


Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, Chelsea. 

Maritime Coal Com- 
pany, Boston. 

John C. Cavanagh 
Company, Boston. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



the Year 1919 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
South Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1919. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1919. 



Sept. 17, 1919 



May 28, 1919 



Sept. 29, 1919 



Oct. 15, 1919 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 33-inch by 36-inch and 27-inch by 30- 
inch concrete sewer and 16-inch cast-iron pipe 
siphon crossing Charles River, $9.24 perlin.ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes , siphon 
head-houses and special structures, $30 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry in trench, 
siphon head-houses, and special structures, $13.74 
percu. yd.; for spruce piles in trench and riverbed 
in place, $0.65 "per lin. ft.; for rock excavation in 
trench, $7 per cu. yd. 

$8.60 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on wharf at 
Nut Island screen-house. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 33-inch 
by 36-inch concrete sewer and 30-inch cast-iron 
pipe, $18.50 per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick 
masonry in manholes and special structures, $30 per 
cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete masonry in 
trench and special structures, $16 per cu. yd.; for 
spruce piles in trench and river bed in place, $0.40 
perlin.ft.; for rock excavation in trench, $9 per cu. 

yd. 



$2,992 80 
1,060 00 



2 Contract completed. 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the year 1919 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 



Sewerage Works 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1919. 



North Metropolitan System, 4 contracts, 

South Metropolitan System, 5 contracts 

Total of 9 contracts made and pending during the year 1919, 

I 



$153,256 49 
312,789 54 



8466,046 03 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 193 



Appendix No . 5 . 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 6, 1920. 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, 
disbursements, assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board for the year ending November 30, 1919, together 
with recommendations for legislation, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan 
W r ater acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the ex- 
penditures for the construction and acquisition of works, and the 
balance available on December 1, 1919, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, including 
appropriations under Gen. Sts. 1919, cs. 165, 166 and 167, to 
provide an additional water supply for the town of Milton, 
the Hyde Park and the East Boston districts of the city of 
Boston, and the town of Lexington, respectively, . . . $42,980,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropoli- 
tan Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 
Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the 
credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1919, . $1,755 25 
For the period prior to December 1, 1918, . 257,143 42 

258,898 67 



Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Loan Fund : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . $93,758 90 
For the period prior to December 1, 1918, 43,153,743 56 



$43,328,898 67 



43,247,502 46 

Balance December 1, 1919, $81,396 21 



194 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $42,913,000, bonds to the amount of 
$161,000 having been issued during the year. Of the total amount 
issued, $41,398,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, 
amounting to $1,515,000, were issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was 
$42,735,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $178,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year $37,000 
in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on De- 
cember 1, 1919, to $15,904,545.14, an increase during the year of 
$1,033,710.30. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of works for the year ending November 30, 
1919, $647,200 00 

Special appropriation for protection of water supply 
aqueducts (1911) remaining, 9,930 60 

Special appropriations for ' protection and improve- 
ment of the water supply (1912, 1913, 1916 and 
1918) remaining, 26,260 97 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending 

November 30, 1919, 5,728 12 

$689,119 69 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and 
operation of works during the year ending No- 
vember 30, 1919, $631,835 95 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the year 

1918, 22,738 73 

609,097 22 

Balance December 1, 1919, $80,022 47 

. This balance includes the sum of $9,930.60, the amount remaining 
unexpended of the special appropriation for the protection of the 
water supply in aqueducts, and the sums of $2,713.93, the amount 
remaining unexpended of the special appropriation in 1912, $0.89 
of the special appropriation in 1913, $714.89 of the special appropri- 
ation in 1916 and $17,347.05 of the appropriation in 1918 for the 
protection and improvement of the water supply. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 195 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1919, $85,971.59 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and 
power and from other proceeds from the operations of the Board,, 
which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are- 
applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the payment of 
interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund require- 
ments, and 'expenses of maintenance and operation of works, in 
reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metropolitan Water 
District for the year. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for 
admission to the District, have been applied as follows : — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to Decem- 
ber 1, 1918, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking 
Fund, as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, . . 88,638 56 

For the year beginning December 1, 1918, and ending November 
30, 1919, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund 
as provided by said last-named act, 9,789 38 



$318,293 59 



Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for 
the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts 
which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures 
for construction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, including those for 
the Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions, 
North System enlargements and extensions, 
New Mystic Sewer, Deer Island outfall ex- 
tension, lowering sewer siphon under Maiden 
River, balance of appropriation under chap- 
ter 76, Resolves of 1915, and for the Reading 
Extension, $7,512,365 73 



Amount carried forward, .... $7,512,365 73 



196 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Amount brought forward, .... $7,512,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from mis- 
cellaneous sources, which are placed to the 
credit of the North Metropolitan System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . 61 95 

For the period prior to December 1, 1918, . 86,021 19 

Amount approved for payment by the Board x 
out of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, 
North System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . $104,312 98 

For the period prior to December 1, 1918, . 7,324,251 94 



$7,598,448 87 $7,428,564 92 
Balance December 1, 1919, $169,883 95 

South Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, applied to the 
construction of the Charles River valley sewer, 
Neponset valley sewer, High-level sewer and 
^extensions (including Wellesley Branch), and 
an additional appropriation authorized by 
chapter 237, General Acts of 1919, and for ad- 
ditional Ward Street station pumping plant, . $9,812,046 27 
Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and 
from miscellaneous sources, which are placed 
to the credit of the South Metropolitan Sys- 
tem: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . 269 62 

For the period prior to December 1, 1918, . 19,415 03 

Amount approved by Board for payment as fol- 
lows : — 

On account of the Charles River valley 

sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tensions : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1919, 120,557 92 

For the period prior to December 1, 1918, 7,758,592 91 



$9,831,730 92 $9,590,728 56 
Balance December 1, 1919, $241,002 36 

1 The word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor, the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 197 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at 
the end of the fiscal year was $17,086,412, no additional bonds hav- 
ing been issued during the year. Of the total amount issued, 
$15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting 
to $1,645,500, were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$16,895,412, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $47,500 had been paid during the year, $191,000 having 
been paid to December 1, 1919. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,360,500 
were issued for the North Metropolitan System and $9,534,912 for 
the South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1919, to $4,695,573.07, of 
which $2,946,215.08 was on account of the North Metropolitan 
System and $1,749,357.99 was on account of the South Metropoli- 
tan System, an increase during the year of $425,367.57. 

The net debt on December 1, 1919, was $12,199,838.93, a decrease 
of $472,867.57. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System 
is $925,500 in serial bonds, of which $128,000 has been paid, and 
$720,000 for the South Metropolitan System, of which $63,000 has 
been paid. 

Maintenance. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1919, . . . $260,000 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned 
to the appropriation: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . . . . . 2,098 43 



$262,098 43 



Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . . $233,865 68 
Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the 
year 1918, 15,090 46 



218,775 22 

Balance December 1, 1919, $43,323 21 



198 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1919, . . . $152,000 00 
Receipts from sales of property, reimbursement and for pumping, 
which are returned to the appropriation : — , 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, 397 76 



$152,397 76 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1919, . . $147,528 39 
Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the year 

1918, . 11,000 91 

136,527 48 



Balance December 1, 1919, . $15,870 28 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 199 



Appendix No . 6 . 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1919 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



General Acts, 1919. 

Chapter 2. 

An Act kelative to the interest on bonds issued to 
provide for the completion of certain authorized 
improvements in the metropolitan water works. 

Whereas, The finances of the commonwealth require the 
immediate sale of the securities mentioned in the following 
act, and it is not possible to sell the same without raising 
the rate of interest thereon as fixed by law, it is accordingly 
hereby declared that the act, being necessary for the im- 
mediate preservation of the public convenience, is an emer- 
gency measure, therefore 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter one hundred and fifty -seven of the 1918, 157 (G), 
General Acts of nineteen hundred and eighteen is hereby 
amended by adding at the end thereof the words: — The 
rate of interest to be paid under the provisions of this act 
shall be such as the treasurer and receiver general, with the 
approval of the governor and council, may determine, — so 
as to read as follows : — The treasurer and receiver general, Ra te of int ?r- 

. est on bonds 

in order to provide for the increased cost of constructing a f or completing 

. . , certain metro- 

line for the transmission of electricity between the power poiitan water 

works 1m- 

station at the Wachusett dam in Clinton and the power provements. 
station at the Sudbury dam in Southborough, to relocate 
and connect meters for the measuring of water supplied 
through the low service to the metropolitan water district, 
to construct a 12-inch pipe line in Poplar street, West 
Roxbury, and under the Neponset river, and to install a 
new pumping engine at the Arlington pumping station, all 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



of which improvements were authorized by chapter one 
hundred and seventy-two of the General Acts of nineteen 
hundred and sixteen, shall issue from time to time, upon 
the request of the metropolitan water and sewerage board, 
bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth and 
under its seal, to an amount not exceeding four thousand 
dollars, said sum being the amount of the unexpended bal- 
ance of six hundred thousand dollars authorized by chapter 
six hundred and ninety-four of the acts of nineteen hundred 
and twelve. The rate of interest to be paid under the pro- 
visions of this act shall be such as the treasurer and receiver 
general, with the approval of the governor and council, may 
determine. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved January 28, 1919. 



1918, 177 (G), 
§ 2, amended. 



Rate of inter- 
est on bonds 
for additional 
water supply 
for Belmont 
and Watertown. 



Chapter 6. 

An Act relative to the rate of interest on bonds 
issued to provide an additional water supply for 
the towns of watertown and belmont. 

Whereas, The finances of the commonwealth require the 
immediate sale of the securities mentioned in the following 
act, and it is not possible to sell the same without raising 
the rate of interest thereon as fixed by law, it is accordingly 
hereby declared that the act, being necessary for the im- 
mediate preservation of the public convenience, is an emer- 
gency measure, therefore 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section two of chapter one hundred and 
seventy-seven of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and 
eighteen is hereby amended by adding at the end thereof 
the Words : — The rate of interest to be paid under the pro- 
visions of this act shall be such as the treasurer and receiver 
general, with the approval of the governor and council, may 
determine. The bonds issued under this act shall be des- 
ignated on the face thereof Metropolitan Water Loam — 
so as to read as follows: — Section 2. To meet expenses 
incurred hereunder, the treasurer and receiver general shall, 
from time to time, issue, upon the request of said board, 
bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth to an 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 201 

amount not exceeding one hundred and fifteen thousand 
dollars in addition to the sum of forty-two million seven 
hundred and ninety-eight thousand dollars authorized by 
chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in amendment 
thereof and in addition thereto, and the provisions of said 
chapter and acts shall apply to the loan hereby authorized. 
The rate of interest to be paid under the provisions of this 
act shall be such as the treasurer and receiver general, with 
the approval of the governor and council, may determine. 
The bonds issued under this act shall be designated on the 
face thereof Metropolitan Water Loan. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 4> 1919. 



Chapter 152. 

An Act to pkovide for vacations with pay for certain 
persons regularly employed by the common- 
WEALTH. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. All laborers, workmen and mechanics, who Vacations of 
are within the provisions of chapter four hundred and employees of 
ninety-four of the acts of nineteen hundred and eleven, and wealth." 
amendments, and who are permanently in the service or 
employ of the commonwealth, of the metropolitan water 
and sewerage board or of the metropolitan park commission 
shall be entitled to an annual vacation of not less than 
twelve working days with pay. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect on the first day of T^of 

taking effect. 

December, nineteen hundred and nineteen. [Approved 
May 3, 1919. 

Chapter 161. 

An Act to authorize the construction of a main 
trunk sewer to connect the town of reading 
with the north metropolitan sewerage system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section two of chapter one hundred and fifty-nine of the 1916, 259 (G), 
General Acts of nineteen hundred and sixteen, as amended 
by chapter three of the General Acts of nineteen hundred 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



and seventeen, is hereby further amended by inserting after 

the word "sewers", in the fifth line, the words: — and 

other works in and, — so as to read as follows : — Section 2. 

Metropolitan The metropolitan water and sewerage board shall provide 

water and r . 

sewerage board an outlet at the Reading town line in or near Brook street 

to provide ° 

outlet for f or the sewage of said town, and, acting on behalf of the 

sewage of ° . 

Reading. commonwealth shall construct a main trunk sewer or sewers 

and other works in and through such parts of the towns of 
Reading, Wakefield and Stoneham and the city of Woburn 
from the Reading town line to such point in the north met- 
ropolitan system as said board may determine to be neces- 
sary in order to connect with a main trunk sewer in the 
Mystic valley. [Approved May 13, 1919. 



Additional 
water supply 
for Milton and 
Hyde Park. 



Issue of bonds 
to meet 
expenses, etc. 



Chapter 165. 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board to provide an additional water 
supply for the town of milton and the hyde 
park district of the city of boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is hereby authorized to construct a twelve-inch metropolitan 
water main in Poplar street, West Roxbury, and under 
Neponset river, to provide an additional supply of water 
for Milton and the Hyde Park district of the city of Bos- 
ton. 

Section 2. To meet the expenses incurred under the 
provisions of this act the treasurer and receiver general 
shall, from time to time, issue upon the request of the said 
board, bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth, 
and under its seal, to an amount not exceeding fourteen 
thousand dollars, in addition to the sum of forty-two 
million nine hundred and thirteen thousand dollars hereto- 
fore authorized to be issued by chapter four hundred and 
eighty-eight of the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety- 
five, and acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto. 
The bonds hereby authorized shall bear such rates of in- 
terest as the treasurer and receiver general, with the ap- 
proval of the governor and council, may fix and shall be 
for terms not exceeding forty years, as recommended by the 
governor in his message to the general court dated April 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 203 

twenty-fourth, nineteen hundred and nineteen, in accord- 
ance with section three of Article LXII of the amendments 
to the constitution; and the provisions of said chapter four 
hundred and eighty-eight and acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto shall otherwise, so far as they are 
applicable, apply to the indebtedness and proceedings au- 
thorized by this act. [Approved May 14, 1919. 



Chapter 166. 

An Act to enable the meteopolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO PROVIDE AN ADDITIONAL WATER 
MAIN FOR THE SUPPLY OF THE EAST BOSTON DISTRICT 
OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. To enable the metropolitan water and sew- Additional 
erage board to construct a thirty-six-inch water main, about for East 
eighteen hundred feet in length, to provide an additional 
water supply for the East Boston district of the city of 
Boston, the board is hereby authorized to use the unex- 
pended balance of twenty-nine thousand eight hundred and 
twenty dollars and eighty-six cents of the sum authorized 
for said purpose by chapter three hundred and twenty-two 
of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and seventeen. 

Section 2. To meet further expenditures to be incurred tomee°t bonds 
under this act the treasurer and receiver general shall, from ex P enses > etc - 
time to time, issue upon the request of the said board, 
bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth, and 
under its seal, to an amount not exceeding eleven thousand 
dollars, in addition to the sum of forty-two million nine 
hundred and thirteen thousand dollars heretofore authorized 
to be issued by chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of 
the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in 
amendment thereof and in addition thereto. The bonds 
hereby authorized shall bear such rates of interest as the 
treasurer and receiver general, with the approval of the 
governor and council, may fix and shall be for terms not 
exceeding forty years, as recommended by the governor in 
his message to the general court dated April twenty-fourth, 
nineteen hundred and nineteen, in accordance with section 
three of Article LXII of the amendments to the constitu- 
tion; and the provisions of said chapter four hundred and 



204 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



eighty-eight and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto shall otherwise, so far as they are applicable, apply 
to the indebtedness and proceedings authorized by this act. 
[Approved May 14, 1919. 



Additional 
water supply 
for Lexington. 



Issue of bonds 
to meet 
expenses, etc. 



Chapter 167. 

An Act to authokize the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board to provide an additional supply 
of water for the town of lexington. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is hereby authorized to construct a sixteen-inch metropoli- 
tan water main for a distance of about six thousand feet 
from the standpipe in Arlington to the boundary line 
between Arlington, and Lexington. 

Section 2. To meet the expenditures to be incurred 
under this act, the said board is authorized to use the un- 
expended balance of fourteen thousand four hundred and 
eight dollars and ninety-two cents of the sum authorized by 
chapter one hundred and seventy-seven of the General Acts 
of nineteen hundred and eighteen, and the treasurer and 
receiver general shall, from time to time, issue, upon the 
request of the said board, bonds in the name and behalf 
of the commonwealth, and under its seal, to an amount not 
exceeding forty-two thousand dollars, in addition to the 
sum of forty-two million, nine hundred and thirteen thou- 
sand dollars heretofore authorized to be issued by chapter 
four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of eighteen hun- 
dred and ninety-five, and acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto. The bonds hereby authorized shall bear 
such rates of interest as the treasurer and receiver general, 
with the approval of the governor and council, may fix 
and shall be for terms not exceeding forty years, as recom- 
mended by the governor in his message to the general court 
dated April twenty-fourth, nineteen hundred and nineteen, 
in accordance with section three of Article LXII of the 
amendments to the constitution; and the provisions of said 
chapter four hundred and eighty-eight, and acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto shall otherwise, so far 
as they are applicable, apply to the indebtedness and pro- 
ceedings authorized by this act. [Approved May 14, 1919. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 205 



Chapter 237. 

An Act to provide for the completion by the metro- 
politan WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD OF THE WELLES- 
LEY EXTENSION OF THE SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWER- 
AGE SYSTEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

The treasurer and receiver general, in order to provide issue of bonds 

. . to meet 

for the completion of the extension of the high-level sewer expenses of 

■*■ completion of 

authorized bv chapter three hundred and forty-three of the Weiiesiey 

" . r v extension of 

acts of nineteen hundred and fourteen, shall, with the ap- high-level 

• # A sewer. 

proval of the governor and council, issue from time to time 
scrip or certificates of debt in the name and behalf of the 
commonwealth and under its seal, to an amount not exceed- 
ing two hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars, in addi- 
tion to the amount authorized to be issued by said chapter 
and by chapter two hundred and eighty-five of the General 
Acts of nineteen hundred and seventeen; the rate of interest 
thereon to be such as the treasurer and receiver general, 
with the approval of the governor and council, may fix. 
The said scrip or certificates shall be issued for terms not 
exceeding forty years, as recommended by the governor in 
his message to the general court dated April twenty-fourth, 
nineteen hundred and nineteen, in accordance with section 
three of Article LXII of the amendments to the constitu- 
tion; and the provisions of said chapter three hundred and 
forty-three and of chapter four hundred and twenty^-four 
of the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety-nine and of all 
acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto shall 
otherwise, so far as they are applicable, apply to the in- 
debtedness and proceedings authorized by this act. [Ap- 
proved June 12, 1919. 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Revere may 
sell certain 
property in 
Saugus. 



1889, 382, 
repealed. 



Time of 
taking effect. 



Special Acts, 1919. 

Chapter 173. 

An Act to authorize the city of revere to sell cer- 
tain PROPERTY IN THE TOWN OF SAUGUS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The city of Revere may sell, and the town of 
Saugus may purchase, the structures, pipes, and other ap- 
pliances owned by the said city in the said town and used 
for supplying water to the inhabitants of the town. In case 
the said city and town are unable to agree upon a price 
therefor, the same shall be fixed by the metropolitan water 
and sewerage board, and the price so fixed shall be binding 
upon the said city and town. In case the said town does 
not, on or before the first day of September, nineteen hun- 
dred and twenty, purchase or agree to purchase the said 
property, the same may be sold by the said city to any 
other purchaser. 

Section 2. Chapter three hundred and eighty-two of 
the acts of eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, and so much 
of any other act as is inconsistent herewith, are hereby 
repealed. 

Section 3. Section one of this act shall take effect upon 
its passage. Section two shall take effect on the first day 
of September, nineteen hundred and twenty. [Approved 
May 9, 1919. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 207 



Resolves, 1919. 

Chapteb 49. 

Resolve providing for an investigation by the state 
department of health and the metropolitan water 
and sewerage board relative to water supply 
needs and resources and to the use of great 

PONDS. 

Resolved, That the state department of health and the investigation 
metropolitan water and sewerage board, acting jointly, needfand Uppy 
shall forthwith proceed to investigate the water supply common- 
needs of the inhabitants of the commonwealth, including made by state 
all questions relating to the quantity of water to be ob- health and 
tained from available sources, its quality, the best methods water and 
of protecting the purity of the water, the construction, board. 
operation and maintenance of works for storing, conveying 
and purifying the water, the cost of the same, the damages 
to property, and all matters pertaining to the subject. The 
said board shall also consider and report whether any of 
the great ponds now used as sources of water supply might 
better be devoted to purposes of public recreation, and 
shall determine the extent to which boating, fishing or other 
use of any such sources may properly be authorized. The 
said board shall have power to employ such engineering 
and other assistance and to incur such expenses as may be 
necessary for carrying out the provisions of this resolve, 
and shall report fully with plans and estimates to the gen- 
eral court on or before the first Wednesday in January in 
the year nineteen hundred and twenty-one, including in its 
report drafts of any legislation recommended by it. Before 
incurring any expense the board shall, from time to time, 
estimate the amount required therefor, and shall submit 
the same to the governor and council for their approval, 
and no expense shall be incurred beyond the amount so 
estimated and approved. [Approved June 24, 1919. 



208 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



INDEX TO LEGISLATION OF THE TEAE 1919 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. Chap. Sect, 

to provide an additional water supply for East Boston, . . . G. 166 2 

to provide an additional water supply for Lexington, . . . G. 167 2 

to provide an additional water supply for Milton and Hyde Park, . G. 165 2 

to provide for completion of Wellesley Extension sewer, . . . G. 237 2 

B. 
BONDS. 

relative to interest on, for completion of certain improvements in 

Metropolitan Water Works, G. 2 1 

relative to interest on, to provide an additional water supply for 

Watertown and Belmont, . . . . . . . G. 6 1 

E. 
EAST BOSTON. 

to provide an additional water main for the supply of, . . G. 166 1 

EMPLOYEES, STATE. 

relative to vacations of certain, . . . • . . . . G. 152 1 

H. 
HYDE PARK. 

to provide additional water supply for, . . . . . . G. 165 1 

L. 
LEXINGTON. 

to provide additional water supply for, . . . . . . G. 167 1 

M. 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

authorized to provide additional water supply for East Boston, . G. 166 1 

authorized to provide additional water supply for Lexington, . . G. 167 1 

authorized to provide additional water supply for Milton and Hyde 

Park G. 165 1 

MILTON. 

to provide additional water supply for, . . . . . . G. 165 1 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 209 



R. 

READING. Chap. Sect. 

amendment to act authorizing sewer extension to, . . . . G. 161 - 

REVERE. 

authorized to sell certain property in Saugus, . . . S. 173 1 

V. 
VACATIONS. 

relative to, for certain State employees, . . . . . G. 152 - 

W. 

WATER SUPPLY NEEDS AND RESOURCES. 

State Department of Health and Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board to investigate, . . . . . . . . Res. 49 

WELLESLEY. 

relative to completion of sewer extension to, . . . . . G. 237 1